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Le Marin Combattant devenu paisible

Thomas Lurting, William F. Ndi

Publication Year: 2009

The recent pirate activities on the horn of Africa have sparked interest in a phenomenon which in the years of yore characterised the high seas i.e. hostage taking. Combating this ill is the primary objective of the present treatise. Through his autobiographical narrative, The Fighting Sailor Turn'd Peaceable Christian, Thomas Lurting (1632-1713) distinguishes himself as one of the emblematic defendants of the early Quaker ideals for International Peace. In this treatise Lurting takes the fight for these ideals to the maritime scene. Most of the narrative takes place on board the Bristol Frigot, ship on board of which he was convinced. Despite staunch opposition facing the rise of Quakerism in the maritime milieu, which at the time was characterised by the spirit of belligerence, the determination of Quakers to die for their convictions, their pacific resistance ended up appealing to many a seaman who became convinced also. Numerous warring and fighting scenes constitute the ingredients for Lurting's plot development. And most especially the "...True Account of George Pattison's Being Taken by the Turks; and How Redeemed by [...], Without Bloodshed, Putting the Turks on Shoar in their Own Country...." Lurting makes of this episode the turning point around which he articulates his spiritual journey to illustrate the very Quaker ideal for an everlasting universal brotherhood and pacifism. Thomas Lurting was born in 1632, probably in Ireland. But he spent his childhood in London where at the age of fourteen he was impressed and forcefully taken to war in Ireland where he spent roughly two years. Upon his return to London, he was turned over into the Bristol Frigot, one of the war vessels belonging to Admiral Blake's fleet. On board this same ship he became convinced of the evils of war and decided to quit warring for the merchant service. He was however impressed many a times into the navy. He published his spiritual autobiography, The Fighting Sailor Turn'd Peaceable Christian. in 1710. Three years later, he passed away on the 30th March 1713, at the age of 81 in London and was laid to rest at Burmondsey. Translated and edited with introductory notes by William F. NDI, (Ph.D.) in Languages, Literatures, Contemporary and Translation Studies. Author of numerous articles and book chapters on early Quakerism and its influence on contemporary ideas and mentalities, world peace and politics, literature in general and the autobiographical and epistolary genres in particular. He has held teaching positions at the Paris school of languages, the University of Queensland, the University of the Sunshine Coast and currently teaches at Deakin University in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Published by: African Books Collective

Title and Copyright

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Contents

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pp. viii-ix

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Bibliographical Information

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pp. x-xi

Thomas Lurting was born in 1632, probably in Ireland. But he spent his childhood in London where at the age of fourteen he was impressed and forcefully taken to war in Ireland where he spent roughly two years. Upon his return to London, he was turned over into the...

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Preface

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pp. xii-xiii

Publishing the life story of any individual entails taking into account its literary, socio-historical, religious and other merits. The editor thinks Lurting’s meets these requirements...

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Introductory Notes

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pp. 2-9

The Fighting Sailor Turn’d Peaceable Christian… by Thomas Lurting is one of the key testimonies to the sacrifices that early Quakers made in order to obtain most of the liberties claimed by most western democracies. Most importantly, Lurting’s spiritual autobiography is an invitation...

The Fighting Sailor Turn’d Peaceable Christian: Manifested in the Convicement and Converstion of Thomas Lurting With a Short Relation of Many Great Dangers and the Wonderful Deliverances He Met Withal

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pp. 10-13

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To the Reader

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pp. 14-15

Since it hath pleased God to make way for me, through many very remarkable Deliverances and great Preservations, I am not willing altogether to keep silent; some whereof are mentioned in the following Treatise, which was first written for private Satisfaction, and now offered...

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The Fighting Sailor Turn’d Peaceable Christian

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pp. 16-57

In the Year 1646, I being then about Fourteen Years of Age, was impressed (or forced) and carried into the Wars in Ireland, where I remained about two Years in the time of the Long Parliament; then was carried to London, and I went into the Wars against the...

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A True Account of George Pattison’s Being Taken by The TurksTurks; And How Redeemed by God’s Direction and Assistance, Without Bloodshed, Putting the Turks on Shoar in Their Own Country, About the Eighth Month, 1663

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pp. 58-81

I, Thomas Lurting, was then George Pattison’s Mate, and coming from Venice, we heard that many Turks Men of War were at Sea, and that they had taken many English Ships; and it was much in my Mind, that we should be taken; and I was very much concerned, as well for the Men, as for...

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9789956715343
Print-ISBN-13: 9789956558209

Page Count: 98
Publication Year: 2009