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The Carnegie Maya II

Carnegie Institution of Washington Current Reports, 1952-1957

Edited by John M. Weeks, Foreword by Marilyn Masson

Publication Year: 2011

"Thanks to Weeks, Masson, and the University Press of Colorado, Maya scholars now have an invaluable integrated resource. A vital resource for Maya specialists and Mesoamerican reserach libraries."—.C. Kolb, CHOICE

2006, the University Press of Colorado published The Carnegie Maya: The Carnegie Institution of Washington Maya Research Program, 1913-1957. This volume made available once again to scholars the extensive data published in the CIW Year Book series. The Carnegie Maya II: Carnegie Institution of Washington Current Reports, 1952-1957 continues this project by republishing the CIW Current Reports series. The final CIW field project took place in July of 1950, in the Maya region of Mayapán, where extensive and detailed investigations were conducted for five years. To ensure the rapid dissemination of the results of the Mayapán Project, two series of papers described the work being undertaken and reported the preliminary findings. These were volumes 50 through 57 of the Year Books and numbers 1 through 41 of the Current Reports. A total of forty one Current Reports were published by the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1952 to 1957. All of these are reproduced in The Carnegie Maya II, accompanied by an introduction by John Weeks, a forward by Marilyn Masson, and a summary table of data compiled by Marilyn Masson regarding artifacts unearthed at Mayapán.

Published by: University Press of Colorado

Title Page, Copyright

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Figures

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pp. vii-xii

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Foreword

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pp. xiii-xviii

Mayap

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Introduction

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pp. xix-xxiv

Between 1914 and 1958 the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) sponsored extensive archaeological, ethnographic, linguistic, historical, and other related investigations in the Maya region of southern Mexico and northern Central America. During these four decades, the CIW was the leader in the ...

Table 1. Contents of CIW Current Reports, vol. 1 (nos. 15-41), 1952-57.

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p. xxv-xxv

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Preface

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pp. 1-2

The purpose of the present series is to make available as promptly as possible the results of work in progress. The advantages of prompt reporting seem almost too obvious to need comment. A fact sometimes forgotten, however, is that, aside from the information provided to others than our own staff, ...

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1. Map of the Ruins of Mayap

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pp. 3-8

Carnegie Institution of Washington is deeply indebted to the United States Geological Survey for its fine cooperation in the work described below. Not only were the services of Mr. Jones made available for a considerable period of time in two successive seasons, but all necessary surveying ...

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2. The Great Wall of Mayap

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pp. 9-24

There are numerous references in the Maya chronicles and early Spanish colonial historical accounts of Yucat

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3. Residential Property Walls at Mayap

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pp. 25-30

The initial surveys of Mayap

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4. Excavations in House Mounds at Mayap

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pp. 31-42

The dwelling-type structures at Mayapán follow closely Landa’s description of native houses in Yucatán in the sixteenth century. A large number of these structures are shown on the map of Mayapán (Jones 1952). Essentially they consist of a front and a back room but with considerable variation in detail ...

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5. Cenote X-Coton at Mayap

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pp. 43-52

The cenotes of Yucat

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6. Chacchob, Yucat

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pp. 53-64

The ruins of Chacchob are in the District of Tekax, some 13 km by road and 10 or 11 km airline southeast of the town of Teabo. The site was first brought to the attention of the public over 100 years ago in an anonymous article, signed in Curioso, that appeared in a Merida periodical of the time (Anonymous ...

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7. Archaeological Reconnaissance in Tabasco

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pp. 65-84

Tabasco lies in southeast Mexico on the Gulf of Campeche. It consists mainly of an alluvial plain through which the Usumacinta and Grijalva rivers and their tributaries slowly meander. Only at the southern edge of the state does the plain merge into the northern Chiapas mountain chain. As Tabasco ...

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8. A Portal Vault and Temple at Mayap

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pp. 85-90

Str. Q-127 lies at the western edge (265 S, 110 W) of a small assemblage of ceremonial structures that appears to be distinct from the Main Group, some 70 m to the west (Jones 1952, map). A fair likeness of the ground plan is recorded on the map of Mayap

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9. Some Small Ceremonial Structures of Mayap

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pp. 91-110

Although the Main Group is chiefly distinguished by the imposing and easily identifiable ruins of the more important temples and colonnaded halls, there is a considerable number of less impressive structures which also played a part in the activities at Mayap

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10. Excavations in House Mounds at Mayap

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pp. 111-124

During the 1952 season we excavated in house mounds where depressions in benches or any visible constructions below bench level, such as exposed capstones or bared vault or walls, were noted. These constructions had one, two, or three benches (Ruppert and Smith 1952). ...

