We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Can Capitalism Survive?

Benjamin A. Rogge

Publication Year: 2012

Benjamin A. Rogge—late Distinguished Professor of Political Economy at Wabash College—was a representative of that most unusual species: economists who speak and write in clear English. He forsakes professional jargon for clarity and logic—and can even be downright funny. The nineteen essays in this volume explore the philosophy of freedom, the nature of economics, the business system, labor markets, money and inflation, the problems of cities, education, and what must be done to ensure the survival of free institutions and capitalism.

Published by: Liberty Fund

Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.1 MB)
pp. 1-3

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.1 MB)
pp. 4-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (647.5 KB)
pp. 7-8

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.2 MB)
pp. 9-10

One of the signs of advancing age in the American college professor is a tendency for him to write less and publish more. This seeming paradox is easily explained by the phenomenon of Collected Works, that is, by what on television...

read more

Part I

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.0 MB)
pp. 11-15

The basic ideas of this paper were expressed on a number of occasions and in various forms. It was ...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.4 MB)
pp. 13-34

These words were written in 1942 by Joseph Schumpeter, Austrian-born Harvard social scientist, in his prophetic work, Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy. Inasmuch as I intend to build my comments around this work, it might be appropriate for me to reinforce my own judgment of Schumpeter's...

read more

Part II

pdf iconDownload PDF (637.5 KB)
pp. 35-39

In this section I present those papers in which I have attempted to set forth exactly what I stand for and ...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.6 MB)
pp. 37-54

My economic philosophy is here offered with full knowledge that it is not generally accepted as the right one. On the contrary, my brand of economics has now become Brand X, the one that is never selected as the whitest by the...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 55-63

I intend to spend the next seventeen minutes answering a question that a disappointingly small number of people even bother to ask. The question is this: Just what is Ben Rogge's social philosophy? or to put it the way a few who have heard me speak have put it: "Rogge, just what kind of a nut are you?" This way of putting it, although accurate...

read more

Chapter 3

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.2 MB)
pp. 64-69

I n some 63 .7 percent of all interviews in my office, the person across the desk is there to tell me who's to blame. And in 99.6 percent of the cases where that is the question, the answer is the same: He isn't. Now if these were just simple cases of prevarication, we could all shake our heads at the loss of the old Yes-father- I-chopped-down..

read more

Chapter 4

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.2 MB)
pp. 70-80

I n these comments I offer three morality tales for your guidance, with the moral to be found in each tailored to the needs of my pre-existing biases. My first and third stories are laid in that romantic region, Posey County in Indiana's pocket country-once the haunt of Ohio River pirates and moonshiners. My second is laid in the...

read more

Part III

pdf iconDownload PDF (646.2 KB)
pp. 81-84

I n this part on the nature of economics, pride of place goes naturally to the paper on Adam Smith, the Father of Economics. This paper was first presented to an audience at Hillsdale College. In it, I make no attempt to conceal my opinion that Adam Smith is still the best of all...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.2 MB)
pp. 83-105

"To prohibit a great people [the American colonials] ... from making all that they can of every part of their own produce, or from employing their [capital] and industry in the way that they judge most advantageous to themselves, is a manifest violation of the most sacred rights...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.6 MB)
pp. 106-129

I wish to begin my discussion with some questions. What can we find in the Bible on the ethical rightness of the statement that two plus two equals four? What do the Papal Encyclicals tell us of the justice of Boyle's Law, that the volume of an ideal gas varies inversely with its pressure...

read more

Chapter 3

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.5 MB)
pp. 130-134

So that you will not be left in suspense, let me tell you immediately that the amount of subversion that takes place in college economics courses is probably much less than you may have imagined. The reasons for this are many; two of the most important are as follows : ( 1 ) In general, the level of teaching in economics (and particularly in the...

read more

Part IV

pdf iconDownload PDF (618.8 KB)
pp. 137-139

The two papers in this section deal with selected topics in the general area of "the business system," which occupies center stage in the drama of capitalist economics. "Profits" was presented to a group of businessmen and clergy brought together by the National Association of Manufacturers. The meeting site was Bermuda, and the clergymen and professors...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.1 MB)
pp. 139-151

"What has happened to profits?" My answer to that question is as follows: Profits have gone down. For those who think this answer inadequate, I can add the following: Profits have also been overestimated, overstated, overtaxed, underrated and misunderstood! Are there any questions? Of course there...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 152-158

