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Dirty Words

The Rhetoric of Public Sex Education, 1870-1924

Robin E. Jensen

Dirty Words: The Rhetoric of Public Sex Education, 1870-1924, details the approaches and outcomes of sex-education initiatives in the Progressive Era. In analyzing the rhetorical strategies of sex-education advocates, Robin E. Jensen engages with rich sources such as lectures, books, movies, and posters that were often shaped by female health advocates and instructors. Her narrative demonstrates how women were both leaders and innovators in early U.S. sex-education movements, striving to provide education to underserved populations of women, minorities, and the working class. Investigating the communicative and rhetorical practices surrounding the emergence of public sex education in the United States, Jensen shows how women in particular struggled for a platform to create and circulate arguments concerning this controversial issue.

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Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat

The Origins of School Lunch in the United States

A. R. Ruis

In Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat, historian A. R. Ruis explores the origins of American school meal initiatives to explain why it was (and, to some extent, has continued to be) so difficult to establish meal programs that satisfy the often competing interests of children, parents, schools, health authorities, politicians, and the food industry. Through careful studies of several key contexts and detailed analysis of the policies and politics that governed the creation of school meal programs, Ruis demonstrates how the early history of school meal program development helps us understand contemporary debates over changes to school lunch policies.  
 

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Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World

The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Marcelo Suarez-Orozco, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj, 0

“When I visited the Long Island Ross School I was struck by the way Courtney Ross and her team successfully brought together the elements of an effective school: reflective teachers, innovative curriculum, and student-centered instruction. It is no wonder that the school has been a magnet for some of the most influential education thinkers of our time. In Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World, Suarez-Orozco and Sattin-Bajaj have created a multi-faceted meditation on the ever-evolving Ross model of education, with relevant lessons for educators everywhere.”

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Education and Democracy

The Meaning of Alexander Meiklejohn, 1872–1964

Adam R. Nelson

"Intellectual biography at its best. Nelson has presented us with the whole Meiklejohn, warts and all." —E. David Cronon, coauthor of The University of Wisconsin: A History -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This is the definitive biography of Alexander Meiklejohn, one of the most important and controversial educators and civil libertarians of the twentieth century. A charismatic teacher and philosopher with extrordinarily high expectations for democratic self-government in the United States, Meiklejohn was both beloved and reviled during his long life. Brilliant and dedicated, he could also be stubborn and arrogant, and his passion for his own ideals led to frequent clashes with prominent and powerful critics. The son of reform-minded, working-class immigrants from Scotland, Meiklejohn rejected the spiritually agnostic and politically instrumentalist philosophies of his Progressive-Era contemporaries, many of whom, he argued, simply took democracy for granted. As dean of Brown University at the outset of the twentieth century, he lamented the disintegration of the old classical curriculum and questioned the rising influence of amoral science in modern higher education. He served as president of Amherst College during the culturally turbulent years of World War I, a director of the famous Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin during the late 1920s and early 1930s, and as a delegate to UNESCO after World War II. An outspoken defender of the First Amendment during the McCarthy era, he was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. "Alexander Meiklejohn was a self-proclaimed idealist living in an increasingly pragmatic age, and his central question remains essential today: How can education teach citizens to be free?" "A splendid piece of work. It is a fascinating character study of an extraordinary figure in American intellectual and educational history. Nelson presents a very balanced portrait of the man, his strengths and weaknesses."—Charles W. Anderson, author of Prescribing the Life of the Mind Adam R. Nelson is assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University. Previously a lecturer on history and literature at Harvard University, he is currently working on a history of internationalism in American higher education.

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Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America

Adam R. Nelson

Vividly revealing the multiple layers on which print has been produced, consumed, regulated, and contested for the purpose of education since the mid-nineteenth century, the historical case studies in Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America deploy a view of education that extends far beyond the confines of traditional classrooms. The nine essays examine “how print educates” in settings as diverse as depression-era work camps, religious training, and broadcast television—all the while revealing the enduring tensions that exist among the controlling interests of print producers and consumers. This volume exposes what counts as education in American society and the many contexts in which education and print intersect.
    Offering perspectives from print culture history, library and information studies, literary studies, labor history, gender history, the history of race and ethnicity, the history of science and technology, religious studies, and the history of childhood and adolescence, Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America pioneers an investigation into the intersection of education and print culture.

