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All Aboard for Santa Fe

Railway Promotion of the Southwest, 1890s to 1930s

Victoria E. Dye

Publication Year: 2006

All Aboard for Santa Fe is a comprehensive study of AT&SF's early involvement in the establishment of western tourism and the mystique of Santa Fe.

Published by: University of New Mexico Press

Front Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright

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List of Illustrations

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pp. viii-

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-

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Introduction

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pp. 1-4

By the late 1800s the main mode of transportation for travelers to the Southwest was by railroad. In 1878, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company (AT&SF) became the first railroad to enter New Mexico, and by the late 1890s it controlled over half of all of the trackmiles in the Territory.1 ...

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1: History of Santa Fe and the Santa Fe Railway System

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pp. 5-14

North America’s first capital city, Santa Fe, has enticed travelers for generations with its Pueblo-style architecture and deep-rooted heritage. Visitors have traveled to Santa Fe for hundreds of years to trade, visit, or live amid the enchanting landscape. Over the last century the city has become synonymous with Southwestern culture, arts and crafts, cuisine, and architecture. ...

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2: How the AT&SF Marketed Santa Fe into the Early 1920s

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pp. 15-31

Funding the Santa Fe Railway’s massive expansion through the Southwest required increased revenue. To generate ticket sales,the railroad used a variety of approaches to promote the majesty of competitive marketing, in which the railroad promoted the health benefits of the region as well as real estate and land opportunities. ...

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3: The Promotion of Santa Fe by the Harvey Company and the AT&SF into the 1930s

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pp. 33-62

Born in London in 1835 to a Scottish-English couple, Fredrick Henry Harvey became famous for his restaurants and hotels and as the most influential partner of the Santa Fe Railway in promoting the city of Santa Fe.1 At the age of fifteen, Harvey left England bound for New York with ten dollars in his pocket. ...

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4: Promoting Santa Fe the AT&SF Way—Then and Now

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pp. 63-77

In the 1930s, the AT&SF continued advertising Indian Detours and La Fonda, but the railroad also started to branch out to promote other attractions and events.1 While continuing to publicize historical sites, the AT&SF began sponsoring cultural events. To attract people to the old capital, the AT&SF helped to revive and to promote an important celebration called the “Santa Fe Fiesta.” ...

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5: The Town Down The Tracks: Santa Fe's Rival—Albuquerque

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pp. 79-96

W hen the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe first made its way through the northern half of New Mexico, surveyors had determined to bypass Santa Fe because of its location on a high plateau at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The railroad decided the best route for its track would be down the Galisteo Basin to the Rio Grande Valley, leaving Santa Fe on a spur eighteen miles to the north and put-...

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6: The AT&SF's Lingering Effects on Tourism in Modern Day Santa Fe

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pp. 97-100

The AT&SF promoted the many facets that define Santa Fe as a tourist’s destination. The railroad highlighted one such feature, the cultures of the Santa Fe area, in a variety of ways to encourage and promote passenger travel to Santa Fe. Since the coming of the railway, the cultures of the Santa Fe area have been “on display” for numerous curious visitors. ...

Appendix A: Brochures by the AT&SF and The Fred Harvey Company

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pp. 101-105

Appendix B: Santa Fe Hotel Listings, 1880 to 1940

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pp. 107-109

Appendix C: Santa Fe Curio Shop Listings, 1900 to 1940

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pp. 111-113

Appendix D: Population, Albuquerque and Santa Fe

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pp. 115-

Appendix E: Albuquerque Curio Listings

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pp. 117-119

Appendix F: Albuquerque Hotel Listings

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pp. 121-124

Appendix G: Tourism Statistics (Lodgers' Tax Reports)

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pp. 125-126

Notes

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pp. 127-146

Bibliography

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pp. 147-156

Index

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pp. 157-163

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9780826336590
E-ISBN-10: 0826336590
Print-ISBN-13: 9780826336583
Print-ISBN-10: 0826336582

Page Count: 175
Illustrations: 31 halftones, 1 map
Publication Year: 2006