Browse Results For:

Education

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT next

Results 31-40 of 1872

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Adult Abilities

A Study of University Extension Students

Herbert Sorenson

Adult Abilities: A Study of University Extension Students was first published in 1950. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.Adults learn much better than is commonly believed; this is the conclusion reached by Dr. Herbert Sorenson in a nation-wide study of many thousands of adult students in university extension classes. Dr. Sorenson conducted a personal investigation in the state universities of Virginia, California, Kentucky, Colorado, Utah, Indiana, and Minnesota, as well as numerous other schools throughout the country that offer courses for adults. His findings, incorporated in this volume, contribute a substantial body of new data on a subject about which too little has been known heretofore.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Adult Literacy and American Identity

The Moonlight Schools and Americanization Programs

Samantha NeCamp

The release of U.S. census data in 1910 sparked rhetoric declaring the nation had a literacy crisis and proclaiming illiterate citizens a threat to democratic life. While newspaper editors, industrialists, and officials in the federal government frequently placed the blame on newly arrived immigrants, a smaller but no less vocal group of rural educators and clubwomen highlighted the significant number of native-born illiterate adults in the Appalachian region. Author Samantha NeCamp looks at the educational response to these two distinct literacy narratives—the founding of the Moonlight Schools in eastern Kentucky, focused on native-born nonliterate adults, and the establishment of the Americanization movement, dedicated to the education of recent immigrants.

Drawing on personal correspondence, conference proceedings, textbooks, and speeches, NeCamp demonstrates how the Moonlight Schools and the Americanization movement competed for public attention, the interest of educators, and private and governmental funding, fueling a vibrant public debate about the definition of literacy. The very different pedagogical practices of the two movements—and how these practices were represented to the public—helped shape literacy education in the United States. Reading the Moonlight Schools and the Americanization movement in relation to one another, Adult Literacy and American Identity expands the history and theory of literacy and literacy education in the United States. This book will be of interest to scholars in literacy, Appalachian studies, and rhetoric and composition.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Advances in Research Using the C-SPAN Archives

by Robert X. Browning

This book is a guide to the latest research using the C-SPAN Archives. In this book, nine authors present original work using the video archives to study presidential debates, public opinion and Congress, analysis of the Violence Against Women Act and the Great Lakes freshwater legislation, as well as President Clinton’s grand jury testimony. The C-SPAN Archives contain over 220,000 hours of first run digital video of the nation’s public affairs record. These and other essays serve as guides for scholars who want to explore the research potential of this robust public policy and communications resource.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Advances in Teaching Sign Language Interpreters

Cynthia B. Roy, Editor

Analyzing Syntax and Semantics features the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) approach. This method uses student performance objectives, practice, feedback, individualization of pace, and repeatable testing as instructional strategies.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Advancing Democracy

African Americans and the Struggle for Access and Equity in Higher Education in Texas

Amilcar Shabazz

As we approach the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education (1954), it is important to consider the historical struggles that led to this groundbreaking decision. Four years earlier in Texas, the Sweatt v. Painter decision allowed blacks access to the University of Texas's law school for the first time. Amilcar Shabazz shows that the development of black higher education in Texas--which has historically had one of the largest state college and university systems in the South--played a pivotal role in the challenge to Jim Crow education.

Shabazz begins with the creation of the Texas University Movement in the 1880s to lobby for equal access to the full range of graduate and professional education through a first-class university for African Americans. He traces the philosophical, legal, and grassroots components of the later campaign to open all Texas colleges and universities to black students, showing the complex range of strategies and the diversity of ideology and methodology on the part of black activists and intellectuals working to promote educational equality. Shabazz credits the efforts of blacks who fought for change by demanding better resources for segregated black colleges in the years before Brown, showing how crucial groundwork for nationwide desegregation was laid in the state of Texas.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

An Adventure in Education

The College of Wooster from Howard Lowry to the Twenty-First Century

The College of Wooster was a proud but modest college for much of its life, exemplified by the titles of the first two volumes of its history, Wooster of the Middle West. In 1944, a Wooster alumnus named Howard Lowry became president and created the Independent Study (I.S.) program, distinguishing Wooster from other quality liberal arts colleges nationwide. I.S. was and is much more than a capstone research project for seniors; the heavy responsibility of mentoring undergraduate research was offset for faculty by university level research leave, guaranteeing Wooster a faculty of true teacher­scholars.