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11. The X-Coton Temples at Mayap

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pp. 125-134

An examination in 1952 of the Mayap

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12. Cenote Exploration at Mayap

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pp. 135-142

In Europe prehistoric archaeology has largely been established on the results of exploration in caves. More recently archaeological data have been obtained from cave investigation in the United States. As might be expected, therefore, the cenotes of Yucat

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13. Boundary Walls and House Lots at Mayap

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pp. 143-156

During the field season of 1952, preliminary studies were made of the rough stone walls found in great numbers through-out the ruins of Mayap

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14. Three Temples and Their Associated Structures at Mayap

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pp. 157-178

The following report describes the investigations, during the 1953 field season, of several ancient structures within the central group of religious and civic buildings at Mayap

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15. The Northern Terminus of the Principal Sacbe at Mayap

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pp. 179-186

The principal sacbe, or causeway, at Mayap

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16. A Round Temple at Mayap

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pp. 187-192

Since the exhaustive study of round structures in aboriginal Mesoamerica by Pollock (1936), a number of these specialized units have been discovered and a few of them excavated. The round form in prehistoric architecture occurs sporadically throughout Mesoamerica; its use ranges from pre-Classic times ...

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17. Excavations in House Mounds at Mayap

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pp. 193-206

Excavations in the 1954 season were confined to a relatively thorough examination of Group A-3 and Str. Q-62 and to spot digging in nine other structures. The spot digging was done at likely places for encountering tombs and cists noted during the survey and surface examination of the areas. ...

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18. Exploration on the Outskirts of Mayap

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pp. 207-216

The excavation of a small site near a large one, such as Mayap

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19. A Presumed Residence of the Nobility at Mayap

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pp. 217-226

Str. Q-208, situated some 80 m south of the apparent southern edge of the ceremonial center at Mayap

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20. The Temple of Kukulcan at Mayap

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pp. 227-238

Even a casual inspection of the ruins of Mayapán would enable one to state that the temple of Kukulcan (Str. Q-162), popularly known as the Castillo, was the most important architectural unit of the site. Situated on the northwest edge of Cenote Ch’en Mul, it occupies the central position in a tight ...

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21. Excavations in Three Ceremonial Structures at Mayap

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pp. 239-248

During the 1953 field season a program of intensive excavation was begun in selected ceremonial structures in the Main Group at Mayap

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22. Colonnaded Buildings at Mayap

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pp. 249-270

The work of Carnegie Institution in the prehistoric political capital of Mayap

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23. Exploration in Quintana Roo

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pp. 271-176

The explorations described below were carried on by Str

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24. An Archaeological Reconnaissance of Northern Quintana Roo

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pp. 277-306

One of the most important regions of the peninsula of Yucat

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25. A Noble’s Residence and Its Dependencies at Mayapán

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pp. 307-320

The group comprises Str. Q-169 to Q-173a, inclusive. Str. Q-169 (260 S, 385 W), as judged from its size, its superior masonry, and its position less than 100 m from the Temple of Kukulcan, was almost certainly the residence of a chief or priest of outstanding importance; the other buildings in the group ...

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26. Early Ceramic Horizons at Mayap

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pp. 321-328

In order to give some idea of the early ceramic material at Mayap

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27. Another Round Temple at Mayap

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pp. 329-336

The round temple investigated in 1954 at Mayap

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28. An Altar and Platform at Mayap

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pp. 337-342

The ceremonial group at Itzmal Ch’en in the northeast part of Mayapán (365 N, 1520 E), being a fairly small and compact center over 1.5 km from the Main Group, was thought worthy of survey in order to determine, if possible, the minimum number and class of buildings required for such a center. The ...

