We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Poets Translate Poets

A Hudson Review Anthology

edited by Paula Deitz

Publication Year: 2013

In reviewing the Hudson Review’s history of publishing poetry in translation since 1948, the editors have compiled a collection that highlights the work of major American and English poets, most of whom are prominent in their own right, who, for the last half-century, have made accessible through their translations the work of their international colleagues. “Poets Translate Poets” contains translations of classical Latin and Greek poetry, classical Chinese and medieval East Asian verse, canonical French, German, and Italian writers, twentieth-century Latin American poetry, and a sampling of works from Persian, South Asian, South East Asian, Scandinavian, and Eastern European poets.

Published by: Syracuse University Press

Cover, Inside Flap

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.0 MB)
pp. 1-2

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF (80.7 KB)
pp. 3-8

read more

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (92.8 KB)
pp. vii-xviii

Tuni1EEA.sc KEcircumflex.scacute.cap Tuni01B0.scuni1EDC.scng 414...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF (84.8 KB)
pp. xix-xxii

While the name of the Hudson Review denotes the magazine?s local ori-gins in a makeshift of_f_i ce in lower Manhattan a block from the Hud-son River, like the city in which it was founded in 1948, its outlook from the beginning has been international. Frederick Morgan, a founding editor who had majored in romance languages and literatures at Princeton University, reminisced in a 1997 interview about a conversation he had early on with ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (143.2 KB)
pp. xxiii-xxxix

Since 1948, when it was founded, the Hudson Review has published nearly fi ve hundred poems in translation from more than thirty languages. Two of the magazine?s founders, Frederick Morgan and William Arrowsmith, have themselves made signifi cant contributions as translators from ancient and modern languages. Poetry in translation has been such an important feature of the Hudson Review in part because of the inf_l uence, direct and indirect, ...

Bulgarian

Krassin Himmirsky

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.5 KB)
pp. 3-4

Chinese

Tu Fu

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.6 KB)
pp. 7-10

Old English

Anonymous

pdf iconDownload PDF (90.6 KB)
pp. 13-18

Middle English

read more

Anonymous Fourteenth-Century Poet

pdf iconDownload PDF (138.9 KB)
pp. 21-38

Now as the New Year was drawing nigh, and the night before it passed,But a wild weather was working up in the world outside their doors:Th e clouds emptied their cold contents keenly down on the earth,With cruelty enough from the north to torment the naked f_l esh.Th e whistling wind whipped down upon them shrilly from the heights,...

Old French

Richard I

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.6 KB)
pp. 41-42

Middle French

Christine de Pisan

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.7 KB)
pp. 45-48

French

François Villon

pdf iconDownload PDF (86.5 KB)
pp. 51-56

Joachim du Bellay

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.1 KB)
p. 57-57

Jean-Antoine de Baïf

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.6 KB)
p. 58-58

read more

Jean Passerat

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.3 KB)
p. 59-59

Addressed to Henry III on the death of Th ul?ne, the King?s fool...

Pierre Corneille

pdf iconDownload PDF (124.2 KB)
pp. 60-77

read more

Jean de La Fontaine

pdf iconDownload PDF (78.4 KB)
pp. 78-81

Till the sun?s genial inf_l uence caused the traveller to give way,Except that they were worse. Th e pedant?man in its most worthless ...

Victor Hugo

pdf iconDownload PDF (75.5 KB)
pp. 82-85

Leconte de Lisle

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.3 KB)
p. 86-86

Charles Baudelaire

pdf iconDownload PDF (73.0 KB)
pp. 87-89

Stéphane Mallarmé

pdf iconDownload PDF (80.5 KB)
pp. 90-95

Paul Valéry

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.6 KB)
pp. 96-98

Guillaume Apollinaire

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.8 KB)
p. 99-99

read more

Valery Larbaud

pdf iconDownload PDF (77.0 KB)
pp. 100-103

In a compartment of the North Express between Wirballen and Pskow.And you, great squares across which I have seen Siberia as it passed and the Harsh, unf_l owering Castille, and the sea of Marmara under a warm rain!Ef_f ortlessly preceding four yellow coaches with gold letteringShe let down the bucket of pure water so that it rested on the pavement...