This third volume of Wooster’s history begins with Lowry’s arrival during World War II, when Navy V­5 cadets were almost the only males on campus. At war’s end, a cadre of veterans taking advantage of the GI Bill arrived, young men tougher and worldlier than Wooster’s traditional students, and the demographics changed. Typical for universities at the time, Wooster students followed the rules in the moderate ’50s, before the ’60s unsettled this and many other campuses. Dramatic blows struck in 1967, when the elegant 66­year­old bachelor president suffered a fatal heart attack in the San Francisco apartment of his 27­year­old woman friend, leaving a college shocked both by his death and by financial strains that few knew about until then.

Wooster’s next decade was rocky and cautiously traversed. One antidote for the financial crisis was expansion of the student body, which grew revenue but lowered academic standards and frustrated an overworked faculty. In 1977, Henry Copeland, a 41­year­old historian, was the surprising choice for president, and his term marked a double triumph: restoring the College’s academic integrity and raising endowment from $15 million to more than $150 million in little more than a decade. Roads to success are rarely smooth—a failed presidential search following Copeland’s retirement embarrassed the College—but the Wooster family proved too solid and too dedicated to stumble for long.

As An Adventure in Education brings Wooster into the twenty­first century, it finds a picture­book campus with extraordinary new facilities, national recognition for both I.S. and the quality of its teaching, a student body diverse in terms domestic and international, and a striking confidence and ambition that might have surprised even Howard Lowry. How the college got from there to here is a tale instructive for anyone concerned with American higher education.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

The Adventurous Traveler's Guide to Health

Christopher Allen Sanford, M.D.

The Adventurous Traveler's Guide to Health is just what every traveler needs: a straight-forward look at what you can do to stay healthy during your travels, from start to finish. Whether headed to the urban centers of Africa or the jungles of southeast Asia, there are precautions to be taken even before setting foot on a plane, as well as important things to remember once your travels are over.

Chris Sanford aids travelers in first finding a travel health specialist and then knowing exactly which questions to ask. The Adventurous Traveler's Guide to Health will also serve as a take-along guide to help deal with illnesses or symptoms that may arise while you're on the road and as a post-trip reference for any delayed symptoms.

Aside from infectious diseases, Sanford also looks at the more common and overlooked problems travelers are likely to encounter, such as health risks in cities (pollution and motor vehicle accidents, for example), traveling if chronically ill or immuno-compromised, and high-altitude sickness. Each of the book's chapters includes a question-and-answer section based on real questions that Dr. Sanford's patients have asked him.

General travelers, including students going abroad to study or backpack through the developing world and travelers who want to get off the beaten path as well as explore the cities of the world, will find this an invaluable resource.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Affirmative Action and the University

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Higher Education Employment

Kul B. Rai

Affirmative Action and the University is the only full-length study to examine the impact of affirmative action on all higher education hiring practices. Drawing on data provided by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, the authors summarize, track, and evaluate changes in the gender and ethnic makeup of academic and nonacademic employees at private and public colleges and universities from the late 1970s through the mid-1990s. Separate chapters assess changes in employment opportunities for white women, blacks, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans.

The authors look at the extent to which a two-tier employment system exists. In such a system minorities and women are more likely to make their greatest gains in non-elite positions rather than in faculty and administrative positions. The authors also examine differences in hiring practices between public and private colleges and universities.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Affirmative Action in Medicine

Improving Health Care for Everyone

James L. Curtis, M.D.

Affirmative action programs have significantly changed American medicine for the better, not only in medical school admissions and access to postgraduate training but also in bringing a higher quality of health care to all people. James L. Curtis approaches this important transition from historical, statistical, and personal perspectives. He tells how over the course of his medical education and career as a psychiatrist and professor--often as the first or only African American in his cohort--the status of minorities in the medical professions grew from a tiny percentage to a far more equitable representation of the American population. Advancing arguments from his earlier book, Blacks, Medical Schools, and Society, Curtis evaluates the outcomes of affirmative action efforts over the past thirty years. He describes formidable barriers to minority access to medical-education opportunities and the resulting problems faced by minority patients in receiving medical treatment. His progress report includes a review of two thousand minority students admitted to U.S. medical schools in 1969, following them through graduation and their careers, comparing them with the careers of two thousand of their nonminority peers. These samples provide an important look at medical schools that, while heralding dramatic progress in physician education and training opportunity, indicates much room for further improvement. A basic hurdle continues to face African Americans and other minorities who are still confined to segregated neighborhoods and inferior school systems that stifle full scholastic development. Curtis urges us as a nation to develop all our human resources through an expansion of affirmative action programs, thus improving health care for everyone. James L. Curtis is Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT next

Results 31-40 of 1872

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (1842)
  • (30)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access