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Education and the Labour Movement 1870-1920

Brian Simon

The second volume of Brian Simon’s series Studies in the History of Education traces developments from the securing of universal education with the Education Act of 1870 to the conclusion of the First World War. These educational developments were marked by the increasing role played by organised labour in pressing for the reform of the system of universal education – opposing class privilege and prejudice and urging equal opportunities for all. With the formation of the public schools and then with the defeat of the school boards which were trying to improve the opportunities for working-class children, a divided system of education became well-established, in which the few were trained for university entrance and then for the top jobs while the mass were denied anything but an ‘elementary’ education. While Labour Party opposition to this division was largely unsuccessful many vital concessions were won in these years including the abolition of school fees and the provision of school meals. The book also explores the effects of imperialist expansion on educational ideas and also examines the developments in adult education.

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Education and the Social Order

1940-1990

Brian Simon

Education and the Social Order examines the changes and developments in the British education system from the Second World War to the eve of the millennium.Education has always been a battlefield and never more so than in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Simon argues that educational policy usually reflects the outcome of a struggle between progressives who see reform as a first step towards social change, and conservatives who prefer a stratified system which reflects existing social divisions. Beginning with the 1944 Education Act, the book documents the changes that took place as the result of these battles: it begins with the 1944 Education Act and the massive extension of educational opportunity that took place in the postwar period; it then deals with the subsequent prolonged debates about comprehensive education, and other measures of liberalisation during the 1960s and 1970s; and it ends with the years of Conservative government, the 1980s and 1990s, when systematic attempts were made to reverse the advances that had been made during the earlier period.

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Education beyond the Mesas

Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Education beyond the Mesas is the fascinating story of how generations of Hopi schoolchildren from northeastern Arizona “turned the power” by using compulsory federal education to affirm their way of life and better their community. Sherman Institute in Riverside, California, one of the largest off-reservation boarding schools in the United States, followed other federally funded boarding schools of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in promoting the assimilation of indigenous people into mainstream America. Many Hopi schoolchildren, deeply conversant in Hopi values and traditional education before being sent to Sherman Institute, resisted this program of acculturation. Immersed in learning about another world, generations of Hopi children drew on their culture to skillfully navigate a system designed to change them irrevocably. In fact, not only did the Hopi children strengthen their commitment to their families and communities while away in the “land of oranges,” they used their new skills, fluency in English, and knowledge of politics and economics to help their people when they eventually returned home. Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert draws on interviews, archival records, and his own experiences growing up in the Hopi community to offer a powerful account of a quiet, enduring triumph.

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Education Reform in Florida

Diversity and Equity in Public Policy

In Education Reform in Florida, sociologists and historians evaluate Governor Jeb Bush’s nation-leading school reform policies since 1999. They examine the startlingly broad range of education policy changes enacted in Florida during Bush’s first term, including moves toward privatization with a voucher system, more government control of public education institutions with centralized accountability mechanisms, and a “superboard” for all public education. The contributors arrive at a mixed conclusion regarding Bush’s first-term education policies: while he deserves credit for holding students to higher standards, his policies have, unfortunately, pushed for equality in a very narrow way. The contributors remain skeptical about seeing significant and sweeping improvement in how well Florida schools work for all students.

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An Educational Pilgrimage to the United States. Un pèlerinage psycho-pédagogique aux États-Unis.

Travel Diary of Raymond Buyse, 1922. Carnet de voyage de Raymond Buyse, 1922.

Marc Depaepe ; Lieven D'hulst

In 1922, a young Belgian ‘pedologist' named Raymond Buyse accompanied the famous Dr. Ovide Decroly on a study tour of the United States of America. They met with well-known American professors to learn more about the ‘scientific' study of the child and especially about applied American psychology. Buyse noted his impressions of the trip in a diary. These are scribbles, sometimes difficult to decipher, written on loose sheets, held together by a ring binder. They reflect the culture shock experienced by Buyse in confronting this dazzling nation. The young scholar writes in a lively style and with humour about his meetings with the ‘great' psychologists and educationalists of that time, visualizing his impressions of the land and the people with little drawings in the text. Here the record of this fascinating scholarly and cultural encounter is published for the first time, both in the original French with an English translation. In their exhaustive introduction Marc Depaepe and Lieven D'hulst explain the historical context of this both personal and intellectual journey to the present-day reader.

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