We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Prison, Inc.

A Convict Exposes Life Inside a Private Prison

K.C. Carceral, Thomas Bernard

Publication Year: 2006

Prison, Inc. provides a first-hand account of life behind bars in a controversial new type of prison facility: the private prison. These for-profit prisons are becoming increasingly popular as state budgets get tighter. Yet as privatization is seen as a necessary and cost-saving measure, not much is known about how these facilities are run and whether or not they can effectively watch over this difficult and dangerous population. For the first time, Prison, Inc. provides a look inside one of these private prisons as told through the eyes of an actual inmate, K.C. Carceral who has been in the prison system for over twenty years.

Published by: NYU Press

read more

Foreword

pdf iconDownload PDF (42.3 KB)
pp. ix-xvi

This book is a case study of a privately owned prison intended to provide you, the reader, with an accurate glimpse into prison life. It follows the events that occurred with the prison's descent into chaos and its subsequent climb back toward order and control...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (16.0 KB)
pp. xvii-xviii

I would like to thank all those who have come together with me to produce this second book. Again, I find myself indebted to Thomas Bernard from the Pennsylvania State University. Without his dedication over the years in helping me find my way...

Prison, Inc.

pdf iconDownload PDF (14.4 KB)
pp. xix-xx

Part I. Welcome to Enterprise

read more

1. The Politics of Enterprise Prison

pdf iconDownload PDF (44.7 KB)
pp. 3-9

After eighteen years in the Northern State Prison System, I was waiting to be shipped to yet another prison. This would be the ninth prison I had entered since my incarceration, but this prison would be nothing like the previous ones...

read more

2. Orientation

pdf iconDownload PDF (54.1 KB)
pp. 10-20

As I looked at my new home, I could see the place was built cheap. Very cheap! Everything was concrete or steel. Most of the concrete was prefabricated and trucked in. There were cracks everywhere-not hairline cracks but cracks so big you could put your finger in them...

read more

3. New Prison Problems

pdf iconDownload PDF (56.7 KB)
pp. 21-32

This was a brand-new prison and the mayhem had started. The administration was creating rules as they went along, but no one followed or enforced them. No one seemed to care. Getting staff to do things was next to impossible...

Part II. Guerrilla Warfare

read more

4. Wild Wild West

pdf iconDownload PDF (57.6 KB)
pp. 35-48

"Hmm, what?" Mark said as he came out of his sleep. A pounding sound was coming from somewhere. Mark had been my cellie in orientation, but we were split when they moved us to the new housing pod-most of us went into cells that already had someone in them. Then my cellie took a job...

read more

5. Beat Down Crew

pdf iconDownload PDF (51.3 KB)
pp. 49-60

The housing unit where I was living was changed into an educational unit, and so we were all moved off into new units and new cells. I was moved onto the unit that most inmates called the Aryan unit. That was because all the Aryans lived there. Out of forty prisoners on the unit, there were maybe five Blacks who lived there, and maybe five Whites who were not Aryan. I was one of those five Whites...

read more

6. The Zoo

pdf iconDownload PDF (61.5 KB)
pp. 61-76

"Hey Officer, come here God dammit," the man in 102 yelled under his seg door for the third time. "What do you need?" the officer replied rather disgusted. Officer Pooch was young, maybe twenty-one or twenty-two years old. By his facial gestures, you could...

Part III. My Tour

read more

7. Caught Up

pdf iconDownload PDF (44.6 KB)
pp. 79-87

I had been at Enterprise prison now for about six months. I had been living on the "Aryan" pod with Steel and Hammer, but after they assaulted Mark, the unit manager decided that there were just too many White prisoners on that pod...

read more

8. The Other Enemy

pdf iconDownload PDF (63.3 KB)
pp. 88-104

"Hi. I am Captain Drinks," he said to Jon and I. About eleven o'clock that night after my assault, the third shift supervisor arrived at our cell. This was the same shift supervisor who had been indicted for assaulting a prisoner. "I was told someone in this cell got beat up pretty bad."...

read more

9. Gang Related

pdf iconDownload PDF (43.4 KB)
pp. 105-113

"Hey, Dore wants to hollar at you,"a young cat named Jade said. I looked up from my letter on the dayroom table. Most everyone left for rec and the unit was quiet. "Dore? Who the hell is Dore?" "He's my cellie in 201!"...

read more

10. Seg Time

pdf iconDownload PDF (69.8 KB)
pp. 114-132

"Who are you?" "Inmate, Anonymous," I stated. "You're goin' to lockup," he authoritatively announced. I was now talking with the first shift supervisor. One thing you generally find in prison: the higher up the chain of command...

Part IV. An Exercise in Futility

read more

11. Riot

pdf iconDownload PDF (54.3 KB)
pp. 135-147

Once I was back in general population, the gangbangers started to threaten and stalk me. They tried to intimidate me, but I wouldn't bend. And soon, something bigger than me distracted their attention...

read more

12. Lockdown

pdf iconDownload PDF (53.4 KB)
pp. 148-160

"Fuckers, our milk has been sitting outside the cell since six thirty this morning," my cellie said as I climbed out of bed. The riot was over. The chowhall was tore-up. And we were on lockdown. Every day started out the same way. He always complained. All the cellies I'd had were starting to blend into one...

read more

13. Aftermath

pdf iconDownload PDF (46.3 KB)
pp. 161-170

"morning," Assistant Warden Tate said to all those in the office for the meeting. "I want to touch on some areas of the seg unit and disciplinary system. First, no man leaves early from seg. No time served, no credit for the days they spend there before their hearing."...

Part V. Taking Control

read more

14. The Masters

pdf iconDownload PDF (61.3 KB)
pp. 173-189

"Have you been out in the hallways?" Henry asked as we sat at the dayroom table. "They are checking everyone in the hallway. You can't get past the first crash gate without a pass. They also added more signs in the hallways, too. Now I think they have them...

read more

15. The Servants

pdf iconDownload PDF (55.3 KB)
pp. 190-203

"Well, fellas, it's been a good lunch but I got to go back a little early to use the facilities before my cellie returns." I deposited my tray and hit the hallway following a shorter Black dude. I had seen his face around but didn't personally know him...

read more

16. The Power

pdf iconDownload PDF (47.8 KB)
pp. 204-212

"Hey Lowe," I greeted him once he checked in at the officer's desk. "Don't look like too much laundry today." "All right. No it don't"...

Part VI. Analysis

read more

17. Factors Contributing to Violence and Its Control

pdf iconDownload PDF (76.2 KB)
pp. 215-236

This book tells a story about violence and its control in a particular prison. Enterprise had many problems that were accompanied by and seemed to cause sharply escalating violence. The violence culminated in the beat down crews that assaulted...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF (36.6 KB)
pp. 237-240

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF (36.1 KB)
pp. 241-246

read more

About the Author and the Editor

pdf iconDownload PDF (24.4 KB)
p. 247-247

The author is K. C. Carceral, a pseudonym for a prisoner who has been incarcerated since 1982. He entered prison shortly after graduating from high school and continued his education in prison. He now holds an Associates degree as a Paralegal and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration...


E-ISBN-13: 9780814772430
E-ISBN-10: 0814772439
Print-ISBN-13: 9780814799543
Print-ISBN-10: 081479954X

Page Count: 268
Publication Year: 2006

Research Areas

Recommend

UPCC logo

Subject Headings

  • Carceral, K. C.
  • Prisoners -- United States -- Biography.
  • Corrections -- Contracting out -- United States -- Case studies.
  • Prisons -- United States -- Case studies.
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access