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Bulozi under the Luyana Kings

Political Evolution and State Formation in Pre-Colonial Zambia

Mutumba Mainga

Publication Year: 2010

Bulozi under the Luyana Kings is a study of the Lozi Kingdom in Western Zambia in the pre-colonial period. The study traces the origins of the Luyana and the Lozi people; the founding of the Luyana Central Kingship and the invasion by the Makololo in the mid-nineteenth century; and ends with the study of the Lozi response to European intrusion at the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Bulozi under the Luyana Kings was first published in 1973 by Longman, London. After wide consultations at home and abroad, the book is now republished in its original form.

Published by: African Books Collective

Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-

Maps

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pp. vii-

Plates

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pp. vii-

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Preface to 1973 edition

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pp. ix-xi

By comparison with other areas of Zambia, Bulozi has attracted a good deal of scholarly attention. Professor Gluckman's studies of Lozi jurisprudence and government form one of the classics of Central African anthropology...

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Preface to 2010 edition

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pp. xiii-

Bulozi under the Luyana Kings was first published in 1973 by Longman, London. The book was based on a successful PhD thesis which was submitted to the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xv-xvi

The main contents of this book derive from a doctoral thesis presented to London University in 1969. In the acknowledgements section of the thesis my academic obligations are fully stated and...

Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-

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Introduction: Bulozi

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pp. 1-6

The Lozi live in the Western Province, formerly Barotse Province, in the south-western corner of the Republic of Zambia. In the west the province lies next to the Portuguese territory of Angola, and in the south it adjoins...

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1. Migration and settlement

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pp. 7-20

The Lozi traditionally claim that they were the first in the Plain and have always been there, and that they were the result of a union between Nyambe (God) and the female ancestress figure Mbuyu. Viewed within the historical...

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2. The founding of the Lozi State and the emergence of a Luyana central kingship

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pp. 21-43

In this chapter and the next an attempt is made to describe the Lozi State system as it existed before the Kololo invasion in the middle of the nineteenth century, and to show how this system had evolved. This is not easy...

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3. Colonisation of the Flood Plain and beyond

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pp. 44-60

The reconquest of the breakaway Lozi groups of Mwanambinyi and Mange by Ngalama (K4) was of great significance in that it brought the whole of the Bulozi Plain or Ngulu under Lozi control. The present...

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4. The Makololo and the fall of the Lozi kingdom in the mid-nineteenth century

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pp. 61-82

In about 1840, the Lozi kingdom was overrun by a group of invaders from the south known as the Makololo, a Sotho people originally of the Fokeng group. As a result of the military and political revolutions which shook South African...

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5. The decline of the Makololo and the Lozi restoration [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 83-98

Sibitwane, the original leader of the Makololo, died on 7 July 1851. After his death, the Makololo State began to decline rapidly, until in August 1864 the Makololo were completely overthrown by the Lozi seeking...

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6. The restored Lozi kingdom 1864-85

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pp. 99-120

These words were addressed to the pioneer missionary Fran├žois Coillard in January 1885, by Mulena Mukwae Maibiba of Nalolo. Mukwae Maibiba was looking back over twenty years of political strife, which had produced three...

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7. Lewanika and the survival of the monarchy, 1885 - 1900

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pp. 121-139

Lubosi's position before and after the revolution of 1884-5 was summed up in his change of names. Before the revolution he was Lubosi 'the escaped one', the unfortunate born in exile at Nyengo in about 1842...

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8. The extent of Lozi influence

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pp. 140-161

Lewanika's domestic policy was inevitably bound up with external affairs and relationships with the neighbouring peoples outside the Plain. The special environment of the Plain and its peculiar economic characteristics made...

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9. The Lozi response to European intrusion

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pp. 162-190

By the late 1880s the Lozi kingdom found itself caught in between the rival claims of the British in the south and east, the Germans in the south-west, and the Portuguese in the west and north. All around, independent African states...

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Epilogue

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pp. 191-195

To carry this study up to Lewanika's death in 1916 would be to go beyond its boundaries: by that date the Colonial era had not only arrived but its effects on the Lozi traditional structure were already substantial. Nevertheless, a few words must be said to finish...

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Appendix

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pp. 196-204

In a recent survey of the problems of constructing relative chronologies for African history it is clearly shown with what caution one ought to proceed. The rules are clearly stated; first-class fieldwork is essential and material must...

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Sources and field research method

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pp. 205-225

In the study of Lozi history up to the middle of the nineteenth century it is necessary to rely primarily on oral sources. No firsthand written sources for this period have so far been discovered; almost all written works available...

List of main oral sources: informants and Select Bibliography

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pp. 226-258

Index

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pp. 259-264

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9789982240321
Print-ISBN-13: 9789982240529

Page Count: 292
Illustrations: b/w
Publication Year: 2010