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Anonymus and Master Roger

Edited by janos Bak

Publication Year: 2010

Contains two very different narratives; both are for the first time presented in an updated Latin text with an annotated English translation. An anonymous notary of King Bela of Hungary wrote a Latin Gesta Hungarorum (ca. 1200/10), a literary composition about the mythical origins of the Hungarians and their conquest of the Carpathian Basin. Anonymus tried to (re)construct the events and protagonists—including ethnic groups—of several centuries before from the names of places, rivers, and mountains of his time, assuming that these retained the memory of times past. One of his major “inventions” was the inclusion of Attila the Hun into the Hungarian royal genealogy, a feature later developed into the myth of Hun-Hungarian continuity. The Epistle to the Sorrowful Lament upon the Destruction of the Kingdom of Hungary by the Tartars of Master Roger includes an eyewitness account of the Mongol invasion in 1241–2, beginning with an analysis of the political conditions under King Bela IV and ending with the king’s return to the devastated country.

Published by: Central European University Press

Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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p. 4-4

Copyright Page

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p. 5-5

Contents

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pp. v-7

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General Editors’ Preface

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pp. vii-viii

In general, the Central European Medieval Texts (CEMT) series—which attempts to present in good editions original Latin narratives of the region together with up-to-date, annotated English translations—may no longer need special justification, now that this fifth volume has reached the “half-way mark” of the planned ten. However, the organization of the present one may...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xii

List of Maps and Illustrations

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pp. xiii-15

Anonymus Bele Regis Notarii Gesta Hungarorum

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Introduction

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pp. xvii-1

The Gesta Hungarorum of the anonymous notary of King Béla is the oldest extant chronicle of the history of the Hungarians.1 In his seminal study of the narrative sources of medieval Hungary, C. A. Macartney described it as “the most famous, the most obscure, the most exasperating and most misleading of all the early Hungarian...

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Here Begins the Prologue to the Deeds of the Hungarians

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pp. 2-130

P who is called master, and sometime notary of the most glorious Béla, king of Hungary of fond memory,1 to the venerable man N his most dear friend steeped in the knowledge of letters:2 Greetings, and the answer to his plea.3 When we were together at school reading with common purpose the story of Troy that I had brought most lovingly...

Master Roger's Epistle to the Sorrowful Lament Upon the Destruction of the Kingdom of Hungary by the Tatars

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Introduction

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pp. xli-131

The report of Master Roger on the Mongol invasion of Hungary is a rare text, being an eyewitness account of a major historical event in the thirteenth century. As such, it may be compared on the one hand with Galbert of Bruges’s twelfth-century narrative of the murder of Charles the Good, and, on the other, with Archdeacon Thomas of Split’s less immediate, but still contemporary account...

Master Roger's Epistle to the Lament Upon the Destruction of Hungary by the Tatare Written to the Reverend Lord James, Bishop of the Church of Preneste

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pp. 132-228

Select Bibliography

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pp. 229-242

Index of Names of Persons, Kindreds, and Peoples

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pp. 243-250

Index of Geographical Names

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pp. 251-262

Gazetteers of Geographical Names

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pp. 263-268

Map of the Mongol Invasiaon

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pp. 269-324

Map of Hungary with Anonymus’ toponyms

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pp. 270-325

Back Cover

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p. 326-326


E-ISBN-13: 9789639776968
Print-ISBN-13: 9789639776951

Page Count: 326
Publication Year: 2010

Edition: 1st
Series Title: Central European Medieval Texts