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University of Hong Kong

An Informal History (2 vols)

Bernard Mellor

Publication Year: 1980

Published by: Hong Kong University Press, HKU

VOLUME ONE / TEXT VOLUME

Table of Contents

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pp. v-

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xii

... was first incorporated in Hong Kong as a self-governing body of scholars by the University Ordinance 1911, dated the 31st March 1911, a little over a year after its main founder and first Chancellor, Sir Frederick Lugard, laid the foundation stone of the Main Building. Its incorporation provided for the first of its faculties to be formed from the Hong Kong College of Medicine, founded in 1887. Its purpose was to be 'the promotion of learning, arts, science, and ...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xiii-

... in the University Library's Hong Kong Collection I lit upon a box full of notes exchanged in the I950S with the late Edmund Blunden, for a book about the University of Hong Kong we were hoping to write together, overtaken by the series of essays in The First 50 Years of 1962. Here and there in the text I expect I have used his ...

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1. A Community Enterprise

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pp. 1-6

It employs over 500 teachers of high repute, and they and their students and services occupy over 40 buildings of sizes in a range from two to 150 thousand square feet of usable area, in 70 acres of scarce land; and over 350 thousand square feet of floor space have been added in the last two years. It has a bookstock of more than half a million, including one of the largest collections there is, of perennial, ephemeral and ...

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2. Revolution in China

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pp. 7-16

Its founding in 1911 by Sir Frederick Lugard and others, expressly to help in a Chinese renascence, was in some degree part of a more general competition among foreign powers interested in securing strong educational footholds in China itself. Thus, without an outline reference to some aspects of the earlier story of China's relations with the West not only the reasons for its founding ...

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3. The University Idea

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pp. 17-33

The Warden when distributing the prizes last year alluded to the liberality of the ideas which were evident in the Peking examinations that year. That showed that China wanted a new class of men and a new class of learning ... I hope that Hongkong and this College may become the embryo University of Western learning, not merely for our own Colony but for the great and friendly Empire ...

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4. University in Embryo

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pp. 34-47

Over the two years in which the work of founding it progressed, he sought every opportunity to repeat them, modified in small particulars from time to time, in the form of appeals, despatches, letters, and memoranda to officials and organizations in Hong Kong, China, the East generally, and Britain, in fact wherever interest might be aroused in helping him with advice and money. ...

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5. Scholars by Examination

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pp. 48-61

Eliot had been succeeded at Sheffield by H. A. L. Fisher, one of England's foremost historians, and was himself a man of quite extraordinary intellect and scholarly diligence, with interests ranging between the forms and history of Buddhism and the Samoan sea-slug. His memory was not inaptly compared to fly-paper, to which any fact alighting stuck for all time; with this came a special ...

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6. Postwar Confrontations

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pp. 62-69

He agreed, reluctantly enough and probably under some pressure applied by his uncle the Treasurer, to turn his attention fully to the University and act as Vice-Chancellor during the period of Eliot's absence in Siberia and thereafter until Sir William Brunyate arrived to assume the office. The University's earliest graduate, Dr G. H. Thomas, had received his first ...

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7. The New Learning and Coming of Age

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pp. 70-87

It also brought an intellectual revolution whose aim was to make the final break with the forms of China's past; its roots were in the new patterns of education which had discarded the traditional syllabuses and examinations; its creed was the total acceptance of the Western forms of scientific method, expressed in a whole arsenal of published translations of Western scientific argumentation and ...

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8. Strains of War

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pp. 88-97

Then began an exodus of people and officials in flight before the Japanese advance west and north. In November they took flight from Shanghai, in December from Nanking. The Chinese high command moved west, first to Hankow which the Japanese invested in October 1938, and then to Chungking where it remained for the rest of the war. Those seeking refuge included the entire ...

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9. The Links Break

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pp. 98-105

It gave them a short but useful breathing space, time to make and carry out decisions which eased the lives of all the students in final year and of many others. It gave Sloss an opportunity to generate morale among his staff, of strength enough to take them, or most of them, through the debilitating trials of internment, of which much has been written elsewhere, and to show that it was ...

