We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Archaeological Researches at Teotihuacan, Mexico

Written by Sigvald Linne, foreword by Staffan Brunius and introduction by George

Publication Year: 2003

The field data and archaeological analysis of the first controlled excavations of the vast "City of the Gods" in central Mexico.

In 1932, the Ethnographical Museum of Sweden sent an archaeological expedition to Mexico under the direction of Sigvald Linné to determine the full extent of this ancient Teotihuacan occupation and to collect exhibit-quality artifacts. Of an estimated 2000-plus residential compounds at Teotihuacan, only 20 apartmentlike structures were excavated at the time. Yet Linné's work revealed residential patterns that have been confirmed later in other locations. Some of the curated objects from the Valley of Mexico and the adjacent state of Puebla are among the most rare and unique artifacts yet found. Another important aspect of this research was that, with the aid of the Museum of Natural History in Washington, Linné's team conducted ethnographic interviews with remnant native Mexican peoples whose culture had not been entirely destroyed by the Conquest, thereby collecting and preserving valuable information for later research.

Sigvald Linné was Professor of Ethnography at the University of Stockholm and Director of the Swedish National Museum of Ethnography until 1969. He published several other books, including The Technique of South American Ceramics. Staffan Brunius is Curator of the Americas at the National Museum of Ethnography in Stockholm. George L. Cowgillis Professor of Anthropology at Arizona State University and coeditor of The Collapse of Ancient States and Civilizations.

Published by: The University of Alabama Press

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF (39.8 KB)
 

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF (18.6 KB)
pp. v-

read more

FOREWORD The Early Swedish Americanist Tradition and the Contributions of Sigvald Linne (1899-1986)

pdf iconDownload PDF (447.9 KB)
pp. 8-13

In the 1920s the university and the ethnographical museum of Gothenburg (Goteborg), the busy seaport city, were the institutions to attend for an academically competent and internationally well respected Swedish education in American Indian cultures. This high quality ethnographical-anthropological training was the result of one man's extraordinary achievements-those of baron Erland Nordenskiold (1877-1932), the prominent......

read more

INTRODUCTION TO THE 2003 EDITION

pdf iconDownload PDF (742.9 KB)
pp. xiii-xxi

Between 26 April and 29 July of 1932, Swedish anthropologist/archaeologist Sigvald Linne, accompanied by his wife and with the aid of a crew varying from four to nine, excavated in the house lot called Xolalpan, within the village of San Francisco Mazapan, part of the municipality of San Juan Teotihuacan, finding remains of the ancient Teotihuacan* civilization, as well as later materials above the floors of the Teotihuacan structure. He also worked briefly at the site called "Las Palmas," about 150 to 200 meters...

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (115.3 KB)
pp. 5-8

read more

PREFACE

pdf iconDownload PDF (201.2 KB)
pp. 9-11

Of the journey of archaeological study and research, the more important results of which are dealt with in the following, the initiative was taken by Sweden's envoy to Mexico, Minister C. G. G. Anderberg. By the Royal Swedish Academy of Science I was granted, for the purpose of carrying out this expedition, leave of absence for eight months, as from January 15th, 1932. Minister Anderberg also succeeded...

read more

INTRODUCTORY NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF (107.4 KB)
pp. 12-13

To South American ethnography and archaeology interest has in the last decades been devoted by not a few Swedish explorers, the foremost of whom was Professor Baron Erland Nordenskiold. By him was at the Gothenburg Museum created its ethnographical department, which, in regard to South America, is counted among the most important in the world. Through the work of Nordenskiold, and that of his pupils and other Swedes, Sweden has come to occupy a prominent...

read more

PART I EXCURSIONS INTO MEXICAN ANTIQUITY

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 14-33

W e do not with certainty know when, where, or how the first discoverers of America reached the New World. If we could answer the question why that continent first became the object of emigration, these problems would be easier of solution. It appears strange that the inhospitable - and nowadays sparsely populated - regions of northeastern Asia, which after the last glacial period cannot be supposed to have afforded particularly favourable natural conditions to...

read more

Part II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATION WORK AT TEOTIHUACAN IN 1932

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.0 MB)
pp. 36-49

Xter having travelled for purposes of study through, among other places, Yucatan, visited various spots of archaeological interest in the Valley of Mexico and adjacent districts, and finally conferred with different archaeologists, I came to the conclusion that Teotihuacan was likely to offer the best chances of successful field work. Dr. George C. Vaillant, who during the winter months had been carrying out...

read more

PART III THE FINDS

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.0 MB)
pp. 50-74

The inventory, or list, which was compiled in the cataloguing and sorting of the collections at Teotihuacan comprised 6783 numbers. The parts of the collections that were added during the last weeks of the excavation operations were somewhat summarily catalogued, and occasionally several minor objects were then grouped under one and the same...

read more

PART IV ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDS OF THE MAZAPAN CULTURE

pdf iconDownload PDF (930.0 KB)
pp. 75-86

I n the foregoing it has already been mentioned that Vaillant at Las Palmas discovered remains of a culture that previously had escaped attention, and that the considered himself justified in dating it between the Aztec and Teotihuacan cultures.1 There has also been given a brief account of the work carried out by us at this place. At Xolalpan we acquired a considerable quantity of material belonging...

read more

PART V FINDS OF THE AZTEC CULTURE

pdf iconDownload PDF (89.7 KB)
pp. 87-

The Aztec empire was a young organization, which had not long been established by an exceedingly expansive and warlike race. When the Spaniards arrived in 1519 the Aztec sphere of dominion extended across the modern republic of Mexico from sea to sea. Certain districts, however, retained their independence...

read more

PART VI MISCELLANEOUS POTTERY FINDS FROM VARIOUS SITES AND OF VARIOUS CULTURES

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.2 MB)
pp. 89-129

For practical reasons the detached finds have been collocated in groups according to the class of the objects, and not divided up according to the respective archaeological sites. Whenever possible, in each of these sections mention has been made as to the culture, or cultures, to which the different objects belong. Some of them are restricted to a single epoch, while others occur from the earliest periods...

read more

PART VII STONE OBJECTS

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.4 MB)
pp. 130-161

Numerically, objects of stone form a considerable part of the collections. The more important of them have been grouped together according to the purpose for which they were used. On account of the total absence of metals most implements were made of stone, the tool equipage being supplemented with others made of bone, burnt clay...

PA R T VIII APPENDICES

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.9 MB)
pp. 162-214

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF (492.0 KB)
pp. 215-220

Works Consulted

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.0 MB)
pp. 221-233

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (361.2 KB)
pp. 234-236


E-ISBN-13: 9780817383794
Print-ISBN-13: 9780817350055

Page Count: 258
Publication Year: 2003