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After the Public Turn Cover

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After the Public Turn

Composition, Counterpublics, and the Citizen Bricoleur

Frank Farmer

 In After the Public Turn, author Frank Farmer argues that counterpublics and the people who make counterpublics—“citizen bricoleurs”—deserve a more prominent role in our scholarship and in our classrooms. Encouraging students to understand and consider resistant or oppositional discourse is a viable route toward mature participation as citizens in a democracy. 


Farmer examines two very different kinds of publics, cultural and disciplinary, and discusses two counterpublics within those broad categories: zine discourses and certain academic discourses. By juxtaposing these two significantly different kinds of publics, Farmer suggests that each discursive world can be seen, in its own distinct way, as a counterpublic, an oppositional social formation that has a stake in widening or altering public life as we know it.

Drawing on major figures in rhetoric and cultural theory, Farmer builds his argument about composition teaching and its relation to the public sphere, leading to a more sophisticated understanding of public life and a deeper sense of what democratic citizenship means for our time.

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Afterschool

Images, Education and Research

Nancy Vansieleghem, Joris Vlieghe, Pieter Verstraete (eds)

Tangible tension of omnipresent images in education. The intricate relation between images and education is an old issue that can easily be dated back to the rise of Modernity. Ever since, it has been argued on the one hand that images might assist teachers in educating the new generation, but on the other might detract students’ attention by offering them mere entertainment instead of seriously pursuing essential subject material. Today, with the omnipresence of screens in our daily life, this tension has become all the more tangible. Some may even start to wonder whether education, traditionally conceived as schooling, is still achievable under these conditions. The title Afterschool refers to a film by Antonio Campos, which depicted these new conditions very accurately. In the same way the book articulates in an affirmative manner the role of education in an ‘Afterschool’ era, and also what images could signify in such an era, both for educators and educational researchers. All essays included in this book, in one way or another, respond to this process of digitization. At the same time, they present new and unexpected ways of making use of images in educational practice and research. Contributors Sönke Ahrens (independent researcher), Marc De Blieck (LUCA School of Arts, Ghent), Pieter-Jan Decoster (Ghent University), Florelle D’Hoest (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Jan Dietvorst (visual artist), Jan Masschelein (KU Leuven), Nancy Vansieleghem (LUCA School of Arts, Ghent), Maarten Vanvolsem (LUCA School of Arts, Brussels), Pieter Verstraete (KU Leuven), Roy Villevoye (visual artist) & Joris Vlieghe (Liverpool Hope University)

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Agents of Integration

Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act

Rebecca S. Nowacek

The question of how students transfer knowledge is an important one, as it addresses the larger issue of the educational experience. In Agents of Integration: Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act, Rebecca S. Nowacek explores, through a series of case studies, the issue of transfer by asking what in an educational setting engages students to become “agents of integration”— individuals actively working to perceive, as well as to convey effectively to others, the connections they make. 

While many studies of transfer are longitudinal, with data collected over several years, Nowacek’s is synchronous, a rich cross-section of the writing and classroom discussions produced by a team-taught learning community—three professors and eighteen students enrolled in a one-semester general education interdisciplinary humanities seminar that consisted of three linked courses in history, literature, and religious studies. With extensive field notes, carefully selected student and teacher self-reports in the form of interviews and focus groups, and thorough examinations of recorded classroom discussions, student papers with professor comments, and student notebooks, Nowacek presents a nuanced and engaging analysis that outlines how transfer is not simply a cognitive act but a rhetorical one that involves both seeing connections and presenting them to the instructors who are institutionally positioned to recognize and value them. 

Considering the challenges facing instructors teaching for transfer and the transfer of writing-related knowledge, Nowacek develops and outlines a new theoretical framework and methodological model of transfer and illustrates the practical implications through case studies and other classroom examples. She proposes transfer is best understood as an act of recontextualization, and she builds on this premise throughout the book by drawing from previous work in cognitive psychology, activity theory, and rhetorical genre theory, as well as her own analyses of student work. 

This focused examination complements existing longitudinal studies and will help readers better understand not only the opportunities and challenges confronting students as they work to become agents of integration but also the challenges facing instructors as they seek to support that student work.

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Aiding Students, Buying Students

Financial Aid in America

Rupert Wilkinson

From the first scholarship donated to Harvard in 1643 to today’s world of “enrollment management” and federal grants and loans, the author gives a lively social and economic history of the conflicting purposes of student aid and makes proposals for the future. His research for this book is based on archives and interviews at 131 public and private institutions across the United States. In the words of Joe Paul Case, Dean and Director of Financial Aid, Amherst College, “Wilkinson has mined the archives of dozens of institutions to create a mosaic that details the progress of student assistance from the 17th century to the present. He gives particular attention to the origins of need-based assistance, from the charitable benevolence of early colleges to the regulation-laden policies of the federal government. He gives due consideration to institutional motive—he challenges the egalitarian platitudes of affluent colleges and questions the countervailing market and economic forces that may imperil need-based aid at less competitive institutions. By drawing on scores of personal interviews and exchanges of correspondence with aid practitioners, Wilkinson fleshes out recent decades, helping the reader to understand new trends in the provision of aid.”

