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Art et biotechnologies Cover

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Art et biotechnologies

Edited by Louise Poissant

Des théoriciens et des artistes internationaux présentent des recherches et des réalisations artistiques situées au croisement de l'art, de la science et des systèmes artificiels.

Art et politique Cover

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Art et politique

La représentation en jeu

Edited by Lucille Beaudry

Si les années 1980 ont correspondu à un reflux du politique et, du même coup, à une mise en veilleuse des débats sur l’engagement de l’art qui avaient agité le XXe siècle, il n’en reste pas moins qu’on a peut-être été trop prompt à en proclamer la caducité. La réflexion théorique sur les rapports entre l’art et le politique, qui avait pu sembler tarie, se renouvelle depuis une décennie en tentant de dépasser l’aporie des conceptions fondées sur la notion de représentation aussi bien que celles qui reposent sur l’homologie entre transgression formelle et révolution politique. Le présent ouvrage entend cerner ce point de tangence de l’art et du politique. Réunissant des collaborateurs appartenant à plusieurs disciplines, il présente une série d’aperçus sur la manière dont le théâtre, le cinéma, la littérature ainsi que les arts visuels et performatifs négocient, à la fin du XXe siècle, leur insertion dans le champ politique. Provenant d’horizons divers, mais avec un centre de gravité québécois, les auteurs sont historiens, critiques ou politologues; leurs études brossent un état des lieux de la création contemporaine. Si le primat de la représentation dans la lecture politique de l’art y paraît ébranlé, on constate que la représentation elle-même n’a peut-être pas perdu toute pertinence, dans la mesure où elle n’a pas cessé d’être mise en jeu.

Art for Daily Living Cover

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Art for Daily Living

The Story of the Owatonna Art Education Project

Edwin Ziegfeld

Art for Daily Living was first published in 1944. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.Art education has faced two great crises in one decade–first the depression and now the war. Out of the chaos and destruction of the early 1930’s came a critical evaluation of educational practices, which challenged art as it was being taught in the schools. the Owatonna Art Education Project was developed to help evolve a sound art education program that could justify itself educationally and financially as an indispensable part of education.Believing that art plays an integral part in the life of every human being, the late Melvin E. Haggerty, dean of the College of Education and the University of Minnesota, obtained a grant from the Carnegie Foundation to develop a new approach to the teaching of art in the public schools–and approach based on the study of a typical Midwestern community and its use of art in everyday living.

Art for the Middle Classes Cover

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Art for the Middle Classes

America's Illustrated Magazines of the 1840s

How did the average American learn about art in the mid-nineteenth century? With public art museums still in their infancy, and few cities and towns large enough to support art galleries or print shops, Americans relied on mass-circulated illustrated magazines. One group of magazines in particular, known collectively as the Philadelphia pictorials, circulated fine art engravings of paintings, some produced exclusively for circulation in these monthlies, to an eager middle-class reading audience. These magazines achieved print circulations far exceeding those of other print media (such as illustrated gift books, or catalogs from art-union membership organizations). Godey's , Graham's Peterson's Miss Leslie's and Sartain's Union Magazine included two to three fine art engravings monthly, "tipped in" to the fronts of the magazines, and designed for pull-out and display. Featuring the work of a fledgling group of American artists who chose American rather than European themes for their paintings, these magazines were crucial to the distribution of American art beyond the purview of the East Coast elite to a widespread middle-class audience. Contributions to these magazines enabled many an American artist and engraver to earn, for the first time in the young nation's history, a modest living through art. Author Cynthia Lee Patterson examines the economics of artistic production, innovative engraving techniques, regional imitators, the textual "illustrations" accompanying engravings, and the principal artists and engravers contributing to these magazines.

Art in Red Wing Cover

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Art in Red Wing

Lawrence Schmeckebier

What happens to the American small community in periods of war and challenge, change and uncertainty? In an age of planning, why not look at the community basis for planning? With these two questions as a basis, the University of Minnesota, in 1943, began one of the most exhaustive studies of an American community undertaken in recent times. Red Wing, Minnesota, on the banks of the Mississippi River in Goodhue County was chosen as the “typical small American city.” Professors of education, economics, sociology, art, home economics, journalism, and public health joined with city officials and civic leaders in studying every aspect of the city and its people. Their findings are published in eleven bulletins, each devoted to an individual topic. The entire survey, entitled The Community Basis for Postwar Planning, was coordinated by Roland S. Vaile, professor of economics and marketing at the University of Minnesota, and made possible by a grant from the Graduate School. The present study, Art in Red Wing, considers the public role of art and architecture in the reconstruction of the postwar Red Wing community; examining a variety of artistic expression including housing style, civic architecture, window displays, public sculpture, and pottery.

