We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Local Livelihoods and Protected Area Management

Biodiversity Conservation Problems in Cameroon

Emmanuel Neba Ndenecho

Publication Year: 2011

Cameroonís tropical forest is home to numerous plants and animals. It is also inhabited by Baka pygmies who are foragers and Bantu farmers. These communities have developed forestñdependent livelihoods, cultures and religions. Destruction of the forest by commercial and state interests, subsistence agriculture and the harvesting of products has necessitated a considerable upsurge in environmental protection projects to conserve and rehabilitate ecosystems, forests, soils and water resources. Ultimately, the approach to conservation that is applied is the responsibility of the government and international development agencies. The case studies documented seek to demonstrate that a broader perspective linking environmental protection and human welfare is important for two reasons. First, it addresses the rights and needs of local people and more marginal groups in society. Second, it also ensures that fundamental conservation objectives are achieved in practice with the participation of local people. The book develop guidelines for a more integrative and sociallyñaware approach to environmental planning and project design and implementation. It outlines a participatory mapping procedure for the design and implementation of community forest programmes. This is a valuable book for land resource managers, environmentalists, environmental biologists, conservators, field workers and technicians involved with environmental conservation. With the professionalisation of courses in most universities, the book will constitute good reading for students of geography, biology, agriculture, forestry, botany and natural resource management.

Published by: African Books Collective

Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.5 MB)
p. c-c

Title page

pdf iconDownload PDF (85.2 KB)
p. i-i

Copyright page

pdf iconDownload PDF (133.7 KB)
p. ii-ii

Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF (141.0 KB)
pp. iii-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (97.6 KB)
pp. v-vi

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF (105.5 KB)
pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF (99.6 KB)
pp. ix-x

Tropical forest of Africa constitute nearly a fifth of the world’s remaining forest. The forest is the home to numerous plants and animals. It is also inhabited by Baka pygmies who are foragers and Bantu farmers. The Baka are hunter-gatherers. They sometimes cultivate staple crops or trade agricultural work and forest products such as medicinal plants, “bush meat”,...

read more

Chapter 1 - Social and Political Dimension of Environmental Protection

pdf iconDownload PDF (689.5 KB)
pp. 1-22

This study makes a critical examination of mainstream initiatives to protect and rehabilitate the environment in developing countries. It investigates the social dimensions of environmental degradation and regeneration, that is, the diverse and complex interactions between people and the environment. It thus seeks to integrate the physical and ecological with social, economic and

read more

Chapter 2 - Forest Based Livelihoods and Sustainability Issues in Protected Areas

pdf iconDownload PDF (764.5 KB)
pp. 23-44

The capacity of forests to provide sustainable employment opportunities is becoming the focus of greater interest worldwide. Unfortunately, research and information on forest-based livelihood and their effects on the sustainability of forests are limited at both local and national levels. The paper therefore, focuses on the effects of wood fuel consumption,...

read more

Chapter 3 - Population Dynamics, Livelihoods and Forest Protection

pdf iconDownload PDF (361.0 KB)
pp. 45-62

The study makes a critical examination of mainstream efforts to rehabilitate and conserve forests in Cameroon and concludes that technocratic blueprints will always founder when they come face-to-face with the real world of complex human relation in poverty stricken societies. These result from the failure to integrate the concerns relating to rights, needs and priorities of...

read more

Chapter 4 - Livelihoods and Threats to Biodiversity Management

pdf iconDownload PDF (855.7 KB)
pp. 63-82

The problems facing the sustainable conservation and management of biodiversity in Sub-Saharan Africa have tended to be defined in ways that do not lead to acceptable solutions. The chapter uses a combination of primary and secondary data sources to identify the problems mitigating against a sustainable biodiversity management in Sub-Saharan Africa. It posits that...

read more

Chapter 5 - Rural Livelihoods and the Management of National Parks

pdf iconDownload PDF (194.3 KB)
pp. 83-98

Korup is a biologically lavish area in the lowland rainforest zone of Cameroon. It obtained a National Park status in 1986 and has continued to suffer from anthropogenic stresses. The study seeks to assist in ensuring a secured ecological system for inhabited protected areas using Korup as an example, that is, to assess the utilization and sustainability of socio-economic...

read more

Chapter 6 - Contribution of Non-Timber Forest Products to Household Revenue: In Forest-Adjacent Communities

pdf iconDownload PDF (516.0 KB)
pp. 99-116

The use of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in the tropical rainforest management has received greater attention over the past two decades. They are collected from a wide range of ecotypes such as high forest, farm fallows, otherwise disturbed forest, and farmland for use as medicine, food and barter. People throughout the tropics rely on their harvest and sale for their...

read more

Chapter 7 - Forest-User Groups and Forest Dependent Livelihoods in Community Forests

pdf iconDownload PDF (1021.2 KB)
pp. 117-138

It is now being realized by development agencies that using state power to enforce protection status for forests has failed to come to grips with crucial social issues and has provoked conflicts which often undermine the possibility of implementing and achieving basic conservation objectives. This approach ignores the livelihoods of forest adjacent communities. The search...

read more

Chapter 8 - Gender Roles and Power Relationships in Environmental Protection

pdf iconDownload PDF (213.9 KB)
pp. 139-156

Divisions between men and women in access to natural resources and in their management and use are common in African land management systems. Women constitute the bulk of small-scale resource-limited farmers. Yet, cropland is often not directly under their control. It is usually controlled either by their husbands, brothers or fathers. Therefore, both tenure and...

read more

Chapter 9 - Ecological Planning and Ecotourism Development in Protected Areas

pdf iconDownload PDF (278.3 KB)
pp. 157-174

Game reserves and other protected areas are potential areas for the development of ecotourism because of their biodiversity, landscapes and cultural heritage of local or indigenous people. This study investigates the environmental sustainability of game reserves using a sample of the Kimbi Game Reserve. It assesses the potentials of the reserve for the development...

read more

Chapter 10 - Climate Change, Livelihoods and Protected Area Management

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.9 MB)
pp. 175-202

There is a growing recognition that natural ecosystems, both large and small, could provide a suite of ecosystem services related to climate change, ranging from protection against immediate physical impacts (rising temperatures, unstable climates, rising sea level) to providing additional insurance against the predicted instability of agriculture, fisheries and water resources. The...

read more

Chapter 11 - Sustainable Forest Management by Communities

pdf iconDownload PDF (173.3 KB)
pp. 203-220

Mainstream initiatives to protect and rehabilitate forests in developing countries have failed to integrate the physical and ecological with social, economic and political processes. In view of the paucity of data on the linkages between the ecological and social processes at grassroots level, there is a need to collect original data through field research. Understanding the...

Back cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.5 MB)
p. bc-bc


E-ISBN-13: 9789956717460
Print-ISBN-13: 9789956717545

Page Count: 230
Publication Year: 2011