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29. A Residential Quadrangle: Structures R-85 to R-90

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pp. 343-386

The quadrangle to be described is situated just short of 300 m on the magnetic east line from the main pyramid of Mayap

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30. A Vaulted Temple at Mayap

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pp. 387-396

During the 1953 field season, test excavations by Pollock had indicated the presence of murals in a buried room in Str. Q-80 (150 S, 260 W). Consequently, it was decided the following year to undertake excavation for the purpose of exposing the murals and gaining information on architectural details of the ...

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31. Excavation of a Colonnaded Hall at Mayap

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pp. 397-406

In 1954, while an approach trench was being carried across the colonnaded hall Str. Q-81 (165 S, 260 W) toward the vaulted temple Str. Q-80 on the north side of the north court of the Castillo, the central shrine of the hall was encountered. Excavation of the shrine produced a very interesting group of effigy ...

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32. Three Serpent Column Temples and Associated Platforms at Mayap

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pp. 407-422

The temples and platforms discussed in the following report were excavated during the 1954 field season. The primary objective in the excavation of the temples was the gathering of comparative data on serpent column temples at Mayap

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33. A Dwelling and Shrine at Mayap

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pp. 423-432

Strs. Q-165 to 168 are situated in the Main Group, southwest of the Castillo (280 S, 350 W). The two principal structures are Q-165 and Q-168 (Fig. 33.1). The former, described in a following section of this report, is immediately adjacent to a colonnaded hall on the east. To the west, Strs. Q-166 to 168 stand on ...

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34. A Round Temple and Its Shrine at Mayap

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pp. 433-444

During the 1955 season at Mayapán, the small ceremonial group in Square H, next to Cenote Itzmal Ch’en, was partially excavated and mapped. The original purpose was to remove enough of the over-burden so that the plans of the buildings would be evident, but preliminary excavation of one of the ...

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35. Exploration of the Cave of Dzab-na, Tecoh, Yucat

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pp. 445-450

Late in 1954, while I was exploring the environs of Mayapán and Telchaquillo for pre-Spanish occupation sites, Felix Pat, the comisario municipal of Telchaquillo, told me about cenotes near the town of Tecoh, the municipal seat. Pat’s description of these water sources, and an interesting legend associated ...

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36. Excavations in House Mounds at Mayap

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pp. 451-480

During the 1955 field season, the last season of work by Carnegie Institution at Mayap

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37. The Southern Terminus of the Principal Sacbe at Mayap

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pp. 481-492

The principal sacbe at Mayap

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38. Skeletal Remains from Mayap

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pp. 493-506

The field work on which this report is based was carried on from July 4 to July 12, 1955, at the Depart­ment’s camp in Telchaquillo, Yucatán. A survey was made of all skeletal remains preserved from the past five seasons of digging, with primary attention to evi­dences of pathology, anomalies, and deformations. ...

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39. House Types in the Environs of Mayap

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pp. 507-520

During the 1955 field season the area around Maya

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40. Deities Portrayed on Censers at Mayap

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pp. 521-538

An excellent description of the effigy incense burners of Mayapán has been published by R. M. Adams, Jr. (1953:146–168), and supplementary information by H. D. Winters (1955:385–388). Accordingly, it is sufficient here to give an outline of their material and to refer readers to those sources. Full technical ...

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41. Notes on Vertebrate Animal Remains from Mayap

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pp. 539-550

The collections of animal bones discussed in this paper come from four seasons (1952–1955) or archaeo­logical excavations at the ancient Maya city of Maya­pán in Yucatán, Mexico. Short accounts of this work have appeared in Carnegie Institution Year Books nos. 51–54 (1952–1955), under the sections dealing ...

Editor’s Note

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pp. 551-552

Appendix

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pp. 553-610

Glossary

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pp. 611-612

References

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pp. 613-618

Index

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pp. 619-625


E-ISBN-13: 9780870819957
E-ISBN-10: 087081995X
Print-ISBN-13: 9781607320593
Print-ISBN-10: 0870819585

Page Count: 592
Illustrations: 110 b&w photos, 99 b&w line illustrations, 4 maps
Publication Year: 2011

Research Areas

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Subject Headings

  • Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dept. of Archaeology -- History.
  • Archaeological expeditions -- Central America -- History -- 20th century.
  • Mayas -- Central America -- Antiquities.
  • Central America -- Antiquities.
  • Mexico -- Antiquities.
  • Mayas -- Mexico -- Antiquities.
  • Ethnological expeditions -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century.
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