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Prehistoric America

Written by Marquis de Nadaillac, translated by N. D'Advers, edited by W.H.Dall a

Publication Year: 2005

A classic volume on the early study of American Indians.

With the settling of the New World, word spread throughout Europe of the native inhabitants, their artifacts, communities, and culturals. Prehistoric America by Marquis de Nadaillac is a prime example of a classic work of the period that addressed the antiquity of humans in the New World, drawing upon the full range of scientific data compiled on the inhabitants and their cultures. The proximity of human remains with those of extinct animals was still a very recent finding, even in the Old World. Nadaillac’s early attempts at cross-cultural comparison and theoretical explanations make this work valid despite the advances of modern-day scholarship. This work was originally published in French in 1883 and translated into English in 1884.
 

 

Published by: The University of Alabama Press

Contents

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pp. v-

Note by the Editor (1885)

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pp. vii-

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

Pre-historic man has for some time excited a justifiable interest not only among men of science but among men of intelligence everywhere. The first revelations in regard to the co-existence of man with extinct animals were received not only with surprise but with natural incredulity. Soon, however, proofs of such ...

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Introduction to the 2005 Edition

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pp. xiii-xxviii

Why reprint Nadaillac's Pre-Historic America? To be sure, it is not a source that immediately pops to mind in looking at nineteenth-century scholarship, as do Morgan's Ancient Society and Tylor's Primitive Culture. Nevertheless, it is an important work, and one that saw numerous reprinting after ...

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Chapter 1. MAN AND THE MASTODON.

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pp. 1-45

The existence of the American continent was unknown to the Egyptians and the Phrenicians, as well as to the Greeks and Romans. We find nothing in the writings either of historians or of geographers to justify the assertion that the ancients even suspected ...

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Chapter 2. THE KITCHEN-MIDDENS AND THE CAVES.

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pp. 46-79

At the close of the last chapter we said that other men with different manners and tastes, perhaps also of different origin, replaced the first inhabitants of America. A considerable change took place, and we have not now to deal with nomad savages, wandering without shelter in the ...

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Chapter 3. THE MOUND BUILDERS.

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pp. 80-132

The existence of artificial mounds in the valleys of the Mississippi, the Ohio, and the Missouri, with those formed by their tributaries, escaped the notice of the first pioneers in America, who were altogether absorbed with the search ...

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Chapter 4. POTTERY, WEAPONS, AND ORNAMENTS OF THE MOUND BUILDERS.

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pp. 133-197

The humblest forms of ceramic art were among the first inventions of the human race. Dishes of some sort are indispensable for holding the food of man, and no matter how remote the age to which we look back, we find them among ...

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Chapter 5. THE CLIFF DWELLERS AND THE INHABITANTS OF THE PUEBLOS.

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pp. 198-259

The nineteenth century, now approaching its decline, has played a grand role in the history of humanity, and never have such great things been accomplished with such marvellous rapidity. We justly count amongst those who have ...

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Chapter 6. THE PEOPLE OF CENTRAL AMERICA.

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pp. 260-316

America does not stint her surprises for those who study her ancient history. We have spoken of the mounds, so strange alike in form and construction, the dwellings, true eagle's nests, formed amid perpendicular cliffs, the pueblos, where a considerable population lived in common. We shall ...

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Chapter 7. THE RUINS OF CENTRAL AMERICA.

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pp. 317-386

In a previous chapter we gave a summary of the best available information about the races who occupied Central America, pushed southward, founding confederacies, building towns, and covering whole regions with their structures, to disappear, leaving hardly a name in history, or a ...

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Chapter 8. PERU.

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pp. 387-475

The chain of the Andes traverses the whole of South America, and near the boundary between Bolivia and Chili it divides into two branches,

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Chapter 9. TIlE MEN OF AMERICA.

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pp. 476-517

In the preceding chapters is related all that it is at present possible to state definitely about the times which preceded the Spanish invasion in America. We have seen the first inhabitants of the New World passing successively through the phases of a civilization analogous to that of our ...

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Chapter 10. THE ORIGIN OF MAN IN AMERICA.

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pp. 518-532

In the preceding pages1 we have reviewed the existing knowledge of ancient man in America. His temples, fortresses, dwellings, monuments, agricultural and hydraulic works, his personal characteristics, and even the relics of his dinners have been described in detail. This task being ...

Appendix

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pp. 533-537

Index

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pp. 539-566


E-ISBN-13: 9780817384166
Print-ISBN-13: 9780817352721

Page Count: 594
Publication Year: 2005