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10. A New Start

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pp. 106-119

After the interval of shock and the counting of dead and dying, the Japanese capitulated on the 14th August. The University began reassembling immediately, from internment and prisoner-of-war camps, and from China. Duncan Sloss made for Pokfulam forthwith to take preliminary stock of the situation. However prepared he was for the sight, his impression must have been ...

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11. Policy Making: The Keswick and Jennings-Logan Reports

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pp. 120-130

The secondary system had been hastily reassembled from its prewar remains, and in the vernacular sector these were the results of temporary measures. Upon these and upon the confusion which the refugees had brought with them, some sort of edifice of higher studies had to be built to satisfy the needs of students who had hitherto satisfied them in ...

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12. Golden Jubilee and Expansion

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pp. 131-144

Many of the schools' pupils who, in the previous situation in which entry numbers were largely uncontrolled, would have qualified for admission to the longer pass-degree curricula, but did not wish to face the new risk of continuing in school in order to fail the Advanced Level examination, and pupils who had taken the risk and duly qualified but were not selected for admission under the quota system, all ...

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13. Consolidation

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pp. 145-155

The void he created had been filled unofficially and to an uncertain degree by a committee of Deans and Registrar, who in this protean guise promoted the University's undertakings adeptly enough, but only by appearing to a nervous staff as suspiciously like a chorus of administrative usurpers. The succession of two caretaker Vice-Chancellors to which Sir Lindsay gave way brought no certain forfeit of the initiative this group had assumed; both of them were well ...

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14. Reform

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pp. 156-168

Rioting had followed demonstrations mounted against a proposal announced early in April 1966 to impose a small rise in cross-harbour ferry fares; this turned out to be an overture to more troubled times ahead, in which Hong Kong was put through one of its severest tests. In China a new 'Cultural Revolution' had been launched in 1965, in which the children and youths ...

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15. Modernization

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pp. 169-176

He was later invited to Singapore as Vice-Chancellor of Nanyang University to carry out the reforms in that University recommended by a commission he had previously headed. He was, moreover, of a Hong Kong family and a graduate of the Universities of Hong Kong, Oxford, and Malaya. The University had conferred upon him four years earlier the honorary degree of Doctor of Science, in recognition of his high ...

Select Bibliography

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pp. 177-182

Index (to Volumes One and Two)

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pp. 183-193

VOLUME TWO / ILLUSTRATION VOLUME

Table of Contents

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pp. v-vi

Preface & Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

1. The College of Medicine : forerunner of the University

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pp. 1-6

2. Founders, Revolutionaries, and Early Benefactors

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pp. 7-18

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3. Early Openings and a Grand Bazaar

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pp. 19-28

Mody's Main Building and the University were opened ceremonially on the 11th March 1912 by Sir Frederick Lugard, the Chancellor, just two days after he had laid the foundation stone of St. John's Hall. The photograph of the Main Building here was taken a few days before the ceremony, and shows the architect, standing on the steps, plans in hand. ...

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4. The Coat of Arms and Mace

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pp. 29-34

The design for the Coat of Arms has been assigned to Lugard, to Eliot, and to S. H. Ixer of the Public Works Department, who drew the caricature of Francis Clark, the first Dean (see Clinical Instruction section). A design was sent to the College of Arms in October 1912, with the suggestion that if more and distinctive emblems were needed, then the University ...

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5. The Three Ho Brothers

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pp. 35-40

He was later invited to Singapore as Vice-Chancellor of Nanyang University to carry out the reforms in that University recommended by a commission he had previously headed. He was, moreover, of a Hong Kong family and a graduate of the Universities of Hong Kong, Oxford, and Malaya. The University had conferred upon him four years earlier the honorary degree of Doctor of Science, in recognition of his high ...

