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Prairie Ghost

Pronghorn and Human Interaction in Early America

Richard E. McCabe, Henry M. Reeves, Bart W. O'Gara

Publication Year: 2010

A Wildlife Management Institute Book

In this lavishly illustrated volume Richard E. McCabe, Bart W. O'Gara and Henry M. Reeves explore the fascinating relationship of pronghorn with people in early America, from prehistoric evidence through the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876. The only one of fourteen pronghorn-like genera to survive the great extinction brought on by human migration into North America, the pronghorn has a long and unique history of interaction with humans on the continent, a history that until now has largely remained unwritten.

 With nearly 150 black-and-white photographs, 16 pages of color illustrations, plus original artwork by Daniel P. Metz, Prairie Ghost: Pronghorn and Human Interaction in Early America tells the intriguing story of humans and these elusive big game mammals in an informative and entertaining fashion that will appeal to historians, biologists, sportsmen and the general reader alike.

Winner of the Wildlife Society's Outstanding Book Award for 2005

Published by: University Press of Colorado

Dedication

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pp. 8-9

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures

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pp. ix-x

Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Foreword

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pp. xiii-xiv

What a strange, timid and elusive creature the pronghorn was to the Euro-Americans who first broached North America’s western grasslands. It reminded them of a “cabri,” or goat, sort of—a very speedy goat. It was difficult to approach, difficult to kill and, when...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xvi

The least known, least understood and perhaps most fascinating big game animal in the Western Hemisphere is the pronghorn. Ironically, it is the most “American” of the continent’s terrestrial wildlife. The pronghorn is found only in North America and is the sole living member of an ancient family,...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-23

The authors are grateful for the help, cooperation and enthusiasm extended us by a great many people during the course of preparing this book. In particular, we recognize Glenna J. Dean and staffs of the Valley Library, Oregon State University, Corvallis, the Bancroft Library, University...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-2

Early in wecukanheyaye of a sweltering day of Wípazuk wašté wi in the year remembered as Pehin Hanksa ktepi, fewer than 500 akiæita oeuktayka, led by vainglorious Hi-es-tze, fell upside down into a huge village of Tsististas and Lakota temporarily encamped along a 3-mile (...

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Prehistory

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pp. 3-32

Successors of the Sublette pronghorn herd still migrate annually between Grand Teton National Park and their winter ranges south of Pinedale, Wyoming, as they have for 8,000 years or more. During particularly severe winters, they continue southward to...

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History

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pp. 33-133

An aspect of pronghorn history of minor practical importance is identification of which humans first saw or recorded the species. By the time Old World explorers visited pronghorn range and observed this species unknown to the rest of the world, the animal had been well known...

Appendix A. SELECT EYEWITNESS, HISTORIC ACCOUNTS OF PRONGHORN ABUNDANCE IN THE WEST

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pp. 135-142

Appendix B. SELECT NATIVE AMERICAN NAMES FOR PRONGHORN

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pp. 143-150

References

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pp. 151-169

Index

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pp. 171-175


E-ISBN-13: 9781607321118
E-ISBN-10: 1607321114
Print-ISBN-13: 9780870819544
Print-ISBN-10: 0870819542

Page Count: 208
Publication Year: 2010

Series Editor Byline: John Smith, Will Wordsworth