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Education > History of Education

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Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World Cover

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Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World

The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Marcelo Suarez-Orozco, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj, 0

“When I visited the Long Island Ross School I was struck by the way Courtney Ross and her team successfully brought together the elements of an effective school: reflective teachers, innovative curriculum, and student-centered instruction. It is no wonder that the school has been a magnet for some of the most influential education thinkers of our time. In Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World, Suarez-Orozco and Sattin-Bajaj have created a multi-faceted meditation on the ever-evolving Ross model of education, with relevant lessons for educators everywhere.”

Education and Democracy Cover

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Education and Democracy

The Meaning of Alexander Meiklejohn, 1872–1964

Adam R. Nelson

"Intellectual biography at its best. Nelson has presented us with the whole Meiklejohn, warts and all." —E. David Cronon, coauthor of The University of Wisconsin: A History -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This is the definitive biography of Alexander Meiklejohn, one of the most important and controversial educators and civil libertarians of the twentieth century. A charismatic teacher and philosopher with extrordinarily high expectations for democratic self-government in the United States, Meiklejohn was both beloved and reviled during his long life. Brilliant and dedicated, he could also be stubborn and arrogant, and his passion for his own ideals led to frequent clashes with prominent and powerful critics. The son of reform-minded, working-class immigrants from Scotland, Meiklejohn rejected the spiritually agnostic and politically instrumentalist philosophies of his Progressive-Era contemporaries, many of whom, he argued, simply took democracy for granted. As dean of Brown University at the outset of the twentieth century, he lamented the disintegration of the old classical curriculum and questioned the rising influence of amoral science in modern higher education. He served as president of Amherst College during the culturally turbulent years of World War I, a director of the famous Experimental College at the University of Wisconsin during the late 1920s and early 1930s, and as a delegate to UNESCO after World War II. An outspoken defender of the First Amendment during the McCarthy era, he was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. "Alexander Meiklejohn was a self-proclaimed idealist living in an increasingly pragmatic age, and his central question remains essential today: How can education teach citizens to be free?" "A splendid piece of work. It is a fascinating character study of an extraordinary figure in American intellectual and educational history. Nelson presents a very balanced portrait of the man, his strengths and weaknesses."—Charles W. Anderson, author of Prescribing the Life of the Mind Adam R. Nelson is assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University. Previously a lecturer on history and literature at Harvard University, he is currently working on a history of internationalism in American higher education.

Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America Cover

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Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America

Adam R. Nelson

Vividly revealing the multiple layers on which print has been produced, consumed, regulated, and contested for the purpose of education since the mid-nineteenth century, the historical case studies in Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America deploy a view of education that extends far beyond the confines of traditional classrooms. The nine essays examine “how print educates” in settings as diverse as depression-era work camps, religious training, and broadcast television—all the while revealing the enduring tensions that exist among the controlling interests of print producers and consumers. This volume exposes what counts as education in American society and the many contexts in which education and print intersect.
    Offering perspectives from print culture history, library and information studies, literary studies, labor history, gender history, the history of race and ethnicity, the history of science and technology, religious studies, and the history of childhood and adolescence, Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America pioneers an investigation into the intersection of education and print culture.

Education beyond the Mesas Cover

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Education beyond the Mesas

Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Education beyond the Mesas is the fascinating story of how generations of Hopi schoolchildren from northeastern Arizona “turned the power” by using compulsory federal education to affirm their way of life and better their community. Sherman Institute in Riverside, California, one of the largest off-reservation boarding schools in the United States, followed other federally funded boarding schools of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in promoting the assimilation of indigenous people into mainstream America. Many Hopi schoolchildren, deeply conversant in Hopi values and traditional education before being sent to Sherman Institute, resisted this program of acculturation. Immersed in learning about another world, generations of Hopi children drew on their culture to skillfully navigate a system designed to change them irrevocably. In fact, not only did the Hopi children strengthen their commitment to their families and communities while away in the “land of oranges,” they used their new skills, fluency in English, and knowledge of politics and economics to help their people when they eventually returned home. Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert draws on interviews, archival records, and his own experiences growing up in the Hopi community to offer a powerful account of a quiet, enduring triumph.

Education Reform in Florida Cover

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Education Reform in Florida

Diversity and Equity in Public Policy

In Education Reform in Florida, sociologists and historians evaluate Governor Jeb Bush’s nation-leading school reform policies since 1999. They examine the startlingly broad range of education policy changes enacted in Florida during Bush’s first term, including moves toward privatization with a voucher system, more government control of public education institutions with centralized accountability mechanisms, and a “superboard” for all public education. The contributors arrive at a mixed conclusion regarding Bush’s first-term education policies: while he deserves credit for holding students to higher standards, his policies have, unfortunately, pushed for equality in a very narrow way. The contributors remain skeptical about seeing significant and sweeping improvement in how well Florida schools work for all students.