Jean Follain

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.0 KB)
pp. 104-105

read more

Yves Bonnefoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (88.7 KB)
pp. 106-113

Indeed, the place for mastery, for mastering ourselves, is here,Th an lightning, when it stains the white windows of your blood.?Rather the ivy,? you said, ?the clinging of ivy to the stone of its ?Last happy windowpane ripped by the sun?s claws, rather in the Stupor of dresses and cry of rocks?and you passed in front of these f_l ames,...

read more

Philippe Jaccottet

pdf iconDownload PDF (81.1 KB)
pp. 114-120

A childhood memory. Th e one who would take water in his hands . . .All this green stuf_f does not pile up but trembles and shines,...

German

Walther von der Vogelweide

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.5 KB)
pp. 123-124

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

pdf iconDownload PDF (89.2 KB)
pp. 125-131

Christian Morgenstern

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.9 KB)
p. 132-132

Erich Kästner

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.8 KB)
pp. 133-134

Ancient Greek

read more

Homer

pdf iconDownload PDF (104.6 KB)
pp. 137-145

...between Trojans, tamers of horses, and the bronze-clad Achaians,and you shall be the wife of the man who wins in the fi ghting.?and her parents. Over her head she drew a veil of shimmering cloth,and the tears stood in her eyes as she quickly went from her room;like the gentle eyes of cattle. And these three went swift ly down...

read more

Sappho

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.4 KB)
pp. 146-147

...aft er this, nor regret when you are gone. You have not touched the f_l owersyou must drift with a ghost?s f_l uttering wings, one of the darkened dead.Aft er her death the maidens who were her friends, with sharp iron...

read more

Sophocles

pdf iconDownload PDF (211.8 KB)
pp. 148-196

...(Antigone is brought from the Palace through the double doors by guards.)Th e Trachiniae presents the highest peak of Greek sensibility registered in any of the plays that have come down to us, and is, at the same time, A version for KITASONO KATUE, hoping he will use it on my dear old friend Miscio Ito, or take it to the Minoru if they can be persuaded to ...

Greek

Kostis Palamas

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.4 KB)
p. 199-199

read more

C. P. Cavafy

pdf iconDownload PDF (79.0 KB)
pp. 200-204

...by just one of pleasure?s nights, or one of its shimmering mornings.for him, a young man with some education, twenty-fi ve years of age.however cleverly he played, however stupid the partners he chose?And he?d be left completely nude; f_l awlessly beautiful; a thing of wonder.from his nakedness in the morning at the baths, and at the seashore....

read more

Yannis Ritsos

pdf iconDownload PDF (71.0 KB)
pp. 205-206

...does the root of the fi g tree grasp? On what branch of the windsupported on the shoulders of the dead, with the earth on our chests,with their broad hands blunting the clang of the buried churchbell.Th ese rocks he carries on his shoulders he carves into his stools and his they sang toward the sea from their balconies under an enormous moon,...

Hungarian

Attila József

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.5 KB)
pp. 209-210

Italian

Giuseppe Ungaretti

pdf iconDownload PDF (84.1 KB)
pp. 213-219

read more

Lucio Piccolo

pdf iconDownload PDF (82.1 KB)
pp. 220-226

...either mulberry or sorb-apple, woodland fruit that f_l atters with liesthe stilled millstone, hoes long used to the grip of rural hands:that are voiceless . . . sets spinning the girandole of shadows:...