Art in Red Wing was first published in 1946. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

Art in the Lives of Immigrant Communities in the United States Cover

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Art in the Lives of Immigrant Communities in the United States

Edited and with an introduction by Paul DiMaggio and Patricia Fernandez-Kelly

Art in the Lives of Immigrant Communities in the United States is the first book to provide a comprehensive and lively analysis of the contributions of artists from America's newest immigrant communities-Africa, the Middle East, China, India, Southeast Asia, Central America, and Mexico. Adding significantly to our understanding of both the arts and immigration, multidisciplinary scholars explore tensions that artists face in forging careers in a new world and navigating between their home communities and the larger society.

Art Labor, Sex Politics Cover

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Art Labor, Sex Politics

Feminist Effects in 1970s British Art and Performance

Siona Wilson

Contrary to critics who have called it the “undecade,” the 1970s were a time of risky, innovative art—and nowhere more so than in Britain, where the forces of feminism and labor politics merged in a radical new aesthetic. In Art Labor, Sex Politics Siona Wilson investigates the charged relationship of sex and labor politics as it played out in the making of feminist art in 1970s Britain. Her sustained exploration of works of experimental film, installation, performance, and photography maps the intersection of feminist and leftist projects in the artistic practices of this heady period.

Collective practice, grassroots activism, and iconoclastic challenges to society’s sexual norms are all fundamental elements of this theoretically informed history. The book provides fresh assessments of key feminist figures and introduces readers to less widely known artists such as Jo Spence and controversial groups like COUM Transmissions. Wilson’s interpretations of two of the best-known (and infamous) exhibitions of feminist art—Mary Kelly’s Post-Partum Document and COUM Transmissions’ Prostitution—supply a historical context that reveals these works anew. Together these analyses demonstrate that feminist attention to sexual difference, sex, and psychic formation reconfigures received categories of labor and politics.

How—and how much—do sexual politics transform our approach to aesthetic debates? What effect do the tropes of sexual difference and labor have on the very conception of the political within cultural practice? These are the questions that animate Art Labor, Sex Politics as it illuminates an intense and influential decade of intellectual and artistic experimentation.

Art, Nature, and Religion in the Central Andes Cover

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Art, Nature, and Religion in the Central Andes

Themes and Variations from Prehistory to the Present

By Mary Strong

Taking a new approach to traditional Andean art that links prehistory with the present, this book illustrates the ongoing legacy of the past in contemporary art and the importance of art not only as a way of expressing religious ideas rooted in nature, but also as a means of resisting discrimination and oppression.

The Art of Conversion Cover

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The Art of Conversion

Christian Visual Culture in the Kingdom of Kongo

Cécile Fromont

Between the sixteenth and the nineteenth centuries, the west central African kingdom of Kongo practiced Christianity and actively participated in the Atlantic world as an independent, cosmopolitan realm. Drawing on an expansive and largely unpublished set of objects, images, and documents, Fromont examines the advent of Kongo Christian visual culture and traces its development across four centuries marked by war, the Atlantic slave trade, and, finally, the rise of nineteenth-century European colonialism. By offering an extensive analysis of the religious, political, and artistic innovations through which the Kongo embraced Christianity, Fromont approaches the country's conversion as a dynamic process that unfolded across centuries.

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The Art of Eastern India, 300-800

Frederick M. Asher

The Art of Eastern India, 300–800 was first published in 1980. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

Though scholars have extensive knowledge of the art that flourished during Pala rule in Eastern India (ca. 800-1200), little is known about Eastern Indian art during the preceding 500 years. This half-millennium includes the period of the Gupta dynasty and the two centuries that bridge Gupta and Pala rule, when no single dynasty long maintained control of Eastern India. In this study, Frederick M. Asher challenges arthistorical assumptions about Pala art — that it is a new school virtually without links to earlier art 00 by demonstrating that sculpture during the Gupta period and the subsequent three centuries evolved along lines that connect it with Pala art. In so doing, he draws attention to important sculptures, most of them never previously studied, that tell us not only about an unexplored period in Indian art but also about broader aspects of the cultural history and geography of Eastern India.

Asher's work is based on field research in Bihar, West Bengal, and Bangladesh. There he gave special attention to the sites of once-flourishing Buddhist monasteries and to Hindu images still worshipped in village India. The author's photographs of the bronze, terra cotta, and stone sculptures, and his detailed text, provide a virtual catalogue raisonne of the known works of the period.

Asher's analyses of the images and his attributions of dates to them are based upon close attention to artistic style and iconography, and the study of dynastic and social history, contemporary travelers' reports, and religious history. Drawing together these diverse strands of information, he describes the evolution of art forms over a long period in which there was little apparent historic unity. John M. Rosenfield, professor of art history at Harvard University and author of The Art of the Kushans, says, of The Art of Eastern India,"The scholarship is scrupulously detailed and careful . . . [The book] is in the finest tradition of classical scholarship, and will be consulted or several generations."

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