I should like to begin with a paragraph from an article in a recent issue of the Wall Street Journal. The headlines read as follows: "Scorning business. More college students shun corporate jobs, choose other fields. Teaching, Peace Corps lure Harvard grads: company hiring quotas...

read more

Part V

pdf iconDownload PDF (567.7 KB)
pp. 161-163

This paper was presented at a meeting of the Midwest Economics Association in 1957. It was later printed in Business Topics, a journal published by the School of Business at Michigan State University. As you will see, its message...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.7 MB)
pp. 161-178

I n the paragraphs to follow you will find me critical of both the goals and techniques of trade unionism. Nor can I soften this position by announcing that, in spite of my sharp words, I am basically pro-union. I am not for "good" but opposed to "bad" (e.g., racketcontrolled) trade unionism.....

read more

Part VI

I n this section, I deal with that most ubiquitous of all diseases of economic life: inflation. As Lenin predicted, it is fast becoming the instrument of the disintegrating process in capitalist economies-though its ravages are equally visible in the socialist economies of the world. The first paper is one version of a long-runeconomic- outlook speech...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.1 MB)
pp. 183-194

The most probable course of events in the American economy in the next ten to fifteen years is the following: ( 1) continuing, in fact, accelerating inflation; (2) no major depression, but occasional periods of reduced real output (and hence employment); ( 3) off-and-on price and...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.3 MB)
pp. 195-206

The question before the house is whether inflation is caused, in whole or in part, by the exercise of private market power in the economy. So as to relieve what little suspense there may be, let me hasten to say that the answer to this question is "No." Inflation is not produced by the assistant manager of the A&P store who marks...

read more

Part VII

pdf iconDownload PDF (592.9 KB)
pp. 209-211

The following paper was prepared in response to an invitation in 1972 from the Center for Constructive Alternatives at Hillsdale College to be one of the speakers in a seminar on the general topic, "Recycling the Cities: Alternatives to Decay." I brought to the task little more than...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (4.3 MB)
pp. 209-238

I n the paragraphs to follow you will find me critical of most of the work now being done on the nature of the urban crisis and equally critical of the public policies proposed to ease that crisis. To compound my sin, I offer no alternative scheme by which the New Jerusalem can be...

read more

Part VIII

pdf iconDownload PDF (608.9 KB)
pp. 241-243

I served as academic dean of Wabash College from 1956 through August 1964. The college somehow survived the pervasive aura of disorganization that marks my administrative style and, in the meantime, I came under the necessity of doing some concentrated thinking on various issues...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (4.9 MB)
pp. 243-274

The purpose of this study is to explore certain current and expected problems in the financing of higher education in the United States. In particular, it will be directed to an evaluation of one method of solving these problems: the method of full-cost pricing of the services of higher...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 275-283

There is one topic to which I can address myself that should be relevant to your lives and about which I have a very modest amount of specialized, personal knowledge. Most (perhaps all) of you are going on to college. What can you reasonably expect from your college...

read more

Part IX

pdf iconDownload PDF (710.4 KB)
pp. 284-287

I f you have stuck with me up to this point, you may be weary of one paragraph of despair after another, of one diagnosis after another of the ailments of present-day capitalism. If you share, in whole or in part, my conviction that capitalism is the only economic system consistent...

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.4 MB)
pp. 285-300

The question before this house is not whether the survival of capitalism is in doubt (this is admitted). The question for us, as it was for Lenin at an earlier time, is, What to do? His concern was how best to hasten the collapse of capitalism; our concern is how to postpone or ward...

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.3 MB)
pp. 301-306

By the time this is in print, the election will be over and conservatism as a potent political force will be dead. A fine man will have suffered a humiliating defeat, and the liberals in his party will be planning a ruthless purge of all those who were closely associated with his candidacy. The...

read more

Chapter 3

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.3 MB)
pp. 307-320

The question before us is this: Has the Foundation for Economic Education, in its first twenty-five years, succeeded in its mission? Most speakers on such occasions are capable of supplying only one answer to such a question. Tonight, at no extra cost to you, I intend to give you...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 321-329


E-ISBN-13: 9781614878575
E-ISBN-10: 1614878579
Print-ISBN-13: 9780913966471

Page Count: 330
Publication Year: 2012

Edition: None

Research Areas

Recommend

UPCC logo
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access