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Education > Teaching Methods

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Interrogating Privilege Cover

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Interrogating Privilege

Reflections of a Second Language Educator

Stephanie Vandrick

Interrogating Privilege is a welcome combination of personal essays and academic research, blending theory, analysis, and narrative to explore the function and consequences of privilege in second language education. While teachers’ focus on the learning process and class goals are quite important, there is not enough attention paid to the types of privilege—or lack thereof—that individuals bring to the classroom. Through chapters that can either stand alone or be read together, with topics such as gender, age, and colonialism (the author is the daughter of missionary parents) in second language teaching, this book seeks to address the experiences of teachers, scholars, and students as “whole persons” and to observe the workings of identity and privilege in the educational setting.

Into the Classroom Cover

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Into the Classroom

A Practical Guide for Starting Student Teaching

Rosalyn McKeown

Student teaching can be an endeavor fraught with anxiety. Those entering the classroom for the first time face the daunting challenge of translating coursework on the theory of teaching into real-world experience. Common questions for anxious student teachers include: Will I be a good teacher? Will I ever get control of my classroom? How can I do all of this grading and plan for next week at the same time? This helpful guide by teacher educator Rosalyn McKeown offers practical suggestions for student teachers, interns, and teacher candidates just starting out in a secondary school classroom. This easy-to-read text enables new educators to rapidly advance their teaching skills early in their pre-service experiences. After exploring the pitfalls of inexperience and providing helpful guidance on maintaining order in the classroom, McKeown focuses on teaching skills. She advises readers on writing objectives and lesson plans, creating interesting ways to start and end class, introducing variety into the classroom, lecturing, asking meaningful questions, and using visual aids. Among the other topics discussed are setting up a classroom, recognizing differences in learning styles, and developing an individual teaching style. Sidebars scattered throughout the text offer useful advice on everything from how to deal with stage fright and distracting noises from outside, to planning for block scheduling and avoiding the attributes of a boring teacher. With McKeown’s own list of expectations for her classes, templates for hall passes and lesson plans, and scores of tips garnered from years of experience, Into the Classroom provides information a first-time teacher needs to enter the secondary classroom with confidence.

Is William Martinez Not Our Brother? Cover

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Is William Martinez Not Our Brother?

Twenty Years of the Prison Creative Arts Project

Buzz Alexander

Prisons are an invisible, but dominant, part of American society: the United States incarcerates more people than any other nation in the world, with 25 percent of the world's prisoners currently held within its borders. In Michigan, the number of prisoners rose from 3,000 in 1970 to more than 50,000 by 2008, a shift that Buzz Alexander witnessed firsthand when he came to teach at the University of Michigan. Is William Martinez Not Our Brother? describes the University of Michigan's Prison Creative Arts Project (PCAP), a pioneering program founded in 1990 that works with incarcerated youth and adults in Michigan juvenile facilities and prisons. Alexander recounts the genesis and evolution of this radically pragmatic and original system that begins with university courses for credit, then offers students a university-based nonprofit organization through which they may continue and deepen their practice, and finally gives them a national network as well as connections with the national movement resisting mass incarceration in this country, and with social careers in general. By giving incarcerated individuals an opportunity to participate in the arts, PCAP enables them to withstand and often overcome the conditions and culture of prison, the policies of an incarcerating state, and the consequences of mass incarceration. The book is also a deeply personal account of Alexander's long commitment to confronting the continually rising numbers of prisoners in America, his dedication as an educator, and his attempts to provide a way to reach out on a practical and emotional level to inmates. The model he describes applies to both public scholarship and everyday politics and will inspire readers in all fields. Buzz Alexander is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of English Language and Literature, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, at the University of Michigan and was Carnegie National Professor of the Year in 2005.

Journal Writing in Second Language Education Cover

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Journal Writing in Second Language Education

Christine Pearson Casanave

Journal writing is not new--journals have been around for centuries. More recently, journals have been viewed as a means of scaffolding reflective teaching and encouraging reflectivity in research processes. As a result, some educators may ask, “What more do we need to know?” Those likely to raise this question are probably not thinking of the explosive growth of reflective writing enabled by social networking on the Web, the blogs and other interactive e-vehicles for reflection on experiences in our literate, “real,” and virtual lives This revisiting of journal writing from a 21st century perspective, informed by relevant earlier literature, is what Christine Pearson Casanave guides readers through in this first book-length treatment of the use of journal writing in the contexts of language learning, pre and in-service teaching, and research. Casanave has put together existing ideas that haven't been put together before and has done it not as an edited collection, but as a single-authored book. She has done it in a way that will be especially accessible to teachers in language teacher education programs and to practicing teachers and researchers of writing in both second and foreign language settings, and in a way that will inspire all of us to think about, not just do, journal writing. Those who have never attempted to use journals in their classes and own lives, as well as others who have used it with mixed results, will probably be tempted to try it in at least some of the venues Casanave provides guidance for. Those already committed to journal writing will very likely find in this book new reasons for expanding and enhancing their use of journals.

Keywords in Creative Writing Cover

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Keywords in Creative Writing

Wendy Bishop and David Starkey

Wendy Bishop and David Starkey have created a remarkable resource volume for creative writing students and other writers just getting started. In two- to ten-page discussions, these authors introduce forty-one central concepts in the fields of creative writing and writing instruction, with discussions that are accessible yet grounded in scholarship and years of experience.

