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Swahili Made Easy

A Beginner's Complete Course

J.F. Safari

Publication Year: 2016

This handy book is a beginnerís complete course in the Swahili language, designed especially for foreigners. The book is a result of the authorís many years of teaching experience. It is divided into two parts: part one covers pronunciation; Swahili greetings and manners; classification of nouns; adjectives, verbs, adverbs, etc. in twenty-eight lessons and thirty-six exercises. part two includes a study of Swahili usage in specific situations (e.g. at home, in the market, on the road, at the airport, etc.); eleven further lessons and thirteen exercises; the key to the exercises in Parts One and Two; and a Swahili-English vocabulary of words used in the book.

Published by: African Books Collective

Title page

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Copyright page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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DIBAJI

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pp. vii-viii

Kiswahili ni lugha ya Afrika Mashariki. Maendeleo ya lugha hii yamekuwa makubwa sana hata kuifanya iwe mojawapo ya lugha maarufu duniani. Licha ya kuwa lugha ya wananchi wa Afrika...

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. ix-xii

Africa has more languages than any other continent. Swahili is one of these languages. It belongs to a group called “Bantu”. One of the characteristics of the Bantu languages is lack of articles and gender (masculine, feminine, neuter). The nouns in...

PART ONE. LESSON 1–28

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LESSON 1. THE SWAHILI PRONUNCIATION

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pp. 2-3

It is not difficult to pronounce Swahili if one observes the following rules:...

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LESSON 2. SWAHILI GREETINGS AND MANNERS

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pp. 4-6

Jambo is the commonest form of greeting used in East Africa. It is used from morning till evening to greet friends, relatives, visitors and strangers. It is a corruption of Hujambo? “How are you?” and...

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LESSON 3. THE CLASSIFICATION OF SWAHILI NOUNS

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pp. 7-10

Swahili is one of the African languages known as Bantu. One of the characteristics of these languages is the division of nouns into classes, and not into masculine, feminine and neuter genders. The noun classes are distinguished by their nominal prefixes....

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LESSON 4. THE SWAHILI ADJECTIVE

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pp. 11-14

In Swahili the adjectives agree with the nouns they qualify both in number and in nominal prefixes. With the exception of kila “each”, “every”, all adjectives follow their nouns....

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LESSON 5. THE MI-MI CLASS

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pp. 15-16

In this class we find names of trees, members of the human body, household articles, and some physical phenomena. Examples:...

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LESSON 6. THE KI-VI CLASS

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pp. 17-18

Nouns in this class denote things. There are a few nouns which denote living things (see Lesson Three)....

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LESSON 7. THE N CLASS

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pp. 19-21

Although this class is known as the N class, not every noun in this class begins with an N. The nouns in this class, however, have one thing in common; they retain the same form for both singular and plural, as will be shown below:..

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LESSON 8. THE MA CLASS

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pp. 22-23

This class has been named after its plural prefix ma. It has no singular prefix, or as some say, it lost it in the process of transformation common to all living languages. The singular prefix however, reappears in the verbs and possessive adjectives...

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LESSON 9. THE U CLASS

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pp. 24-26

The nouns in this class begin with u (or w before a vowel) in the singular. Most of them have no plural, and those that do have taken the plural formed of the N class. Many of these nouns are derivative, i.e. they are formed by simply prefixing u to the stems...

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LESSON 10. THE PA AND KU CLASSES

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pp. 27-

These two classess can be treated together, for they are simple and short. The PA class has only one word, pahali “a place” or “places”. This word is sometimes replaced by mahali, whose meaning is the same. Adjectives qualifying this noun take the pa prefix, e.g....

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LESSON 11. SWAHILI NUMBERS

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pp. 28-31

Numbers one to five take nominal prefixes the rest do not....

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LESSON 12. COMPARISON

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pp. 32-33

In Swahili, adjectives do not change in order to express degrees of comparison. Swahili expresses equality and inequality by using the following words....

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LESSON 13. THE SWAHILI VERBS

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pp. 34-38

In the infinitive, all Swahili verbs, as we have already said, begin with Ku (i.e. they add the prefix ku to the stem) which correspond, to the English word “ to in “to go, to come, etc…” Here are some of the commonest verbs:...

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LESSON 14. KUWA, KUWA NA, KUWAKO

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pp. 39-43

This verb is irregular in the present tense. It has only one form, ni, for “am, is, and are”. Nouns and independent personal pronouns are used with ni and its negative si, “am not, is not, and are not.”...

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LESSON 15. WHO? WHOSE? WHICH? WHAT?

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pp. 44-47

In asking questions about people, things, time or place, the following words are used:...