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Albert D. Kirwan

Frank F. Mathias

The name Albert Kirwan is inextricably bound with the University of Kentucky -- in sports, scholarship, and administration. His skills and interests were so many and varied that his accomplishments in one area could not long satisfy his restless nature; he captained and later coached the U.K. Wildcats, took degrees in law and history, wrote or edited six books, taught a full load of classes, became dean of students, graduate dean, and finally, was unanimously installed as seventh president of the University.

Under his guidance, the UK graduate program was improved and strengthened; he presented the University's case before the National Collegiate Athletic Association council concerning the 1948--49 basketball gambling scandals; he helped to see the University through its first tense period of integration; and he was able to handle student activism in the 1960s with both courage and understanding.

Beyond this, he was a gentle, devoted family man. His wife, Betty, his sons, and his sister have shared their memories of Albert Kirwan, providing much of the material included in the biographical section of this book; and Kirwan himself left a tape, "Some Memories of My Life," recorded in 1971, which Frank Mathias has blended with information culled from letters, files, and interviews.

During his lifetime, Albert Kirwan was often invited to speak before historical associations, at commencement exercises, athletic assemblies, on television, and on radio. Records of these speeches document his far-ranging thoughts on history, education, athletics, politics, the South, the Civil War, and civil rights, revealing him as a responsible and responsive liberal Kentucky gentleman. He was a man of many moods, and had a wry, tongue-in-cheek humor that enlivened his lectures and talks. The second section of the book is a selection of his speeches, letters, and excerpts from his articles and books, including a chapter from John ]. Crittenden: The Struggle for the Union, which won the Sydnor award. Reproduced here are Kirwan's analysis of the Kentucky court struggle of the 1820s and his statement before the Southeastern Conference on the penalty assessed against Kentucky's basketball team; and, here too are the more casual banquet speeches, the bantering affection of a warm, sensitive man among friends.

"Here is a man who has given his whole life to [the University of Kentucky]," Happy Chandler said of him, "... surely he must love it as perhaps no other person could."

All before Them Cover

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All before Them

Student Opportunities and Nationally Competitive Fellowships

Advisors face quite a challenge as they sort through the daunting and ever-changing world of nationally competitive undergraduate and graduate fellowships in order to assist talented students searching for funding for exceptional academic opportunities.

This collection of essays helps advisors by providing information about major changes in the fellowship and scholarship landscape. Included is guidance on the new Schwarzman scholarship for study in China, the recently added video interview for the Mitchell scholarship, and the new rules for the Rhodes personal statement (an advisor’s take). Additionally, seasoned advisors share practical advice, ranging from workshops that engage students and faculty to helpful technological tools to personal statements and office assessments. Keeping the focus on the scholar in the scholarship process is a central theme. All before Them is an important addition to any faculty mentor’s or scholarship advisor’s toolkit.

All In Cover

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All In

Expanding Access through Nationally Competitive Awards

Suzanne McCray

All In helps readers navigate the ultra-competitive world of national and international scholarships. It combines the perspectives of scholarship foundation leaders, who have an insider’s view of the selection process, and experienced advisors, who provide guidance on how to assist students effectively as they approach applications and interviews. The collection also emphasizes the importance of engaging a diverse group of students, institutions, and programs in the process as well as expanding the educational experience for students as they apply. Several of the essays in the book grew out of the 2011 National Association of Fellowships Advisors conference entitled “Broadening Opportunities, Encouraging Diversity.”

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All the King's Women

Mimi Chan

This book is a work of historical fiction and gives an insider view of life within that household.

Alone in the Mainstream Cover

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Alone in the Mainstream

A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School

Gina A. Oliva

Alpha Phi Alpha Cover

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Alpha Phi Alpha

A Legacy of Greatness, The Demands of Transcendence

edited by Gregory S. Parks and Stefan M. Bradley

On December 4, 1906, on Cornell University’s campus, seven black men founded one of the greatest and most enduring organizations in American history. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. has brought together and shaped such esteemed men as Martin Luther King Jr., Cornel West, Thurgood Marshall, Wes Moore, W. E. B. DuBois, Roland Martin, and Paul Robeson. “Born in the shadow of slavery and on the lap of disenfranchisement,” Alpha Phi Alpha—like other black Greek-letter organizations—was founded to instill a spirit of high academic achievement and intellectualism, foster meaningful and lifelong ties, and racially uplift those brothers who would be initiated into its ranks. In Alpha Phi Alpha, Gregory S. Parks, Stefan M. Bradley, and other contributing authors analyze the fraternity and its members’ fidelity to the founding precepts set forth in 1906. They discuss the identity established by the fraternity at its inception, the challenges of protecting the image and brand, and how the organization can identify and train future Alpha men to uphold the standards of an outstanding African American fraternity. Drawing on organizational identity theory and a diverse array of methodologies, the authors raise and answer questions that are relevant not only to Alpha Phi Alpha but to all black Greek-letter organizations.

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