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Higher Education Financing in East and Southern Africa

Pundy Pillay

Publication Year: 2010

This nine-country study of higher education financing in Africa includes three East African states (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), five countries in southern Africa (Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and South Africa), and an Indian Ocean island state (Mauritius). Higher Education Financing in East and Southern Africa explores trends in financing policies, paying particular attention to the nature and extent of public sector funding of higher education, the growth of private financing (including both household financing and the growth of private higher education institutions) and the changing mix of financing instruments that these countries are developing in response to public sector financial constraints. This unique collection of African-country case studies draws attention to the remaining challenges around the financing of higher education in Africa, but also identifies good practices, lessons and common themes.

Published by: African Books Collective

Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. iii-

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Acknowledgements

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pp. iv-

Special thanks are due also to Dr John Butler-Adam, Ford Foundation; the Centre for Higher Education Transformation (CHET), Cape Town; and the Sizanang Centre for Research and Development, Pretoria, which coordinated the research. ...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-6

This multi-country study of higher education financing includes three East African states (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), five countries in southern Africa (Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and South Africa), and an Indian Ocean island state (Mauritius). ...

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2. Botswana

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pp. 7-28

At independence in 1966 and for many years afterwards, the lack of skilled and educated Batswana was one of the most significant constraints to development. At independence, there were few schools and educated Batswana as a result of the neglect of education by the colonial government. ...

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3. Kenya

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pp. 29-62

The development of higher education in Kenya cannot be discussed in isolation from the history of Kenya, as it owes its origins to colonial efforts at establishing a common system of education for East Africa. These origins can be traced from 1921 with the opening of a technical school on Makerere Hill in Kampala, Uganda. ...

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4. Lesotho

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pp. 63-80

The Ministry of Education and Training (MoET) is responsible for the management, provision and regulation of education and training in Lesotho. The education sector consists of four years of pre-primary education (non-compulsory), seven years of primary education, five years of secondary education, and three to six years of tertiary education. ...

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5. Mauritius

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pp. 81-102

Mauritius is a small island state situated in the Indian Ocean at a distance of some 2 000 km from the east coast of Africa. Although the total land area is small (2 040 km2), its exclusive economic zone is quite vast, covering some 1 700 000 km2 of the Indian Ocean. In 2006 the population of Mauritius was estimated ...

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6. Mozambique

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pp. 103-122

The first higher education institution in Mozambique was created in 1962 by the Portuguese as a branch of the Portuguese universities with the aim of serving mainly the children of Portuguese settlers. This institution was named Estudos Gerais Universitários and was upgraded to a university, ...

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7. Namibia

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pp. 123-152

Knowledge is a key engine for economic growth and social development. Namibia’s national development framework seeks to transform the country into a knowledge economy (ETSIP 2005). One key pillar of a knowledge economy is education and, more broadly, human capital. ...

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8. South Africa

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pp. 153-172

In the new democracy, South Africa’s racially-based higher education institutions were rationalised through a merger process into 23 non-racial universities. There are currently three categories of universities in the country: universities (those institutions that were defined as such during the apartheid period and remain so); ...

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9. Tanzania

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pp. 173-194

For the first seven years after independence in 1961, Tanzania retained the free market economy it inherited from colonial rule. However, a fundamental and radical shift in Tanzania’s development, economic and educational policies, including higher education financing policies, was made in 1967 through the Arusha Declaration, ...

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10. Uganda

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pp. 195-222

Uganda’s higher education system has its origins in the early 1920s with the founding of Makerere as a technical college to serve students from the British East African territories of Kenya, Tanganyika and Uganda. From its inception, but more so after the Currie Report of 1933, the architects of higher education ...

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11. Good Practices, Possible Lessons and Remaining Challenges

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pp. 223-232

African higher education is characterised by extremely low participation rates. With the exception of Mauritius and South Africa, this is true also for the countries considered in this study. Moreover, three key determinants – gender, socio-economic status and region – act to skew the already low participation rates ...

About the Authors

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pp. 233-

References

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pp. 234-242

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9781920355937
Print-ISBN-13: 9781920355333

Page Count: 246
Publication Year: 2010