Keywords in Creative Writing provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to the field of creative writing through its landmark terms, exploring concerns as abstract as postmodernism and identity politics alongside very practical interests of beginning writers, like contests, agents, and royalties. This approach makes the book ideal for the college classroom as well as the writer’s bookshelf, and unique in the field, combining the pragmatic accessibility of popular writer’s handbooks, with a wider, more scholarly vision of theory and research.

Learning and Teaching in the Chinese Classroom Cover

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Learning and Teaching in the Chinese Classroom

Responding to Individual Needs

Shane N. Phillipson, Bick-har Lam

A major concern of all education authorities around the world is the challenge that schools face in catering for learner diversity. That this concern is shared by authorities in East Asia, including the Education Bureau (EDB) of Hong Kong, is surprising given the high academic achievement of students from this part of the world. This book helps to meet this challenge for teachers in East Asia by focusing on specific research that helps explain the basis for diversity in the Chinese learner. Although there are many textbooks that cover the basic principles of educational psychology, few do not focus on the Chinese learner. This book makes the link between the broad field of educational psychology and how these theories contribute to our understanding of the Chinese learner. This book is unique in that it draws on recent research to illustrate the application of these theories, thereby helping teachers and students in teacher education progammes understand the variability in student achievement. Our book is based on the idea that the Chinese context is in many ways different to other cultural contexts, and that teachers can make a difference to the outcomes of student learning. We also draw on our many years of experience in educating future teachers where our students want us to focus on the Chinese classroom. Our student-teachers also want to be educated by professors who are themselves researchers. In drawing on research about the Chinese learner we also bring to our student-teachers the richness and value of educational research. We also encourage our student-teachers to think of themselves as “professional researchers” in terms of developing an understanding of the research literature and in finding solutions to their classroom problems.

Les Littératies Cover

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Les Littératies

Perspectives linguistique, familiale et culturelle

Sous la direction de Anne-Marie Dionne et Marie Josée Berger

Signées par des spécialistes provenant de différentes provinces canadiennes, les huit études réunies dans ce volume nous font découvrir que l'acquisition de la littératie est influencée tant par le développement linguistique que l'environnement familial ou la société dans laquelle l'enfant évolue. La littératie -- néologisme qui s'intègre graduellement dans le langage de l'éducation -- vise à rendre compte du caractère englobant de la langue et de la culture. En effet, la littératie dépasse le simple fait de savoir lire et écrire et renvoie aux capacités de l'individu à maîtriser l'écrit pour penser, communiquer, acquérir des connaissances, résoudre des problèmes, réfléchir sur son existence, partager sa culture et se divertir. L'individu lettré ne peut donc se définir sans l'écrit qui est un atout indispensable pour lire, se lire et lire le monde qui nous entoure. Chaque étude contribue de façon originale à faire comprendre les enjeux essentiels qui influencent la littératie.

Let’s Read Cover

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Let’s Read

A Linguistic Approach

By Cynthia A. Barnhart and Robert K. Barnhart Based on the original work of Leonard Bloomfield and Clarence L. Barnhart

A classic reading-instruction text, updated to be more contemporary and teacher- and user-friendly.

Lire le monde Cover

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Lire le monde

Les littératies multiples et l'éducation dans les communautés francophones

Diana Masny

Le mot littératie désigne l'ensemble des connaissances nécessaires à la lecture et à l'écriture. Nouveau en éducation, le concept des littératies multiples reflète notre ère de la mondialisation, où lire et écrire ne sont plus confinés à l'imprimé. Il s'agit de parler, de lire, d'écrire et de valoriser les réalités de la vie dans la multiplicité et la complexité, c'est-à-dire lire, se lire et lire le monde tout en tenant compte du visuel, de l'oral, de l'écrit, du tactile et de l'hypermédiatique. Ce recueil remet en question la culture de l'écrit et aborde les diverses dimensions des littératies multiples par rapport aux mathématiques, à la musique, aux sciences et à la santé, et ce, pour les enfants, les adolescents et les adultes en milieu minoritaire. Il s'adresse aux chercheurs, aux praticiens, aux intervenants et aux organismes gouvernementaux et communautaires qui doivent comprendre comment les minorités linguistiques lisent au 21e siècle.

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Listening Myths

Applying Second Language Research to Classroom Teaching

Steven Brown

This volume was conceived as a "best practices" resource for teachers of ESL listening courses in the way that Vocabulary Myths by Keith S. Folse (and Writing Myths by Joy Reid) is one for reading and vocabulary teachers. It was written to help ensure that teachers of listening are not perpetuating the myths of teaching listening. Both the research and pedagogy in this book are based on the newest research in the field of second language acquisition. Steven Brown is the author of the Active Listening textbook series and is a teacher trainer. The myths debunked in this book are: § Listening is the same as reading. § Listening is passive. § Listening equals comprehension. § Because L1 language ability is effortlessly acquired, L2 listening ability is too. § Listening means listening to conversations. § Listening is an individual, inside-the-head process. § Students should only listen to authentic materials. § Listening can’t be taught

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