We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

The Road to Botany Bay

An Exploration of Landscape and History

Paul Carter

Publication Year: 2010

The Road to Botany Bay, first published in 1987 and considered a classic in the field of cultural and historical geography, examines the poetic constitution of colonial society. Through a far-reaching exploration of Australia’s mapping, narrative description, early urbanism, and bush mythology, Paul Carter exposes the mythopoetic mechanisms of empire. A powerfully written account of the ways in which language, history, and geography influenced the territorial theater of nineteenth-century imperialism, the book is also a call to think, write, and live differently.

Published by: University of Minnesota Press

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF (136.9 KB)
pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (83.8 KB)
pp. vii-9

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF (112.5 KB)
pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgements

pdf iconDownload PDF (111.6 KB)
pp. xi-xii

In 1983-4 the Literature Board of the Australia Council awarded me a three month living and travelling grant: at a time when the book's development was both financially and conceptually uncertain, this meant a great deal. I am also grateful to the former editor...

read more

Introduction: A Cake of Portable Soup

pdf iconDownload PDF (660.5 KB)
pp. xiii-29

No sign of life on the shore this morning. From the bridge the glass picks out nothing. No wordless mime of figures crouched on their haunches; no Indians, more unaccountably still, pursue their way ... in all appearance intirely unmov'd by the neighbourhood of so remarkable...

read more

1 An Outline of Names

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.6 MB)
pp. 1-33

Casting a jaundiced eye over burgeoning preparations for Australia's bi-centenary, a weekend columnist of the Melbourne newspaper The Age reported not so long ago a plan to replace all Cook's Australian place names with others more congenial to ordinary Australians. It is a measure of Cook's ambiguous role in Australian history that one...

read more

2 An Airy Barrier

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 34-68

Almost the greatest barrier to Australia's spatial history is the date 1788. On the one side, anterior to and beyond the limits of Australian 'history', lies a hazy geo-historical tradition of surmise, a blank sea scored at intervals down the centuries by the prows of dug-outs...

read more

3 The Charm of Novelty

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.5 MB)
pp. 69-98

The ambition to relate unrelated things, to bring distant things close, is, quite literally, the scope of Cook's or Mitchell's names; and it defines equally well the purpose of their journals as a •whole. Explorers who wrote up their journeys aimed to bring the country before their readers' eyes. The logic they used to discover the country did...

read more

4 Triangles of Life

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 99-135

The ambition to relate unrelated things, to bring distant things close, is, quite literally, the scope of Cook's or Mitchell's names; and it defines equally well the purpose of their journals as a •whole. Explorers who wrote up their journeys aimed to bring the country before their readers' eyes. The logic they used to discover the country did...

read more

5 Debatable Land

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 136-171

East of Melbourne and north of Westernport Bay, there is an area that early maps showing aboriginal tribal divisions describe as 'Debatable Land'. It was land that no one laid claim to, or it was land whose ownership was disputed. Either way, it "was land that had not been settled. Whether the Aborigines saw it in this light is extremely...

read more

6 A Thorny Passage

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.4 MB)
pp. 172-201

Going and coming back are by no means the same thing. The mileage may be the same and, to judge from the map, the route identical. But, to the traveller on the road, the difference is obvious. Retracing his steps, he now faces the country which, on the outward journey, was always behind him. Instead of spreading out, it converges. In this sense, he once again enters a new country. But...

read more

7 Elysiums for Gentlemen

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.3 MB)
pp. 202-229

One result of Flinders's Spencer Gulf survey was that he became a founding father. A little over thirty years after his passage Edward Wakefield formed in London the South Australian Land Company. Its object was to initiate a grand experiment in the art of colonization and for the formation of a community among which industry would be wholly unfettered...

read more

8 A More Pleasing Prospect

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.4 MB)
pp. 230-260

About the time Cook returned from his Endeavour voyage, a poet or poetaster from my home town wrote a poem called 'Faringdon Hill'. From its modest heights, Henry James Pye, local squire and, later, Poet Laureate, surveyed the 'various objects scatter'd....

read more

9 Intimate Charm

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.4 MB)
pp. 261-292

The candle flame, the light at the window, the glow of an inviting interior: these are not only the memorable images of home in European fiction. They were, in nineteenth-century Australia, visions representing familiar spatial experiences. Both the traveller and the settler recognized in them the essence of what they meant by...

read more

10 The Road to Botany Bay

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.3 MB)
pp. 293-319

The place in which a pioneer like Caleb Burchett lived was not there in advance of him. His living space was the offspring of his intent to settle. His ability to interpret symbolically the language of longitude and latitude enabled him by 'looking at the survey map' to select a piece of land. But this limited blankness was still a potential...

read more

11 A Wandering State

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.6 MB)
pp. 320-352

The road to Botany Bay leads back not only to the world of the convicts but also to Australia's earlier inhabitants, the Aborigines. It does this quite literally in the sense that, if the escaping convicts did take a 'road' of any description, it must have been an aboriginal track. Botany Bay was apparently an aboriginal meeting place...

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF (4.0 MB)
pp. 382-413

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF (817.9 KB)
pp. 353-376

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (611.2 KB)
pp. 377-445

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF (26.6 KB)
p. 446-446

He is an interdisciplinary scholar in the Faculty of Architecture,as creative director of Material Thinking, a research and design...


E-ISBN-13: 9780816673759
E-ISBN-10: 0816673756
Print-ISBN-13: 9780816669974

Page Count: 416
Publication Year: 2010