We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Chicana and Chicano Mental Health

Alma, Mente y Corazón

Yvette G. Flores

Publication Year: 2013

Spirit, mind, and heart—in traditional Mexican health beliefs all three are inherent to maintaining psychological balance. For Mexican Americans, who are both the oldest Latina/o group in the United States as well as some of the most recent arrivals, perceptions of health and illness often reflect a dual belief system that has not always been incorporated in mental health treatments.
Chicana and Chicano Mental Health offers a model to understand and to address the mental health challenges and service disparities affecting Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans/Chicanos. Yvette G. Flores, who has more than thirty years of experience as a clinical psychologist, provides in-depth analysis of the major mental health challenges facing these groups: depression; anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder; substance abuse; and intimate partner violence. Using a life-cycle perspective that incorporates indigenous health beliefs, Flores examines the mental health issues affecting children and adolescents, adult men and women, and elderly Mexican Americans.
Through case studies, Flores examines the importance of understanding cultural values, class position, and the gender and sexual roles and expectations Chicanas/os negotiate, as well as the legacies of migration, transculturation, and multiculturality. Chicana and Chicano Mental Health is the first book of its kind to embrace both Western and Indigenous perspectives.
Ideally suited for students in psychology, social welfare, ethnic studies, and sociology, the book also provides valuable information for mental health professionals who desire a deeper understanding of the needs and strengths of the largest ethnic minority and Hispanic population group in the United States.
Spirit, mind, and heart—in traditional Mexican health beliefs all three are inherent to maintaining psychological balance. For Mexican Americans, who are both the oldest Latina/o group in the United States as well as some of the most recent arrivals, perceptions of health and illness often reflect a dual belief system that has not always been incorporated in mental health treatments.
Chicana and Chicano Mental Health offers a model to understand and to address the mental health challenges and service disparities affecting Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans/Chicanos. Yvette G. Flores, who has more than thirty years of experience as a clinical psychologist, provides in-depth analysis of the major mental health challenges facing these groups: depression; anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder; substance abuse; and intimate partner violence. Using a life-cycle perspective that incorporates indigenous health beliefs, Flores examines the mental health issues affecting children and adolescents, adult men and women, and elderly Mexican Americans.
Through case studies, Flores examines the importance of understanding cultural values, class position, and the gender and sexual roles and expectations Chicanas/os negotiate, as well as the legacies of migration, transculturation, and multiculturality. Chicana and Chicano Mental Health is the first book of its kind to embrace both Western and Indigenous perspectives.
Ideally suited for students in psychology, social welfare, ethnic studies, and sociology, the book also provides valuable information for mental health professionals who desire a deeper understanding of the needs and strengths of the largest ethnic minority and Hispanic population group in the United States.

Published by: University of Arizona Press

Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (64.8 KB)
p. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF (187.2 KB)
pp. 2-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (73.8 KB)
pp. vii-9

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (78.3 KB)
pp. ix-x

This book could not have been written without the support and encouragement of Adela de la Torre and my colleagues in the Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies at UC Davis, my academic home for the past twenty-three years. My appreciation to Angie Chabram, Miroslava...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (130.4 KB)
pp. 1-14

According to Mexican traditional healers, or curandera/os, health is a state of balance between body and mind, mind and heart, and body, mind, and spirit; moreover, “the health of the soul and spirit [is] at the basis of many physical and emotional ailments” (Avila and Parker...

read more

1. The Mental Health of Chicana and Chicano Children

pdf iconDownload PDF (144.5 KB)
pp. 15-32

Nearly one-fourth of all children in the United States who are younger than eighteen years are Latino. In 2009, 18 percent of the estimated Latino population was younger than five years old (US Census Bureau 2011), and the majority of these children were Chicana/o or Mexican American...

read more

2. Adolescent Mental Health

pdf iconDownload PDF (138.8 KB)
pp. 33-51

The most prevalent mental health problems affecting Chicano/a youth include depression, anxiety, and conduct disorders. Young Chicano males have a high risk of accidental death, as well as death by suicide or homicide (Aguirre-Molina and Betancourt 2010). Chicanas have higher rates...

read more

3. Gender and Mental Health: Depression, Anxiety, and Substance Abuse among Chicanas

pdf iconDownload PDF (160.4 KB)
pp. 52-75

In the general population, the primary mental health diagnoses affecting women are major depression and anxiety disorders—in particular posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of gender and sexual violence (Alegria et al. 2007; Herman 1992) and intergenerational trauma. Women are likely to experience depression...

read more

4. Los Hombres: The Negotiation of Grief and Pain

pdf iconDownload PDF (160.4 KB)
pp. 76-99

As early as childhood, Chicanos may experience microaggressions and “daily indignities” (Franklin and Boyd-Franklin 2000; Sue 2010) that can attack the body, mind, and heart. Chicano boys often are problematized in the community, school, and even in the home as disobedient, willful, conduct...

read more

5. Sexualities

pdf iconDownload PDF (149.0 KB)
pp. 100-121

Sexuality encompasses an individual’s sex, gender identity and expression, and sexual orientation (American Psychological Association 2010). How a person comes of age sexually in terms of these factors is greatly influenced by his or her cultural upbringing. As discussed in earlier chapters, Latino men and women often receive...

read more

6. Mental Health and Aging: Finding Balance en la Tercera Edad

pdf iconDownload PDF (129.1 KB)
pp. 122-136

The degree of physical and mental health experienced by individuals in their “golden years”—defined in the United States as the age of retirement and in Latin America as “the third age”—is determined in large measure by the quality of life attained since childhood. Individuals who face health disparities are believed...

read more

Conclusion: Chicana/o Mental Health in the Twenty-first Century

pdf iconDownload PDF (91.2 KB)
pp. 137-141

The growth of the Chicano population over the past two decades and the entry of Latino professionals into positions of authority in the fields of health, mental health, education, and policy have increased the interest in understanding and promoting the well-being of Mexican-origin people. The chapters...

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF (145.3 KB)
pp. 143-163

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (73.4 KB)
pp. 165-167

About the Author, Further Reading

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.9 KB)
pp. 169-170


E-ISBN-13: 9780816599950
E-ISBN-10: 0816599955
Print-ISBN-13: 9780816529742
Print-ISBN-10: 0816529744

Page Count: 182
Publication Year: 2013

Series Title: The Mexican American Experience
Series Editor Byline: John Smith, Will Wordsworth