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Antigone, in Her Unbearable Splendor

New Essays on Jacques Lacan's The Ethics of Psychoanalysis

Charles Freeland

Publication Year: 2013

A study of Lacan’s engagement with the Western philosophical traditions of ethical and political thought in his seventh seminar and later work.

Published by: State University of New York Press

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

“To essay” means “to attempt.” Hence, the following may be read as “attempts” at a philosophical reading of a difficult subject: namely, the place, the role, and the function of “ethics” in Lacanian psychoanalysis. Such a subject is best approached with a hypothesis, and my hypothesis is that especially in his seventh seminar, ...

List of Abbreviations of Works by Jacques Lacan

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Antigone, in her unbearable splendor: My title speaks from the heart of this book. These words, taken from Lacan’s seventh seminar, The Ethics of Psychoanalysis, not only comprise the title to one of the central essays in this collection, they are also the words, the image and the enigma, the epiphany, ...

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Chapter 1: Toward an Ethics of Psychoanalysis

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pp. 13-34

The Ethics of Psychoanalysis is a curious little book. Curious for the way it came to be as a book, and curious, also, for what it attempts to achieve, for the headings, for the ends at which it may be said to aim. Much like Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, it, too, is based on student lecture notes, stenographer’s notes in this case, ...

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Chapter 2: Philosophy’s Preparation for Death

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pp. 35-50

It might seem that Lacan is not really interested in ethics at all. He says that he is not looking for a new route to human happiness and well-being. Nor does he wish to refine Kant’s deontological ethic with a new determination of the moral law and its relation to desire. Certainly, Lacan does raise these questions, ...

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Chapter 3: The “Truth about Truth”

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pp. 51-96

In his concern for truth, in the many ways he posed the question and the questioning of truth, Lacan was perhaps the one psychoanalyst and structuralist closest to philosophy. Certainly more so than Lévi-Strauss or Roland Barthes, Lacan’s conceptualization of the analytic situation was much more “philosophical,” ...

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Chapter 4: The Knots of Moral Law and Desire

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pp. 97-144

Lacan’s Seminar VII can be situated apropos the European Enlightenments, first that of classical Greece, the tradition that culminates in Plato and Aristotle, and second, that of the eighteenth-century, the tradition that culminates in Kant and Sade. But, it is also Lacan himself who makes this connection. ...

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Chapter 5: Antigone, in Her Unbearable Splendor

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pp. 145-186

In his seventh seminar, The Ethics of Psychoanalysis, one of Lacan’s declared purposes is to prepare the way toward a new “ethics of psychoanalysis” by first articulating a “demythologization” of the European philosophical ethical tradition. In pursuit of this, he often makes references not only to scientific and clinical observations, ...

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Chapter 6: The Desire for Happiness and the Promise of Analysis: Aristotle and Lacan on the Ethics of Desire

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pp. 187-238

One of the last sessions in The Ethics of Psychoanalysis, given at the very end of June in 1960, is entitled “The Demand for Happiness and the Promise of Analysis.” One of the upshots of Lacan’s teachings, and particularly when it comes to his discussion of the “promises” and the “ends” of analysis, ...

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Chapter 7: To Conclude / Not to Conclude

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pp. 239-280

This essay is intended as the conclusion for this series of essays. It attempts a positive formulation of Lacan’s ethics as an ethics that must be “wellspoken,” and shows what this means against the background of a Lacanian anti-philosophy, an issue brought into focus by reading Alain Badiou’s “Formules de l’Étourdit.” ...

Notes

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pp. 281-296

References

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pp. 297-306

Index

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pp. 307-316


E-ISBN-13: 9781438446509
Print-ISBN-13: 9781438446493

Page Count: 328
Publication Year: 2013