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A Documentary History of Hong Kong

Society

David Faure

Publication Year: 1997

This book puts together historical documents that illustrate the lives and concerns of Hong Kong people through a century and a half of colonial rule.

Published by: Hong Kong University Press, HKU

Title Page, Copyright

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CONTENTS

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pp. v-vi

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SERIES GENERAL EDITORS' FOREWORD

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pp. vii-viii

Impending changes in the political status of Hong Kong have in recent years brought about considerable interest in Hong Kong studies. Despite the very active publication of academic works and general books about Hong Kong in the last few years, there is still a need for a good scholarly general history which takes...

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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pp. ix-x

For permission to cite from their publications, the editor acknowledges with thanks Professor Chien Chiao, Professor Nelson Chow, Dr Elizabeth Johnson, Professor Ambrose Y.C. King, Rev Eric Kvan, Mr M.K. Lee, Mr Kenichi Ohashi, Professor Janet Salaff, Dr Janet Scott, Mrs Elsie Tu, Dr Thomas P. Wong, the Centre of Asian Studies of the University of Hong Kong, Chinese University...

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Introduction HONG KONG, COLONIAL SOCIETY

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pp. 1-14

Hong Kong was a China coast city. It was by and large a Chinese city. It was a metropolis. But above all, it was a colony. Hong Kong became a British colony from 1842. It outlasted most British colonies. Post-Second World War Britain lost its world power status and gave up most of its colonies; in the pursuit of an open door into Europe, it gave up even...

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Chapter One EARLY SETTLEMENT

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pp. 15-56

It is often said that Hong Kong was a fishing village before the British arrived on the island in 1841. The description raises the image of fishing boats and stakenets along the waterfront, ramshackle houses beyond the reach of high tide, fish — dead, rotting, salted — and shrimp and seaweed being dried on the beach, and men, women and children, many living on rather than off...

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Chapter Two

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pp. 57-116

For most of the Chinese people who lived in Hong Kong, Hong Kong was not home until they made it their home. Like the foreigners, they had come to Hong Kong as outsiders. Like the foreigners, they started out detached from their village and family, uncertain of the future in this foreign land, but...

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Chapter Three A CITY OF ENTREPRENEURS

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pp. 117-148

Hong Kong survived on its ability to trade; and trade thrived because the institutions for trade were put in place and because a mercantile community grew up in Hong Kong that actively sought opportunities for trade. Among Hong Kong's early merchants were the taipans of Western companies, the compradores who served as intermediaries between Western trading houses and the Chinese population, and Chinese merchants from...

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Chapter Four THE PEOPLED LIVELIHOOD IN THE 1920s AND 1930s

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pp. 149-208

When the First World War broke out, in 1914, Hong Kong had a population of 500,000. When the Japanese invaded Hong Kong in 1941, the population had surpassed 1,500,000.* It was not at all easy for Hong Kong to accommodate this very rapid increase in population, but a rapid increase in population was as much as asset for some as a liability for others. The...

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Chapter Five THE SECOND WORLD WAR AND THE JAPANESE OCCUPATION

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pp. 209-232

The Second World War took Hong Kong by storm. China went into war in 1937, Guangzhou fell in 1938 and Hong Kong fell on Christmas Day 1941. The Japanese occupation government decided upon evacuating a substantial portion of the Hong Kong population. Those that remained remembered...

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Chapter SIx THE RETURN TO IMMIGRANT SOCIETY, 1945-1966

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pp. 233-284

From the 1840s to the 1920s, Hong Kong the Chinese city established a foothold in the south China-Southeast Asian nexus oftrading cities consisting of Guangzhou, Foshan, Shantou, Hong Kong, Macau, Saigon and Singapore. Came the 1930s, when within a few years, upwards of half a million people...

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Chapter Seven CRISIS AND CONSOLIDATION, 1966 - 1981

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pp. 285-350

The signs were probably there even in the 1950s, that the simple formula of a colonial government assisted by appointed members and supported by loosely organized traditional communal organizations would not hold. Housing estates being built by the Hong Kong government were to house...

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Chapter Eight AFFLUENCE AND BEYOND

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pp. 351-382

The 1980s and 1990s wi 11 be remembered as a time of anomaly. The decision reached by the governments of the United Kingdom and of the People's Republic of China in 1982 on the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997 altered the fundamentals of Hong Kong's existence. The economic...

INDEX

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pp. 383-385


E-ISBN-13: 9789882201057
Print-ISBN-13: 9789622093935

Page Count: 400
Publication Year: 1997

Research Areas

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Subject Headings

  • Hong Kong (China) -- Economic conditions -- 19th century.
  • Hong Kong (China) -- Social conditions -- 19th century.
  • Hong Kong (China) -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
  • Hong Kong (China) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century.
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