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The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Cian T. McMahon

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity.

From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.

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Great Deeds in Ireland

Richard Stanihurst’s De Rebus in Hibernia Gestis

This is a translation of Richard Stanihurst’s De Rebus in Hibernia Gestis which was originally published at Leiden in the Netherlands by the famous Plantin press in 1584. It was the first history of Ireland to appear on continent. The core of book is five parts – four chapters called ‘books’ and an appendix. There is also a preface and index. Our edition will consist of the Latin text with a parallel translation plus a scholarly introduction and extensive annotation.

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A Greater Ireland

The Land League and Transatlantic Nationalism in Gilded Age America

Ely M. Janis

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The Green and the Gray

The Irish in the Confederate States of America

David T. Gleeson

Why did many Irish Americans, who did not have a direct connection to slavery, choose to fight for the Confederacy? This perplexing question is at the heart of David T. Gleeson's sweeping analysis of the Irish in the Confederate States of America. Taking a broad view of the subject, Gleeson considers the role of Irish southerners in the debates over secession and the formation of the Confederacy, their experiences as soldiers, the effects of Confederate defeat for them and their emerging ethnic identity, and their role in the rise of Lost Cause ideology.
Focusing on the experience of Irish southerners in the years leading up to and following the Civil War, as well as on the Irish in the Confederate army and on the southern home front, Gleeson argues that the conflict and its aftermath were crucial to the integration of Irish Americans into the South. Throughout the book, Gleeson draws comparisons to the Irish on the Union side and to southern natives, expanding his analysis to engage the growing literature on Irish and American identity in the nineteenth-century United States.

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The Hallowed Eve

Dimensions of Culture in a Calendar Festival in Northern Ireland

Jack Santino

In Northern Ireland, Halloween is such a major celebration that it is often called the Irish Christmas. A day of family reunions, meals, and fun, Halloween brings people of all ages together with rhyming, storytelling, family fireworks, and community bonfires. Perhaps most important, it has become a day that transcends the social conflict found in this often troubled nation. Through the extensive use of interviews, The Hallowed Eve offers a fascinating look at the various customs, both past and present, that mark the celebration of the holiday. Looking through the lenses of gender, ethnicity, and religious affiliation, Jack Santino examines how the traditions exist in a nonthreatening, celebratory way to provide a model of how life could be in Northern Ireland. Halloween, concludes Santino, is a marriage of death and life, a joining of cultural opposites: indoor and outdoor, domesticity and wildness, male and female, old and young. Although current folk and popular traditions can be divisive, Halloween in Northern Ireland is universally considered to belong to everyone, regardless of their background or political leanings. The holiday is a dramatic example of how a community comes together one day a year, and these Northern Irish traditions capture the fundamental and everyday dimensions of life in Ulster.

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Handbook of the Irish Revival

An Anthology of Irish Cultural and Political Writings 1891–1922

Declan Kiberd

The Irish Revival of 1891 to 1922 was an extraordinary era of literary achievement and political ferment. This period generated not only a remarkable crop of poets and writers but also a range of innovative political thinkers and activists. The contributors to this period exchanged ideas and opinions about what Ireland was and could become, yet much of this discourse remains out of print, some of these voices almost forgotten. Handbook of the Irish Revival: An Anthology of Irish Cultural and Political Writings 1891–1922 collects for the first time many of the essays, articles, and letters by renowned figures such as James Joyce, Maud Gonne, W. B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, Sean O'Casey, and J. M. Synge, among others. The anthology also contains pieces by less well-known individuals such as Stopford A. Brooke, Mary Colum, and Helena Molony. Many of the lesser known texts contextualize the social, political, and cultural lives, values, and aspirations of those involved in and on the periphery of the Revivalist movement. The introduction and commentary by Declan Kiberd and P. J. Mathews convey the ideas of a brilliant generation that, in spite of difficulty and demoralization, audaciously shaped a modern Ireland. Divided into sixteen sections covering issues as diverse as literature, religion, drama, education, women’s rights, and the 1916 Rising, this is the ultimate reference book for anyone with an interest in Irish literature and history.

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The Historical Dimensions of Irish Catholicism

Emmet J. Larkin

In three short essays (first published as articles in The American Historical Review), Larkin analyzes the economic, social, and political context of nineteenth-century Ireland.

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Contested Ideas of Nationalism and History

Hugh Kearney

What is the Irish nation? Who is included in it? Are its borders delimited by religion, ethnicity, language, or civic commitment? And how should we teach its history? These and other questions are carefully considered by distinguished historian Hugh F. Kearney in Ireland: Contested Ideas of Nationalism and History.

The insightful essays collected here all circle around Ireland, with the first section attending to questions of nationalism and the second addressing pivotal moments in the history and historiography of the isle. Kearney contends that Ireland represents a striking example of the power of nationalism, which, while unique in many ways, provides an illuminating case study for students of the modern world. He goes on to elaborate his revisionist “four nations” approach to Irish history.

In the book, Kearney recounts his own development in the field and the key personalities, departments, and movements he encountered along the way. It is a unique portrait not only of a humane and sensitive historian, but of the historical profession (and the practice of history) in Britain, Ireland, and the United States from the 1940s to the late 20th century-at once public intellectual history and fascinating personal memoir.

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Ireland Her Own


This book tells the history of eight hundred years of the Irish people’s struggle for freedom. It takes us from the arrival of English settlers in the Middle ages up to the present –the struggle in the words of James Fintan Lalor, to make ‘Ireland her own, and all therein, from the sod to the sky’. The author describes this book as ‘An Outline History of the Irish struggle for National Freedom and Independence’, but it is much more than that. As an ‘Outline History’ it has no equal, and for several reasons. In the first place this is the only book in which, right from the beginning and throughout its pages, economic factors are placed in context with the political. Whilst many historians have written of this long struggle with pride and emotion, none has produced anything so effective as this memorable account taking in aspects of Irish social, economic and political history. The book describes the conquest and the first steps taken by England towards Empire in the twelfth century and brings the reader up to the partition of Ireland in the early 1920s. C. Desmond Greaves’ concluding chapter on the events from the then to the civil rights movement of the late 1960s and the start of ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland. The book is not only a clearly and vigorously written history, but also a guide to the history of imperialism in general and an invaluable handbook for students of politics

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Ireland in the Virginian Sea

Colonialism in the British Atlantic

Audrey Horning

In the late sixteenth century, the English started expanding westward, establishing control over parts of neighboring Ireland as well as exploring and later colonizing distant North America. Audrey Horning deftly examines the relationship between British colonization efforts in both locales, depicting their close interconnection as fields for colonial experimentation. Focusing on the Ulster Plantation in the north of Ireland and the Jamestown settlement in the Chesapeake, she challenges the notion that Ireland merely served as a testing ground for British expansion into North America. Horning instead analyzes the people, financial networks, and information that circulated through and connected English plantations on either side of the Atlantic.

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