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La muséologie, champ de théories et de pratiques

Edited by Anik Meunier

Dans un contexte de globalisation impliquant un rétrécissement de l’espace et un aplanissement des cultures, comment la muséologie peut-elle repenser ses rapports, en particulier avec le monde professionnel ? La muséologie doit-elle être considérée comme une discipline autonome, une science appliquée ou un champ professionnel ? Quels sont les formes émergentes de médiation des savoirs et le devenir des fonctions d’éducation et de diffusion propres aux musées ? Ces questions sont abordées selon différentes approches. Les auteurs font le point sur la question de la muséologie comme discipline scientifique et tentent d’en déterminer les formes. Puis, ils s’intéressent aux missions et aux orientations de la recherche dans le champ de la muséologie, de l’éducation muséale et des médiations culturelles. Ils présentent enfin des projets de partenariat et des modes de collaboration entre acteurs sociaux, chercheurs et professionnels dans les musées.

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Les musées et leurs publics

Savoirs et enjeux

Pour mieux comprendre leurs publics et remplir leur rôle auprès de ceux-ci, les musées ont recours à l'évaluation muséale. Cet ouvrage propose un bilan des connaissances accumulées par la pratique de l'évaluation et dégage des axes de réflexion clés, notamment l'incidence du numérique sur la pratique muséale ou encore le manque de considération de certains résultats d'évaluation par les concepteurs et les décideurs des musées.

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Made in Newark

Cultivating Industrial Arts and Civic Identity in the Progressive Era

Ezra Shales

What does it mean to turn the public library or museum into a civic forum? Made in Newark describes a turbulent industrial city at the dawn of the twentieth century and the ways it inspired the library's outspoken director, John Cotton Dana, to collaborate with industrialists, social workers, educators, and New Women.

This is the story of experimental exhibitions in the library and the founding of the Newark Museum Associationùa project in which cultural literacy was intertwined with civics and consumption. Local artisans demonstrated crafts, connecting the cultural institution to the department store, school, and factory, all of which invoked the ideal of municipal patriotism. Today, as cultural institutions reappraise their relevance, Made in Newark explores precedents for contemporary debates over the ways the library and museum engage communities, define heritage in a multicultural era, and add value to the economy.

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Palace of Culture

Andrew Carnegie's Museums and Library in Pittsburgh

by Robert J. Gangewere

Andrew Carnegie is remembered as one of the world’s great philanthropists. As a boy, he witnessed the benevolence of a businessman who lent his personal book collection to laborer’s apprentices. That early experience inspired Carnegie to create the “Free to the People” Carnegie Library in 1895 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1896, he founded the Carnegie Institute, which included a music hall, art museum, and science museum. Carnegie deeply believed that education and culture could lift up the common man and should not be the sole province of the wealthy. Today, his Pittsburgh cultural institution encompasses a library, music hall, natural history museum, art museum, science center, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the Carnegie International art exhibition. In Palace of Culture, Robert J. Gangewere presents the first history of a cultural conglomeration that has served millions of people since its inception and inspired the likes of August Wilson, Andy Warhol, and David McCullough. In this fascinating account, Gangewere details the political turmoil, budgetary constraints, and cultural tides that have influenced the caretakers and the collections along the way.  He profiles the many benefactors, trustees, directors, and administrators who have stewarded the collections through the years. Gangewere provides individual histories of the library, music hall, museums, and science center, and describes the importance of each as an educational and research facility. Moreover, Palace of Culture documents the importance of cultural institutions to the citizens of large metropolitan areas. The Carnegie Library and Institute have inspired the creation of similar organizations in the United States and serve as models for museum systems throughout the world.

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Changing Conversations in Museums of the Americas

Selma Holo

Celebrating the diversity of institutions in the United States, Latin America, and Canada, Remix aims to change the discourse about museums from the inside out, proposing a new, “panarchic”—nonhierarchical and adaptive—vision for museum practice. Selma Holo and Mari-Tere Álvarez offer an unconventional approach, one premised on breaching conventional systems of communication and challenging the dialogues that drive the field. Featuring more than forty authors in and around the museum world, Remix frames a series of vital case studies demonstrating how specific museums, large and small, have profoundly advanced or creatively redefined their goals to meet their ever-changing worlds.

