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Memory Ireland Volume 4 Cover

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Memory Ireland Volume 4

James Joyce and Cultural Memory

edited by Oona Frawley and Katherine O'Callaghan

In the fourth and final volume of the Memory Ireland series, Frawley and O’Callaghan explore the manifestations and values of cultural memory in Joyce’s Ireland, both real and imagined. An exemplary author to consider in relation to questions of how it is that history is remembered and recycled, Joyce creates characters that confront particularly the fraught relationship between the individual and the historical past; the crisis of colonial history in relation to the colonized state; and the relationship between the individual’s memory of his or her own past and the past of the broader culture. The collection includes leading Joyce scholars including Luke Gibbons, Vincent Cheng, and Declan Kiberd and considers such topics as Jewish memory in Ulysses, history and memory in Finnegans Wake, and Joyce and the Bible.

Modern Irish Drama Cover

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Modern Irish Drama

W. B. Yeats to Marina Carr, Second Edition

Sanford Sternlicht

Modern Irish Drama: W. B. Yeats to Marina Carr presents a thorough introduction to the recent history of one of the greatest dramatic and theatrical traditions in Western culture. Originally published in 1988, this updated edition provides extensive new material, charting the path of modern and contemporary Irish drama from its roots in the Celtic Revival to its flowering in world theater. The lives and careers of more than fifty modern Irish playwrights are discussed along with summaries of their major plays and recommendations for further reading.

My First Booke of My Life Cover

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My First Booke of My Life

Alice Thornton

An early modern domestic and spiritual memoir, My First Booke of My Life depicts the life of Alice Thornton (1626–1707), a complex, contradictory woman caught in the changing fortunes and social realities of the seventeenth century. Her memoir documents her perspective on the Irish rebellion and English civil war as well as on a plethora of domestic dangers and difficulties: from her reluctant marriage, which sought to rescue the sequestered family estate and clear her brother’s name, to financial crises, to the illnesses and deaths of several family members and six children, to slanderous criticisms of her fidelity and her parenting.

 

This first complete edition of an autobiographical apologia begins with recollections of Thornton’s childhood and ends with the death of her husband, restoring almost half of the original text omitted from the nineteenth-century edition. The image she fashions of a woman devoted to God and family evolves from the conventional format of the deliverance memoir into a rhetorically sophisticated defense of her life in response to rumored scandal. Inseparable from the praise of God and family is the distinctive sense of identity that emerges from the introduction, text, and annotations, all of which provide a significant contribution to early modern woman’s writing.

 

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A Nation of Politicians

Gender, Patriotism, and Political Culture in Late Eighteenth-Century Ireland

Padhraig Higgins

Between the years 1778 and 1784, groups that had previously been excluded from the Irish political sphere—women, Catholics, lower-class Protestants, farmers, shopkeepers, and other members of the laboring and agrarian classes—began to imagine themselves as civil subjects with a stake in matters of the state. This politicization of non-elites was largely driven by the Volunteers, a local militia force that emerged in Ireland as British troops were called away to the American War of Independence. With remarkable speed, the Volunteers challenged central features of British imperial rule over Ireland and helped citizens express a new Irish national identity.
    In A Nation of Politicians, Padhraig Higgins argues that the development of Volunteer-initiated activities—associating, petitioning, subscribing, shopping, and attending celebrations—expanded the scope of political participation. Using a wide range of literary, archival, and visual sources, Higgins examines how ubiquitous forms of communication—sermons, songs and ballads, handbills, toasts, graffiti, theater, rumors, and gossip—encouraged ordinary Irish citizens to engage in the politics of a more inclusive society and consider the broader questions of civil liberties and the British Empire. A Nation of Politicians presents a fascinating tale of the beginnings of Ireland’s richly vocal political tradition at this important intersection of cultural, intellectual, social, and public history.
 
 
Winner of the Donald Murphy Prize for Distinguished First Book, American Conference for Irish Studies

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New Hibernia Review

Vol. 5 (2001) through current issue

New Hibernia Review/ Iris Éireannach Nua: A Quarterly Record of Irish Studies presents plainly argued scholarship on all aspects of Irish civilization. It seeks to address a readership of both professional scholars and educated readers as it examines, without political agenda, the cultures of the whole of Ireland. All disciplines are represented in the pages of New Hibernia Review; literary studies and history predominate. In additional to fully annotated scholarly articles, the journal also presents new Irish poetry and book reviews, as well as occasional memoirs and informal essays.

Other People's Diasporas Cover

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Other People's Diasporas

Negotiating Race in Contemporary Irish and Irish-American Culture

by Sinead Moynihan

With the economic rise of the “Celtic Tiger” in the 1990s, Irish culture was deeply impacted by a concurrent rise in immigration. A nation tending to see itself as a land of emigrants now saw waves of newcomers. Moynihan takes as her central question a formulation by sociologist Steve Garner: “What happens when other people’s diasporas converge on the homeland of a diasporic people?” Moynihan’s approach to Ireland’s changing demographics is, however, cultural rather than sociological; she delves into fiction, drama, comedy, and cinema since 1998 for its representations of and insights into race relations. She is particularly interested in how contemporary Irish culture looks to history of Irish-American and African-American race relations as a way to understand its own immigrant communities, arguing that “one of the most palpable trends in contemporary Irish culture is the juxtaposition, literal or implied, of narratives of Irish emigration to the U.S. with those of immigration to Ireland.” Individual chapters treat of bestselling novelists Joseph O’Connor (brother of singer-songwriter Sinéad O’Connor) and Roddy Doyle, and the comedian Des Bishop. A chapter each is devoted to Irish/Irish American drama and cinema.