6. Power and Lighting

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pp. 41-44

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7. Chinese Studies

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pp. 45-54

Tang Chi-ngong had an inscription placed in the hall of the School of Chinese building he presented (seen here in an early photograph) to the effect that it was to enable the University to fulfil this obligation. Sir 'Villiam Peel opened it on the 28th September 1931. The gift drew a further S2oo.000 from the Chinese community for the endowment of teaching in Chinese. 'With growth, ...

8. Clinical Instruction

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pp. 55-60

9. School Examination Centres

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pp. 61-66

10. From a 1930s Album

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pp. 67-70

11. War and After

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pp. 71-84

12. The Sporting Life

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pp. 85-96

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13. Outposts

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pp. 97-102

Outpost research has been part of the scene since the time of Professor Earle's medical research institute at Shanghai. In the early 19505 an expedition went to Borneo to study the forest canopy. The University maintained a fisheries research unit from 1953 to 1900, largely afloat. Readings of the earth's magnetic field in Hong Kong, first taken in 1884 at the Royal Observatory and later at ...

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14. The Lodge and its Gun

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pp. 103-106

While the foundations were being prepared on the old Victoria Battery site for a new Vice-Chancellor's Lodge to replace the old Principal's House, converted into four flats in 1948, a large naval gun or late Victorian design was uncovered. The new Lodge is pictured here; and also the gun, with Henrietta, Lady Banting, standing on it. Attempts were made in vain to persuade all branches ...

15. The Halls

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pp. 107-120

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16. Lions and Elephants

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pp. 121-124

The entrance to a part of the block of flats called High \Vest at Pokfulam is flanked by two cheerful, smooth-haired, granite lions out of breath. The wags call them Clementi and Lugard, after two of Stella Benson's bulldogs no doubt. They started life in the middle of the city in 1951 guarding the main doors of the Bank of China when it was being built and were two off our. 'Foolish, ...

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17. Golden Jubilee 1961

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pp. 125-136

The two main ceremonies at the Golden Jubilee of 1961 were a presentation of addresses, of which a selection is displayed on the following pages, and a congregation at which an honorary degree was conferred on Princess Alexandra of Kent, and a set of Legge's Chinese Classics presented as a gift for the Queen, the University's Patron. During a Jubilee Congress of six learned symposia, ...

18. At Play

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pp. 137-146

19. Honours

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pp. 147-150

20. Bones

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pp. 151-154

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21. Books

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pp. 155-162

When the new Library was opened in 1961 by Princess Alexandra, the stock had grown to almost a quarter of a million and is now over half a million, including a fine collection of Hong Kong material in a special collection. The Library entrance gives access also to the Students' Union and is always crammed with student posters and tables laden with books for sale. ...

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22. The Queen's Visit

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pp. 163-166

The reigning sovereign or Britain may by the University Ordinance be Visitor or the University and by tradition and on petition has been its Patron since its founding. The first royal visit was made by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on the 6th, May 1975. accompanied by H. R. H. Prince Philip. The Royal visitors arrived at the entrance to the University's Main Building ...

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23. The Encroachment of the Suburbs

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pp. 167-176

The building at the western entrance to the University was used as a dormitory for the minor staff until 1928, when Kwok Siu-Iau donated money to convert and equip it for biology. In the postwar years, when biology was housed in the Northcote Science Building, it became briefly a women's hostel, of which a sub-warden was Dr Elizabeth Tang, better known as the novelist Han Su-yin. ...

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24. Meetings

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pp. 177-188

Meetings are different from encounters, in that they have at least a fixed venue and a fixed beginning, though at some times they seem to be all over the place and at other times never to end. A great deal of the University's business is done in casual encounters along the paths, in the corridors, between lectures, but increasingly reduced to a couple of sentences imperfectly heard between ...

25. Nine Vice-Chancellors

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pp. 189-198

26. Demolishments

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pp. 199-202

27. Constructions

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pp. 203-209

Aerial view of the Main Estate in 1979 …

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E-ISBN-13: 9789882203013
Print-ISBN-13: 9789622090231

Page Count: 208
Publication Year: 1980