Contributors: Piedade Grinberg (Brazil), Nichole Anderson (Canada), Dr. James D. Fleck O.C. (Canada), Vanda Vitali (Canada), Lydia Bendersky (Chile), Andres Navia (Colombia), Manuel Araya-Incera (Costa Rica), Oscar Arias (Costa Rica), Alejandro de Avila Blomberg (Mexico), Marco Barerra Bassols (Mexico), Cuauhtémoc Camarena Ocampo (Mexico), Miguel Fernández Félix (Mexico), Demian Flores (Mexico), Teresa Morales (Mexico), Nelly Robles (Mexico), Hector Feliciano (Puerto Rico), Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru), Santiago Palomero Plaza (Spain), Maxwell L. Anderson (United States), Susana Bautista (United States), Graham W. J. Beal (United States), Jane Burrell (United States), Thomas P. Campbell (United States), Erica Clark (United States), Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh (United States), Kristina van Dyke (United States), William Fox (United States), Ben Garcia (United States), Ivan Gaskell (United States), Tomas W Hanchett (United States), Richard Koshalek (United States), Clare Kunny (United States), Stephen E. Nash (United States), Joanne Northrup (United States), Jane G. Pisano (United States), Edward Rothstein (United States), Karen Satzman (United States), Lori Starr (United States), Carlos Tortolero (United States), David Wilson (United States), Fred Wilson (United States), Guillermo Barrios (Venezuela), Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (Venezuela)

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Sacred Modern

Faith, Activism, and Aesthetics in the Menil Collection

By Pamela G. Smart

Renowned as one of the most significant museums built by private collectors, the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas, seeks to engage viewers in an acutely aesthetic, rather than pedagogical, experience of works of art. The Menil’s emphasis on being moved by art, rather than being taught art history, comes from its founders’ conviction that art offers a way to reintegrate the sacred and the secular worlds. Inspired by the French Catholic revivalism of the interwar years that recast Catholic tradition as the avant-garde, Dominique and John de Menil shared with other Catholic intellectuals a desire to reorder a world in crisis by imbuing modern cultural forms with religious faith, binding the sacred with the modern. Sacred Modern explores how the Menil Collection gives expression to the religious and political convictions of its founders and how “the Menil way” is being both perpetuated and contested as the Museum makes the transition from operating under the personal direction of Dominique de Menil to the stewardship of career professionals. Taking an ethnographic approach, Pamela G. Smart analyzes the character of the Menil aesthetic, the processes by which it is produced, and the sensibilities that it is meant to generate in those who engage with the collection. She also offers insight into the extraordinary impact Dominique and John de Menil had on the emergence of Houston as a major cultural center.

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Understanding the Arts and Creative Sector in the United States

Understanding the Arts and Creative Sector in the United States, Revised Edition

Edited by Joni Maya Cherbo, Ruth Ann Stewart, and Margaret Jane Wyszomirski

13 essays from leading experts, discusses international trade in cultural goods and services, discusses integration of arts and cultural policy on urban revitalization, civic engagement and historic preservation

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Whose Culture?

The Promise of Museums and the Debate over Antiquities

James Cuno

The international controversy over who "owns" antiquities has pitted museums against archaeologists and source countries where ancient artifacts are found. In his book Who Owns Antiquity?, James Cuno argued that antiquities are the cultural property of humankind, not of the countries that lay exclusive claim to them. Now in Whose Culture?, Cuno assembles preeminent museum directors, curators, and scholars to explain for themselves what's at stake in this struggle--and why the museums' critics couldn't be more wrong.

Source countries and archaeologists favor tough cultural property laws restricting the export of antiquities, have fought for the return of artifacts from museums worldwide, and claim the acquisition of undocumented antiquities encourages looting of archaeological sites. In Whose Culture?, leading figures from universities and museums in the United States and Britain argue that modern nation-states have at best a dubious connection with the ancient cultures they claim to represent, and that archaeology has been misused by nationalistic identity politics. They explain why exhibition is essential to responsible acquisitions, why our shared art heritage trumps nationalist agendas, why restrictive cultural property laws put antiquities at risk from unstable governments--and more. Defending the principles of art as the legacy of all humankind and museums as instruments of inquiry and tolerance, Whose Culture? brings reasoned argument to an issue that for too long has been distorted by politics and emotionalism.

In addition to the editor, the contributors are Kwame Anthony Appiah, Sir John Boardman, Michael F. Brown, Derek Gillman, Neil MacGregor, John Henry Merryman, Philippe de Montebello, David I. Owen, and James C. Y. Watt.

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With Éclat

The Boston Athenæum and the Origin of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Hina Hirayama

A detailed history of the Boston Athenæum’s historic role in the founding of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston The Boston Athenæum played a vital role in founding the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, a fact that is not widely known. This book details this important relationship, from its inception through the museum’s early years when the Athenæum’s continued support ensured the young institution’s survival. This historic partnership was remarkable in its intensity, intimacy, and informality, yet its details have never been fully documented. Based on extensive new research, With Éclat chronicles the joint endeavor in greater detail than ever before and places it in the context of Boston’s changing cultural landscape. This extraordinary story will appeal to those who know these wonderful institutions or are interested in the history of American museums.

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