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The Complete Works of Liudprand of Cremona (Medieval Texts in Translation)

Liudprand of Cremona

Publication Year: 2012

This modern English translation of all the surviving literary compositions ascribed to Liudprand, the bishop of Cremona from 962 to 972, offers unrivaled insight into society and culture in western Europe during the "iron century."

Published by: The Catholic University of America Press

Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

This translation of Liudprand’s known writings was inspired by Thomas Noble, whom I wish to thank both for his original idea and for his later suggestions. The translation depends on the edition of Liudprand’s works by Paolo Chiesa. Chiesa improved on the previous editions in several regards, ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. 3-40

Liudprand of Cremona was born around 920 and died in 972. In the course of the fifty-odd years he lived, he used several names, though all were ultimately related to that of Liutprand, the most successful king of the Lombards, who died in 741. ...

Retribution

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Book One

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pp. 41-71

For two years, dearest father, because of the smallness of my talent, I have neglected that request by which you urged that I put down in writing the deeds of the emperors and kings of all Europe, not as one who, reliant on hearsay, can be doubted, but as one who is reliable, like an eyewitness. ...

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Book Two

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pp. 71-107

1. After the life-blood of King Arnulf, deserting his limbs, left his body lifeless, his son Louis was ordained king by all the people.1 But the death of so great a man could not escape the notice of the Hungarians, just as it could not escape anyone in the whole world; ...

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Book Three

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pp. 108-138

1. I do not doubt, most holy father, that you wonder quite a bit about the title of this work. Perhaps you say: “Since he demonstrates the deeds of illustrious men, why does he insert the title Retribution?” To which I answer: the purpose of this work is this: namely, to depict, make public, ...

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Book Four

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pp. 139-168

1. The events presented up to this point, most holy priest, I wrote down just as I heard them related by very serious men who had observed them; the rest of the events to be related I will explain just as I witnessed them.1 At that time I was so prized because I obtained King Hugh’s favor by the sweetness of my voice; ...

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Book Five

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pp. 168-194

1. It happened that after the deaths of Eberhard and Gislebert and also the imprisonment of the king’s brother Henry, along with all the magnates rushing from all over to the king to congratulate him, there also came the very rich man Hermann, duke of the Swabians. ...

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Book Six

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pp. 195-202

1. The nature of the present time would turn me into a writer of tragedies instead of histories, unless the Lord “set a table in my sight against those who trouble me.”1 For I cannot explain by how many losses I am battered, having set out as a pilgrim, and it would suit my external persona better to weep than to write. ...

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Homily

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pp. 203-218

1. Most beloved brothers, we preach to you1 about Jesus Christ and him crucified, something that is “to the Jews indeed a stumbling block and to the Gentiles foolishness.”2 For indeed we confess that the Lord Jesus is at once God and Son of God, coequal with God the Father, consubstantial, equally omnipotent, ...

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Concerning King Otto

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pp. 219-237

1. It was the period when Berengar and Adalbert ruled, or rather ravaged, in Italy and, to be more truthful, exercised their tyranny.1 The supreme pontiff and universal Pope John XII, whose church was then all-too-familiar with the savagery of the aforementioned Berengar and Adalbert, sent [two] ambassadors of the holy Roman church, ...

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The Embassy of Liudprand

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pp. 238-284

Liudprand, bishop of the holy Cremonese church, wishes, desires, and hopes that the Ottonians, the utterly unconquered, august emperors of the Romans, and the most glorious august empress Adelheid1 may always be well, prosper, and triumph. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 285-290

Index

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pp. 291-296


E-ISBN-13: 9780813216966
Print-ISBN-13: 9780813215068

Page Count: 309
Publication Year: 2012

Series Title: Medieval texts in translation