Race and Immigration in the New Ireland Cover

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Race and Immigration in the New Ireland

Julieann Veronica Ulin

Although a number of books have addressed recent changes in Ireland that are related to immigration, both during and after the Celtic Tiger economic boom and bust, they are often limited by a focus on a single aspect of immigration or on either the Republic of Ireland or Northern Ireland. Race and Immigration in the New Ireland, in contrast, offers a variety of expert perspectives and a comprehensive approach to the social, political, linguistic, cultural, religious, and economic transformations in Ireland that are related to immigration. It includes a wide range of critical voices and approaches to reflect the broad impact of immigration on multiple aspects of Irish society and culture. The contributors address immigration and Irish sports, education systems, language debates, migrant women’s issues, human rights policies, and culture both in the Republic and in the North of Ireland. Further, authors offer a framework for considering this new Ireland in relation to earlier colonial contexts, reading intersections between new racism and old sectarianism.

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Remembering the Year of the French

Irish Folk History and Social Memory

Guy Beiner

     Remembering the Year of the French is a model of historical achievement, moving deftly between the study of historical events—the failed French invasion of the West of Ireland in 1798—and folkloric representationsof those events. Delving into the folk history found in Ireland’s rich oral traditions, Guy Beiner reveals alternate visions of the Irish past and brings into focus the vernacular histories, folk commemorative practices, and negotiations of memory that have gone largely unnoticed by historians.
     Beiner analyzes hundreds of hitherto unstudied historical, literary, and ethnographic sources. Though his focus is on 1798, his work is also a comprehensive study of Irish folk history and grass-roots social memory in Ireland. Investigating how communities in the West of Ireland remembered, well into the mid-twentieth century, an episode in the late eighteenth century, this is a “history from below” that gives serious attention to the perspectives of those who have been previously ignored or discounted. Beiner brilliantly captures the stories, ceremonies, and other popular traditions through which local communities narrated, remembered, and commemorated the past. Demonstrating the unique value of folklore as a historical source, Remembering the Year of the French offers a fresh perspective on collective memory and modern Irish history.
 


Winner, Wayland Hand Competition for outstanding publication in folklore and history, American Folklore Society
 
Finalist, award for the best book published about or growing out of public history, National Council on Public History
 
Winner, Michaelis-Jena Ratcliff Prize for the best study of folklore or folk life in Great Britain and Ireland

 

“An important and beautifully produced work. Guy Beiner here shows himself to be a historian of unusual talent.”—Marianne Elliott, Times Literary Supplement

“Thoroughly researched and scholarly. . . . Beiner’s work is full of empathy and sympathy for the human remains, memorials, and commemorations of past lives and the multiple ways in which they actually continue to live.”—Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Journal of British Studies

“A major contribution to Irish historiography.”—Maureen Murphy, Irish Literary Supplement

"A remarkable piece of scholarship . . . . Accessible, full of intriguing detail, and eminently teachable.”?—Ray Casman, New Hibernia Review

 “The most important monograph on Irish history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to be published in recent years.”—Matthew Kelly, English Historical Review

“A strikingly ambitious work . . . . Elegantly constructed, lucidly written and inspired, and displaying an inexhaustible capacity for research”—Ciarán Brady, History IRELAND

“A closely argued, meticulously detailed and rich analysis  . . . . providing such innovative treatment of a wide array of sources, his work will resonate with the concerns of many cultural and historical geographers working on social memory in quite different geographical settings and historical contexts.”—Yvonne Whelan, Journal of Historical Geography

Representing the National Landscape in Irish Romanticism Cover

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Representing the National Landscape in Irish Romanticism

by Julia M. Wright

Ireland is a country which has come to be defined in part by an ideology which conflates nationalism with the land. From the Irish Revival’s celebration of the Irish peasant farmer as the ideal Irishman to the fierce history of land claim battles between the Irish and their colonizers, notions of the land have become particularly bound up with conceptions of what Ireland is and what it is to be Irish. In this book, Wright considers this fraught relationship between land and national identity in Irish literature. In doing so, she presents a new vision of the Irish national landscape as one that is vitally connected to larger geographical spheres. By exploring issues of globalization, international radicalism, trade routes, and the export of natural resources, Wright is at the cutting edge of modern global scholarly trends and concerns. In considering texts from the Romantic era such as Leslie’s Killarney, Edgeworth’s “Limerick Gloves,” and Moore’s Irish Melodies, Wright undercuts the nationalist myth of a “people of the soil” using the very texts which helped to construct this myth. Reigniting the field of Irish Romanticism, Wright presents original readings which call into question politically motivated mythologies while energizing nationalist conceptions that reflect transnational networks and mobility.

Rethinking Occupied Ireland Cover

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Rethinking Occupied Ireland

Gender and Incarceration in Contemporary Irish Film

by Jessica Scarlata

Focusing on Irish-made films from 1960 to the 1990s, Scarlata considers the many ways in which filmmakers present the country as “occupied.” Exploring Ireland’s past in relation to its present, these films become a mode of postcolonial historiography, and, Scarlata argues, they are an important component in the re-evaluation of what constitutes political cinema and political resistance.

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