Japanese

read more

Kakinomoto no Hitomaro

pdf iconDownload PDF (74.6 KB)
pp. 229-232

Ode at the Time of the Temporary Interment of Princess Asuka at Kino?O the wind that blew up at the mountain-crossing of our great lord...

read more

Motomaro Senge

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.0 KB)
pp. 233-234

It?s as beautiful as if plucked this instant from an unseen bough....

L atin

read more

Lucretius

pdf iconDownload PDF (108.7 KB)
pp. 237-245

As when the leaders of the Greeks, those peerless peers, defi ledSo that its ends streamed down her cheeks, the girl became awareOf people shedding tears to see her froze her tongue with fright.For the princess now, that she had been the fi rst to give the kingAll this for fair and favorable winds to sail the f_l eet along!?...

Catullus

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.8 KB)
p. 246-246

Horace

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.2 KB)
pp. 247-248

Macedonian

Bogomil Gjuzel

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.5 KB)
pp. 251-252

Persian

Fakhr addin Gorgani

pdf iconDownload PDF (87.6 KB)
pp. 255-260

Polish

read more

Zbigniew Herbert

pdf iconDownload PDF (76.2 KB)
pp. 263-266

...for the fi rst time err in their fi gures to their own disadvantageTh e inquisitors are in our midst. Th ey live in vast subterranean houses and Tables with f_l exed bronze muscles, powerful rollers, crushing slowly but with precision, a driving-wheel, which knows no mercy?are waiting for us.Th e sheets, which they carry out of the wringer-shop, are like empty ...

Portuguese

Pero Meogo

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.7 KB)
p. 269-269

Joan de Guilhade

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.7 KB)
p. 270-270

Nuno Fernandes Torneol

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.1 KB)
p. 271-271

Francisco de Sá de Miranda

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.5 KB)
p. 272-272

Provençal

Guillem Comte de Peitau

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.9 KB)
pp. 275-277

Giraut de Bornelh

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.9 KB)
pp. 278-279

Raimbaut de Vaqueiras

pdf iconDownload PDF (71.1 KB)
pp. 280-282

Peire Vidal

pdf iconDownload PDF (74.9 KB)
pp. 283-284

Quechua

Anonymous Poets

pdf iconDownload PDF (78.8 KB)
pp. 287-294

Romanesco

G. G. Belli

pdf iconDownload PDF (83.3 KB)
pp. 297-302

Russian

read more

Fyodor Tyutchev

pdf iconDownload PDF (71.0 KB)
pp. 305-307

.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

Anna Akhmatova

pdf iconDownload PDF (83.8 KB)
pp. 308-312

read more

Osip Mandelstam

pdf iconDownload PDF (74.8 KB)
pp. 313-316

...the shuttle f_l uttering back and forth, the hum of the spindle,...

Marina Tsvetaeva

pdf iconDownload PDF (132.3 KB)
pp. 317-342

Sergei Essenin

pdf iconDownload PDF (71.9 KB)
pp. 343-345

read more

Olga Sedakova

pdf iconDownload PDF (75.7 KB)
pp. 346-349

...through which, remember, you looked and could never get your fi ll?...

read more

Dimitri V. Psurtsev

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.1 KB)
pp. 350-352

And the terrible cold can?t get under my high Tartar cheekbones;My moustache does get frosted and my blood?s like chilled vodka:But here I am, happy-go-lucky, at home in the last, the Th ird Rome,...

Spanish

Lope de Vega

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.4 KB)
pp. 355-356

Rubén Darío

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.8 KB)
p. 357-357

Antonio Machado

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.6 KB)
pp. 358-359

Gabriela Mistral

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.0 KB)
pp. 360-362

Jorge Guillén

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.1 KB)
pp. 363-364

Vicente Huidobro

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.0 KB)
p. 365-365

read more

Jorge Luis Borges

pdf iconDownload PDF (95.3 KB)
pp. 366-375

Of all the nights and mornings that our yesterday hides in its handComes the snow-white hind that appeared to me this morning in my dream?I shall fi nd you again, oh white hind that for one instant shone.But little more than the dream of a moment of whiteness and of dew.Now it is yours, Abramowicz, the singular taste of death, withheld ...

read more

Eugenio Florit

pdf iconDownload PDF (81.5 KB)
pp. 376-381

...(but real ones, not those made of wood-fi ber and synthetic silk)without knowing whether it is going to be f_l owers or a gorilla....

