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Further Reflections on the Revolution in France

Edmund Burke

Publication Year: 2012

In his famous Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), Edmund Burke excoriated French revolutionary leaders for recklessly destroying France's venerable institutions and way of life. But his war against the French intelligentsia did not end there, and Burke continued to take pen in hand against the Jacobins until his death in 1797.

This new collection brings together for the first time Burke's most important essays and letters on the French Revolution. There are seven items in the collection. Taken together, they anticipate, refine, and embellish Burke's Reflections. Included are Burke's "Letter to a Member of the National Assembly," in which he assails Jean Jacques Rousseau, the patron saint of the French Revolution; Burke's "Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs," in which he presents his classic defense of the Glorious Revolution of 1688; and his "A Letter to a Noble Lord," in which he defends his life and career against his detractors and, according to John Morley, writes "the most splendid repartee in the English language."

A foreword and headnotes to each selection point the reader to some of the key issues.

Daniel E. Ritchie is Professor of English Literature at Bethel College.

Published by: Liberty Fund

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 1-4

CONTENTS

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pp. 5-6

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FOREWORD

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pp. vii-xix

In the two hundred years since Edmund Burke produced his writings on the French Revolution, the question of how to achieve liberty within a good society has remained a pressing one. Simon Schama's masterful chronicle of the French Revolution, Citizens, argues that the Revolution attempted...

EDITOR'S NOTE

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pp. xxi-xxii

LIST OF SHORT TITLES

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pp. xxiii-26

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1. LETTER TO CHARLES-JEAN-FRANÇOIS DEPONT

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pp. 3-17

Edmund Burke's letter to Charles-Jean-François Depont (1767-1796) is his first extensive analysis of the French Revolution. Written just four months after the fall of the Bastille, when many Englishmen were uncertain in their opinions of the events in France, the letter is striking for the certainty...

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2. LETTER TO PHILIP FRANCIS

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pp. 19-26

Burke grew increasingly alarmed over his colleagues' favorable view of the French Revolution. His friend and political ally Philip Francis apparently gave credence to the poisonous propaganda that had been issuing for a decade about the sexual appetite of the Queen of France...

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3. A LETTER TO A MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

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pp. 27-72

Le recipient of A Letter to a Member of the National Assembly was François-Louis-Thibaut de Menon ville. The opening paragraphs, which refer to Menonville's response (Corr. Copeland 6: 162-169) to Burke's Reflections, acknowledge and then dismiss most of Menonville's criticisms...

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4. AN APPEAL FROM THE NEW TO THE OLD WHIGS

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pp. 73-201

The events of the spring and summer of 1791 were climacteric for Edmund Burke. His increasing alienation from his fellow Whigs finally issued in a rupture between him and the party's leader, Charles James Fox, during the debates on the Quebec Bill on May 6 and 11. It gradually became apparent...

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5. THOUGHTS ON FRENCH AFFAIRS

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pp. 203-255

After the breach with Fox and the leadership of the Whig party in May 1791, Burke's independence gave him more freedom to influence opinion, as he saw fit, among Tory ministers and disenchanted Whigs. Between 1791 and 1793 he wrote three works—Thoughts on French Affairs, Heads for...

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6. LETTER TO WILLIAM ELLIOT

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pp. 257-276

As the revolutionary decade wore on, Burke grew increasingly despondent over the aptitude of the British revolutionaries for forming clubs, societies, and informal ideological alliances, while his political allies either languished or lashed out in shortsighted reaction. Burke had hoped his son Richard...

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7. A LETTER TO A NOBLE LORD

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pp. 277-326

When Burke retired from Parliament in June 1794, his finances were, as always, in a perilous state. Members of Parliament were not paid for their service. A member could hope to earn money for his labors only if, while his party was in power, he was chosen for a government post. The Rockingham...

INDEX

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pp. 327-343


E-ISBN-13: 9781614877837
E-ISBN-10: 1614877831
Print-ISBN-13: 9780865970991

Page Count: 361
Publication Year: 2012

Edition: None

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Subject Headings

  • Burke, Edmund, 1729-1797 -- Correspondence.
  • France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Foreign public opinion, British.
  • Public opinion -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century.
  • Burke, Edmund, 1729-1797. Reflections on the Revolution in France.
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