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LESSON 16. MORE ABOUT PERSONAL PRONOUNS

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pp. 48-50

We have already seen two kinds of personal pronouns: a) those that stand by themselves...

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LESSON 17. THE SWAHILI NEGATIVE FORMS

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pp. 51-55

Swahili uses a different set of subject prefixes to express negations. The idea of negation is contained in these subject prefixes. They are:...

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LESSON 18. ORDERS AND WISHES

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pp. 56-63

In Swahili orders are given by using the verb stem or in the case of monosyllabic verbs, the whole verb, e.g....

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LESSON 19. DEMONSTRATIVES: THIS AND THAT

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pp. 64-65

This, that and their plurals these and those are called demonstratives, from the Latin demonstrare, to show. In Swahili, demonstratives are of three kinds: Those that point to somebody, or something near; those that indicate persons or things far away; and those that show...

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LESSON 20. POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS

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pp. 66-68

In Swahili the possessive pronouns are treated like adjectives. They take nominal prefixes, as shown below:...

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LESSON 21. THE CONDITIONAL TENSES

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pp. 69-71

Swahili has four distinct tenses which express condition. They are formed with:...

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LESSON 22. THE PASSIVE VOICE

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pp. 72-75

In both sentences Tatu is the subject but she is not the doer in the second sentence. She is said to be passive. This is the passive voice. The first sentence is in the active voice. Tatu is the doer, i.e. she loves... In Swahili, the passive voice is rendered by...

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LESSON 23. THE EKA AND lKA TENSES

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pp. 76-78

The eka and ika tenses denote a state; something has been done to the subject but no agent or doer is expressed. Observe the following sentences and note the difference between the stative and the passive forms:...

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LESSON 24. THE IMPERSONAL AND THE RECIPROCAL FORMS OF VERBS

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pp. 79-83

kuna shows an indefinite position. mna denotes a place inside something. while pana refers to a definite place....

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LESSON 25. THE RELATIVES

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pp. 84-88

We have already discussed the interrogatives: nani? “who?” nini? ·what?” -a nani” whose? -ipi? “which?” etc....

LESSON 26. SWAHILI ADVERBS AND PREPOSITIONS

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pp. 89-93

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LESSON 27. HOW TO TELL TIME IN SWAHILI

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pp. 94-95

The Swahili day begins at 7 a.m. and ends at 6 p.m. It is called siku “day”. The night is also 12 hours beginning at 7 p.m. and ending at 6 a.m. From 6 a.m. to about 10 a.m. it is asubuhi, “morning”; from 11 a.m. to about 4 p.m. it is mchana, during the day·; from 5...

LESSON 28. NOMINAL PREFIXES

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pp. 96-98

PART TWO. LESSON 29–40

LESSON 29. TATU21 NA WATOTO WAKE NYUMBANI

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pp. 100-105

LESSON 30. TATU AENDA SOKONI

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pp. 106-109

LESSON 31. DUKANI

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pp. 110-112

LESSON 32. BARABARANI

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pp. 113-115

LESSON 33. TATU BAHARINI

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pp. 116-118

LESSON 34. TATU SERENGETI

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pp. 119-122

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LESSON 35. BARS AND RESTAURANTS

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pp. 123-124

Some people like to take some refreshments after visiting places like Serengeti, so here are some of the expressions you may need:...

LESSON 36. KIWANJA CHA NDEGE

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pp. 125-129

LESSON 37. KAZINI

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pp. 130-133

LESSON 38. SHULE YETU

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pp. 134-138

LESSON 39. SIASA YA TANZANIA

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pp. 139-142

LESSON 40. TATU AENDA POSTA

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pp. 143-145

KEY TO EXERCISES

PART ONE

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pp. 148-165

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PART TWO

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pp. 166-186

Tatu is a mother. She has three children: Mashaka, Chausiku and Sijali.Tatu lives in a rural area with her children. She has a garden of fruits and vegetables. Tatu gives her children nutritious food everyday: vegetables, eggs, fruits, fish, potatoes, rice, milk, meat, etc....

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VOCABULARY

Only words used in the exercises are given here. It follows therefore that the words in the lists of useful phrases should be learnt and referred to as and where they appear. The English-Swahili vocabulary list has, therefore, been deliberately kept short....

SWAHILI-ENGLlSH VOCABULARY

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pp. 189-226

ENGLISH-SWAHILI VOCABULARY

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pp. 227-237

SWAHILI NOUNS ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THEIR NOMINAL PREFIXES

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pp. 238-258

Back cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9789987082100
Print-ISBN-13: 9789987081790

Page Count: 272
Publication Year: 2016