Pablo Neruda

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.2 KB)
pp. 382-384

Miguel Hernández

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.0 KB)
p. 385-385

Héctor Inchaústegui Cabral

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.4 KB)
pp. 386-387

read more

Octavio Paz

pdf iconDownload PDF (78.1 KB)
pp. 388-393

...1. Ustica is a volcanic desert island in the Sicilian sea. It was a Saracen graveyard....

Juan Matos

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.7 KB)
pp. 394-396

Swedish

read more

Gunnar Ekelöf

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.5 KB)
pp. 399-401

Th ere is a knowledge, unprotected, built on insecure emptiness....

Lars Gustafsson

pdf iconDownload PDF (73.2 KB)
pp. 402-406

Vietnamese

read more

Nguyễn Bįnh Khiêm

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.9 KB)
p. 409-409

N.scguyuni1EC4.scn Buni1EC8.scnh KhiEcircumflex.scm 409 whwytrirightall an immortal can hope for. I should not have to face the world,Th is inconsiderate war. I must dwell on the word ?contentment,?...

Phùng Khắc Khoan

pdf iconDownload PDF (65.8 KB)
p. 410-410

To Huu

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.8 KB)
pp. 411-412

Tru Vu

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.8 KB)
p. 413-413

read more

Từ Kế Tương

pdf iconDownload PDF (70.1 KB)
pp. 414-418

Tuspace_uni031B.sc` Ke?? Tuspace_uni031B.sco`space_uni031B.scng (b. 1946)in the morning you just wake up when that painter suddenly splashesTuni1EEA.sc KEcircumflex.scacute.cap Tuni01B0.scuni1EDC.scng 415 whwytriright...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (77.7 KB)
pp. 419-420

A special note of appreciation to the following authors? representatives for granting permission to publish their works in this anthology:Th e translations of Anna Akhmatova appear with the permission of Mrs. ?La rosa? from Fervor de Buenos Aires and ?Buenos Aires? from El Otro, El Mismo by Jorge Luis Borges. Copyright ? 1996 by Maria Kodama, used by Translation of ?Chanson,? ?Les Amours XIII,? and ?Dedication of a Mir-...

read more

Notes on Poets

pdf iconDownload PDF (144.0 KB)
pp. 421-436

Anna Akhmatova. Considered in the pantheon of renowned Russian poets, along with Osip Mandelstam, Boris Pasternak, and Marina Tsvetaeva, she survived blacklisting by Joseph Stalin, and the imprisonment of her son under his regime, to become through her voice the conscience of Russia. Th e Anonymous Fourteenth-Century Poet. He was active in the late fourteenth ...

read more

Notes on Translators

pdf iconDownload PDF (114.2 KB)
pp. 437-446

William Arrowsmith (Orange, New Jersey, 1924?92). A founder of the Hud-son Review and a classics professor, he was an eminent translator of Greek dramas. In 1980 he received the National Book Award in Translation for Hard Paul Blackburn (St. Albans, Vermont, 1926?71). A prominent Black Moun-tain poet, he studied Proven?al at the University of Toulouse as a Fulbright ...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (143.1 KB)
pp. 447-460

Back Flap, Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (416.3 KB)
pp. 461-462


E-ISBN-13: 9780815652472
E-ISBN-10: 081565247X
Print-ISBN-13: 9780815610274
Print-ISBN-10: 0815610270

Page Count: 448
Publication Year: 2013

Recommend

UPCC logo

Subject Headings

  • Poetry -- Translations into English.
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access