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Cannibal Encounters

Europeans and Island Caribs, 1492–1763

Philip P. Boucher

Publication Year: 1992

Philip Boucher analyzes the images—and the realities—of European relations with the people known as Island Caribs during the first three centuries after Columbus. Based on literary sources, travelers' observations, and missionary accounts, as well as on French and English colonial archives and administrative correspondence, Cannibal Encounters offers a vivid portrait of a troubled chapter in the history of European-Amerindian relations.

Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press

Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. vii-

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface to the Paperback Edition

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pp. xi-xiv

IN THE SUMMER OF 2007, as I read through the edited manuscript of my forthcoming book France and the American Tropics to ijoo: Tropics of Discontent?, I was struck that the material in the new book describing the Island Caribs (or Kalinago) differed only very slightly from the discussion in my 1992 book...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xvi

REFERRING TO THE persistent Anglo-French disputes concerning their Caribbean possessions, the eighteenth-century historian Bryan Edwards asserted: "The disputes and hostilities, which these attempts of the English on the one hand, and resistance of the French on the other, gave rise to, in this part of the world, are...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

REFERRING TO THE persistent Anglo-French disputes concerning their Caribbean possessions, the eighteenth-century historian Bryan Edwards asserted: "The disputes and hostilities, which these attempts of the English on the one hand, and resistance of the French on the other, gave rise to, in this part of the world, are...

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ONE: First Impressions: Europeans and Island Caribs in the Precolonial Era, 1492–1623

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pp. 13-30

FOR MORE THAN a century before the English and French colonized the Carib-dominated Lesser Antilles, Europeans possessed significant information— and misinformation—about these "cannibals." In Europe, the literary elite became familiar with Hispanic tales of horror about fierce man-eating opponents of...

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TWO: Realpolitik Caribbean Style: Euro-Carib Relations during the European Invasion, 1623–1660

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pp. 31-60

AFTER SOME SEVENTY years of sporadic commercial and cultural contacts with the Island Caribs, northern Europeans established permanent residence in the Lesser Antilles during the 16205. Within a strategic context of increasing Dutch, French, and English animosity toward Spain, the principal impulse to this shift...

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THREE: Between Lion and Rooster: The Island Carib Struggle for Autonomy, 1660–1688

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pp. 61-93

IN THE BEST of all possible worlds the post-i66o relations between Europeans and Island Caribs would have left but blank pages for future historians. If the French and English had respected the 1660 treaty and if all Island Caribs had understood and accepted its terms, then there wouldn't be much left to say. Neither...

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FOUR: "As if no such people existed": Island Caribs in Decline, 1689–1763

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pp. 94-107

THE ISLAND CARIBS ceased to play a major role in intercolonial conflicts in the Lesser Antilles during the years 1689-1763. The numbers of these once-feared warriors declined rapidly in this era due to a combination of disease, suicide, and perhaps most of all, retreat to the South American mainland to avoid the...

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FIVE: Age of Iron to Age of Sentimentality: Island Caribs in the European Literary Imagination, 1660s–1760s

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pp. 108-129

DESPITE THE GRADUAL disappearance of Island Caribs in the century spanning the i66os to the 17605, their impact on European literature increased. Thanks to their countrymen's frequent contact with Island Caribs, French writers had available...

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Conclusion

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pp. 130-134

THE TREATY OF Paris in 1763 gave the British control of the Neutral Islands: Dominica, St. Vincent, and Tobago. During the subseqent four decades, British settlers and authorities steadily reduced the French and Carib presence in these islands. The quite numerous French settlers (or, in British...

Notes

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pp. 135-178

Bibliography

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pp. 179-208

Index

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pp. 209-217


E-ISBN-13: 9781421401645
E-ISBN-10: 1421401649
Print-ISBN-13: 9780801890994
Print-ISBN-10: 0801890993

Page Count: 232
Illustrations: 13 halftones
Publication Year: 1992

Series Title: Johns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic History and Culture

Research Areas

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Subject Headings

  • Indians in literature.
  • England -- Colonies -- Administration.
  • France -- Colonies -- Administration.
  • Island Carib Indians -- First contact with Europeans.
  • Island Carib Indians -- Government relations.
  • Island Carib Indians -- History.
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