The Enlightenment in Practice Cover

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The Enlightenment in Practice

Academic Prize Contests and Intellectual Culture in France, 1670–1794

by Jeremy L. Caradonna

Public academic prize contests-the concours académique-played a significant role in the intellectual life of Enlightenment France, with aspirants formulating positions on such matters as slavery, poverty, the education of women, tax reform, and urban renewal and submitting the resulting essays for scrutiny by panels of judges. In The Enlightenment in Practice, Jeremy L. Caradonna draws on archives both in Paris and the provinces to show that thousands of individuals-ranging from elite men and women of letters artisans, and peasants-participated in these intellectual competitions, a far broader range of people than has been previously assumed.

Caradonna contends that the Enlightenment in France can no longer be seen as a cultural movement restricted to a small coterie of philosophers or a limited number of printed texts. Moreover, Caradonna demonstrates that the French monarchy took academic competitions quite seriously, sponsoring numerous contests on such practical matters as deforestation, the quality of drinking water, and the nighttime illumination of cities. In some cases, the contests served as an early mechanism for technology transfer: the state used submissions to identify technical experts to whom it could turn for advice. Finally, the author shows how this unique intellectual exercise declined during the upheavals of the French Revolution, when voicing moderate public criticism became a rather dangerous act.

Entomology at the Land Grant University Cover

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Entomology at the Land Grant University

Perspectives from the Texas A&M University Department Centenary

Edited by Kevin M. Heinz, Raymond E. Frisbie and Carlos E. Bográn

Insects affect the health and well-being of humans every day, everywhere, so the entomology departments that study them make a crucial contribution to many aspects of life. Indeed, agricultural success in the United States and other countries depends upon the work of entomology departments within the land grant system at universities across the nation. Entomology at the Land Grant University is a thorough look at how entomology departments have adapted to shifting demographics, changes in land use patterns, environmental issues, and advances in the life sciences. It also highlights the leadership of entomologists in their multifaceted roles as researchers, teachers, and consultants. With world-renowned contributors from both academia and industry, this volume is the culmination of a series of mini-symposia celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Department of Entomology at Texas A&M University. The centenary was a time to reflect on past accomplishments and to plan for future challenges, spotlighting the academic, scientific, economic, and social importance of entomology. The result is a broad-brushed picture of a discipline that at its best represents the highest virtues of fundamental and applied science, with topics such as: - fulfilling the land grant university mission - roles of entomology departments - the function of the extension service - the global reach of entomological research - civic education in insect management - genetic engineering - future innovations in pest management and insecticide design Not just for entomologists, this insightful look into the workings of a university department within the context of a rapidly changing scientific, social, and economic climate will appeal to anyone associated with a land grant university, extension or regulatory agency, or related industry.

The Era of Education Cover

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The Era of Education

The Presidents and the Schools, 1965-2001

Lawrence J. McAndrews

This study of educational policy from Lyndon Johnson through Bill Clinton focuses on three specific issues--public school aid, non-public (especially Catholic) school aid, and school desegregation--that speak to the proper role of the federal government in education as well as to how education issues embody larger questions of opportunity, exclusion, and equality in American society. Lawrence J. McAndrews traces the evolution of policy as each president developed (or avoided developing) a stance toward these issues and discusses the repercussions and implications of policy decisions for the educational community over nearly four decades.

The Evolution of College English  Cover

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The Evolution of College English

Literacy Studies from the Puritans to the Postmoderns

Thomas P. Miller

In The Evolution of College English, Thomas P. Miller defines college English studies as literacy studies and presents a history of how it has evolved in tandem with broader developments. He maps out “four corners” of English departments: literature, language studies, teacher education, and writing studies. Miller identifies their development with changes in the technologies and economies of literacy that have redefined what students write and read, which careers they enter, and how literature represents their experiences and aspirations. Miller looks to comprehensive departments of English that value studies of teaching, writing, and language as well as literature. He also examines broadly based institutions that are engaged with writing at work in public life, with schools and public agencies, with access issues, and with media, ethnic, and cultural studies. With the growing privatization of higher education, such pragmatic engagements become vital to sustaining a civic vision of English studies and the humanities generally.

Fighting for Life Cover

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Fighting for Life

Contest, Sexuality, and Consciousness

by Walter J. Ong

"Fighting for Life is a book about contest, the agonia of the Greek arena, and its roots in male life, especially academia. Ong describes this work as an 'excavation' which was prompted by his previous explorations of such areas as the characteristics of oral and literate cultures, Peter Ramus and his 16th-century intellectual milieu, and the early dominance and more recent decline of classical rhetoric in education. In Fighting for Life, he weaves the results of a year's study of agonistic structures running through the biological, social, and noetic worlds. Describing his text as an 'essay in noobiology,' the biological roots of human consciousness, Ong claims that 'contest has been a major factor in organic evolution and it turns out to have been a major, and seemingly essential, factor in intellectual development.' . . . The work is a valuable synthesis of a wide body of research and theory."-Rhetoric Society Quarterly

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