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Emerging Evangelicals

Faith, Modernity, and the Desire for Authenticity

James Bielo, 0, 0

Publication Year: 2011

Published by: NYU Press

Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-

Figures and Tables

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pp. ix-

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

The Department of Anthropology at Miami University provided countless forms of support for this project. In particular, I would like to thank Linda Marchant, Leighton Peterson, Mark Allen Peterson, John Cinnamon, M. Cameron Hay, Neringa Klumbyte, Susan Paulson, and Kathy Erbaugh...

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Introduction: Conceptualizing Emerging Evangelicalism

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pp. 1-27

It was 4:30 p.m., mid-June 2009, and I had just finished a three-hour interview, preceded by two hours of talk, food, and coffee. The day had started with no anticipation of anything unexpected. I was to interview Aaron, a campus pastor in his late thirties. We had arranged to meet for lunch in...

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1. Stories of Deconversion

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pp. 28-46

I spent two hours on June 25, 2003 interviewing a man named Paul. He was in his late forties and a deacon at a rural Nazarene congregation. Paul was a conservative Evangelical, and there was nothing Emerging about him. I was doing fieldwork with three congregations, focusing on the circulation...

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2. Ironies of Faith

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pp. 47-69

March 25, 2008: East Lansing, Michigan. Tonight I witnessed one of the oddest scenes I can recall in eight years of fieldwork with American Christians. It was ten o’clock on a weekday night. A tall, lanky man stood in front of a pulpit. His hair was short and neatly trimmed. He wore nondescript...

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3. Ancient-Future I: Experiencing God [Includes Image Plates]

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pp. 70-97

The December 2007 issue of U.S. News and World Report, one of a few widely circulated news periodicals reliably perched in grocery store check-out aisles, was entitled: “A Return to Ritual: why many modern worshipers, including Catholics, Jews, and evangelicals are embracing tradition...

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4. Ancient-Future II: Everyday Monastics

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pp. 98-117

In late October 2008 I waited in a coffee shop for Glenn. It was a Friday afternoon and the atmosphere was bustling, nearly frenetic. The activity was explained by the start of weekend socializing, the unseasonably warm, sunny weather and a fast approaching presidential election. Political...

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5. Missional I: Everyday Missionaries

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pp. 118-137

As a worship consultant Lilly is, relatively speaking, a success. She travels regularly as a paid speaker at conferences, churches, and workshops to help Christian communities develop ancient-future worship events. She coauthored a manual about creating sacred spaces, published by a major...

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6. Missional II: Kingdom Theologies

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pp. 138-156

I reviewed the diagram once more before holding it up to show everyone. For several minutes I had been sketching it in my field notebook. In the middle of the page was one word, in capital letters, “KINGDOM.” Curved and straight lines extended in all directions from this centerpiece. Capping...

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7. Church Planting I: A New Work

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pp. 157-177

From the audience of about fifty people, a young man who looked to be in his late twenties asked, “When you have a team ready to plant, how do you find a church willing to mentor you?” Three of the four panelists...

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8. Church Planting II: Sense of Place

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pp. 178-194

Doing ethnography with missional church planters in Cincinnati proved to be fortuitous. Neighborhoods are the reason. Cincinnati—much like New York or Chicago—is a city defined by its collection of distinct neighborhood enclaves. When you ask Cincinnatians where they live—or for...

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Conclusion: Dialogic Evangelicalism

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pp. 195-203

On Saturday, October 2, 2010, at 9 p.m. I was standing in the scene that opened this book, the neighborhood street corner in Norwood between 1801 and St. E. Looking in three directions the view repeated: silent streets, empty sidewalks, half-lit by dim street lights. Looking west, the view was...

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Appendix. Ethnographic Consultants

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pp. 205-209

The following table introduces the 90 individuals (22 women; 68 men) who were my ethnographic consultants. My fieldwork brought me into contact with many others who were affiliated with, interested in,...

References

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pp. 211-219

Index

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pp. 221-223

About the Author

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pp. 225-


E-ISBN-13: 9780814723234
E-ISBN-10: 0814723233
Print-ISBN-13: 9780814789544
Print-ISBN-10: 0814789544

Page Count: 256
Publication Year: 2011

Research Areas

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Subject Headings

  • Emerging church movement -- United States.
  • Evangelicalism -- United States.
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