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Don Álvaro, or, The Force of Fate

Ángel de Saavedra

Publication Year: 2012

In this English edition designed for either classroom use or performance, Robert Fedorchek presents a readable translation faithful to the tone and spirit of the original.

Published by: The Catholic University of America Press

Title Page, Copyright

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CONTENTS

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pp. vii-

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Translator’s Preface

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pp. ix-xii

On Sunday, March 22, 1835, Don Álvaro, or the Force of Fate (Don Álvaro o la fuerza del sino) by Ángel de Saavedra, duke of Rivas (1791–1865), premiered at the Teatro del Príncipe in Madrid. It had a run of eleven days, which, by the standards of the time, made it a success.1 And it changed the Spanish stage at...

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-

Don Álvaro, or the Force of Fate (Don Álvaro o la fuerza del sino) is a work that is required reading for all serious students and scholars of Spanish literature. The work has not, however, been universally acknowledged as a masterpiece: when it was first performed in 1835, it immediately caused a scandal, and...

DON ÁLVARO, OR THE FORCE OF FATE

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pp. 1-

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Cast Of Characters

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pp. 3-4

The stage reproduces the approach to the old pontoon bridge, passable on the right, that connects the suburb of Triana with Seville. In the foreground, also on the right, is a water-vending stall or booth fashioned from boards and sections of canvas, with a sign that reads “Water...

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Act 1

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pp. 5-30

The stage reproduces the approach to the old pontoon bridge, passable on the right, that connects the suburb of Triana with Seville. In the foreground, also on the right, is a water-vending stall or booth fashioned from boards and sections of canvas, with a sign that reads “Water from Tomares...

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Act 2

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pp. 31-61

It is nighttime. The stage reproduces the kitchen of an inn in the town of Hornachuelos.1 In the foreground are the hearth and fireplace. On the left is the entry door, and on the right two practicable doors. On one side there is a long pine table, surrounded by rustic chairs, everything illuminated by one big oil lamp. The innkeeper and the mayor are...

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Act 3

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pp. 62-86

The stage reproduces a small room, the quarters of profligate officers. Hanging on the walls, in disarray, are uniforms, cloaks, saddles, arms, etc.; in the middle stands a table with a green cover, and on it are two bronze candleholders with tallow candles; seated around the table are four officers...

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Act 4

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pp. 87-110

The stage reproduces a small room that serves as military quarters. Don Álvaro and Don Carlos DON CARLOS. Today, as you happily complete your convalescence, how’s your state of health? Is it completely sound? Do you notice any aftereffects...

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Act 5

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pp. 111-138

The theater reproduces the interior of the lower cloister of the Monastery of Los Ángeles, which should be an unassuming corridor that runs around a small courtyard with orange trees, oleander, and jasmine. On the left is the porter’s door; on the right, the stairs. The setting, or drop curtain, should be downstage so that others upstage can appear in order...

Select Bibliography

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pp. 139-142


E-ISBN-13: 9780813216461
Print-ISBN-13: 9780813213972

Page Count: 174
Publication Year: 2012