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Maritime Security in Southeast Asia

John Bradford, Tim Cook, Hasjim Djalal, James Manicom, Meredith Miller, Neil A. Quartaro, Clive Schofield, Sheldon W. Simon, Ian Storey, and Ian Townsend-Gault

This NBR Monograph examines maritime security issues in Southeast Asia, including disputes over resources, piracy, and other threats to strategic waterways, and draws implications for U.S. policy in the region.

Published by: National Bureau of Asian Research

Title Page, Copyright

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p. 2-2

Table of Contents

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pp. i-ii

Maritime Security in Southeast Asia: U.S., Japanese, Regional, and Industry Strategies

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Foreword

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pp. 3-4

Pirate activity in strategically important waterways around the globe, from the Strait of Malacca to the waters off the Horn of Africa, has garnered significant attention recently from states dependent on these waters for international trade and the free movement of goods. State responses have ranged from independently dispatching naval forces to patrol major sea lines of communication to multinational patrols and information-sharing mechanisms ...

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Safety and Security in the Malacca Strait: The Limits of Collaboration

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pp. 5-20

At 520 nautical miles long and extremely narrow at numerous places, the Straits of Malacca and Singapore constitute one of the world’s busiest waterways, linking the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea. Commercial traffic from Europe and the Arabian Gulf passes through the straits on the way to Northeast Asia; and maritime trade from the western...

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U.S. Strategic Interests and Cooperative Activities in Maritime Southeast Asiaa

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pp. 21-34

In 2007 the United States published a new maritime strategy directing the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard to prioritize both sustaining the capacity to win wars and building partnerships that strengthen security in peacetime. The critical strategic importance of maritime Southeast Asia and the nature of the security threats in that region demonstrate that this new...

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Japan’s Role in Strengthening Maritime Security in Southeast Asia

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pp. 35-46

Piracy in Southeast Asia, the one-time scourge of the region, may in time be remembered as a successful example of cooperation on an issue of broad regional importance. The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) reported zero attacks in the Strait of Malacca in the first quarter of 2010.1 Combating piracy in Southeast Asia is complicated because it pits...

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The Challenges of the Jolly Roger: Industry Perspectives on Piracy

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pp. 47-60

Piracy is not a new problem for maritime commerce, though it has been rare in modern times. Yet there has been a recent upswing in attacks, commencing in the mid-1990s with ship boardings and robberies in the Strait of Malacca region and continuing today, most notably off Somalia. Piracy has many forms, and so there are varying definitions. One of...

From Disputed Waters to Seas of Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers to Maritime Cooperation in East and Southeast Asia

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Foreword

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pp. 63-64

Outstanding maritime sovereignty disputes in East and Southeast Asia are among the greatest potential threats to the security and economic well-being of states in the region and around the globe. Major waterways, notably the East China Sea, South China Sea, and Gulf of Thailand, are vital to the free flow of trade and goods and contain both living and non-living resources that sustain the economies and populations of claimant and user states. ...

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From Disputed Waters to Seas of Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers to Maritime Cooperation in East and Southeast Asia

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pp. 65-93

The semi-enclosed maritime spaces of the East China Sea, South China Sea, and Gulf of Thailand host sea lines of communication (SLOC) that are critically important not only to the states of East and Southeast Asia but also to global trade. These waters moreover contain a marine environment of astonishing biodiversity that supports fisheries that, in turn...

Back Cover

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pp. 99-100


E-ISBN-13: 9781939131133

Page Count: 96