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Commentary on the Twelve Prophets, Volume 2 (The Fathers of the Church, Volume 116)

Saint Cyril of Alexandria

Publication Year: 2012

Published by: The Catholic University of America Press

Cover

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p. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Abbreviations

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pp. vii-viii

Select Bibliography

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pp. ix-x

Commentary on the Prophet Amos

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Preface to the Commentary on Amos

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pp. 5-6

Amos was a goatherd, raised in the ways and norms of shepherds. He passed his life in the wilderness to the south of the country of the Jews, which stretched from the shores of the Indian sea to the land of the Persians, and where countless barbarian nations grazed their stock. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter One

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pp. 7-26

He is saying that these are the words of prophecy of Amos from Tekoa, which came in Akkarim. Now, it should be realized that the Hebrew has no knowledge at all of this reading, in Akkarim, saying only, “The words of Amos from Tekoa.” For their part the other translators put “cattlemen” for in Akkarim. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Two

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pp. 27-40

The Moabites likewise were guilty of such extreme impiety as to exceed even the inherent clemency and patience of the God of all. Their crime was a sin against a corpse, namely, burning the bones of the king of Idumea, and burning them in such a way as to reduce them to dust and ashes. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Three

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pp. 41-54

The verse could be taken as addressed to the whole of Israel, not citing Judah and Ephraim separately, but as though addressing a unit comprising every tribe, since every tribe of Israel was led out of the land of Egypt. With no one excluded, then, they are bidden to listen to what comes from God.1 What was it? ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Four

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pp. 55-65

The people of Samaria were conspicuous for extreme arrogance and luxury, surpassing all others for the abundance of their wealth; as I said, they built themselves fine and lavish houses suited to the seasons—I mean winter and summer—which the oracle announced in advance would completely and utterly perish. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Five

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pp. 66-82

On learning in advance of the troubles befalling some people, the blessed prophets were filled with terror at the prospect and grieved bitterly for them as brethren; sometimes they delivered their reproof ardently, as if moved by love to weeping, and prompting them to alertness by prediction of all that had yet to occur. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Six

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pp. 83-96

Once again the verse deplores not only the people from Ephraim, or the two tribes in Samaria, but also those from Judah and Benjamin. He had previously demonstrated that even those before them were always unstable and fickle in mind, having made a calf and adopted the tent of Moloch. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Seven

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pp. 97-104

God reveals to the prophet what nation will be brought upon the people of Israel, or what harm will befall them; on the other hand, he follows his custom of informing him of what will be done through things of which he has a precise knowledge. ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Eight

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pp. 105-117

The prophet's discourse continues on its way; the matters that have been touched on received adequate treatment, and the order of the visions is adjusted to the purpose proper to it. So he saw the vast numbers of the Assyrians like an early plague of locusts, and with them Gog, or Sennacherib, ...

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Commentary on Amos, Chapter Nine

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pp. 118-132

With the eye of their mind enlightened by the torch of the Spirit, the blessed prophets were not only beneficiaries of knowledge of the future, but also at times had a vision of the events themselves as though they were painted on a tablet. ...

Commentary on the Prophet Obadiah

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Preface to the Commentary on Obadiah/Commentary on Obadiah

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pp. 135-144

It is likely that Obadiah likewise prophesied at the same time as Joel, and was, as it were, accorded the same vision and shared the explanation. While the divinely inspired Joel, remember, at the very end of his prophecy says, “Egypt will become a wasteland, and Idumea a desolate countryside for the wrongs done to the children of Judah, ...

Commentary on the Prophet Jonah

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Preface to the Commentary on Jonah

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pp. 147-150

The divinely inspired Jonah was the son of Amittai, and came from Gath-hepher, a little city or town of the land of the Jews, so the story goes. He probably delivered his prophecy at the same time as those before him, namely, Hosea, Amos, Micah, and the rest.1 You could find him uttering a great number of oracles to the Jewish populace, ...

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Commentary on Jonah, Chapter One

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pp. 151-162

With an understanding of the ministry and mission of Jonah’s prophecy, you would be quite right to make the opportune remark in terms of the praise uttered by blessed Paul, “Is he the God of Jews only, and not of gentiles also? In fact, he is the God of gentiles also, since God is one, ...

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Commentary on Jonah, Chapter Two

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pp. 163-166

Coming to no harm, using the sea monster as a home, thinking clearly, and suffering no kind of ill effects of body or mind, he sensed divine assistance, knowing God is benevolent. On the other hand, not unaware that what had happened was due to his reluctance for ministry, he turned to prayer, uttering sentiments of thanksgiving, ...

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Commentary on Jonah, Chapter Three

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pp. 167-172

Taking advantage of his more ardent enthusiasm, then, God bids him again go to Nineveh and adopt the same message communicated to him at the outset, the meaning of “a clamor has ascended to me from their wickedness.” Although I previously stated what relates to Christ, therefore, I shall still repeat it, feeling no reluctance; ...

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Commentary on Jonah, Chapter Four

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pp. 173-178

Since God compassionate (593) to those who avert the effects of wrath by repentance, even when the time had passed for the decreed outcome, and what had been foretold was due to occur and yet none of the expectations had come to pass, the blessed Jonah was extremely distressed. ...

Commentary on the Prophet Micah

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Preface to the Commentary on Micah

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pp. 181-182

The single purpose of all the holy prophets, dear also to God, was to persuade Israel to decide to part company resolutely with deception and instead to opt for serving God, living and true, and glorying in the ornaments of righteousness by removing as far as possible their involvement in wrongdoing. ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter One

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pp. 183-198

Again it should be understood that the Hebrew text has Moresheth in place of Morathi, the intention being to give the name not of the father but of his native place; they say Morathi was a town or little city of the country of the Jews. The other translators agree with this text as well; so Morathi would not be the prophet’s father; ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Two

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pp. 199-211

When the god of all delivers a long passage on the punishment of some people, he begins by citing their crimes and exposing the magnitude of their impiety to avoid being thought harsh and wrathful instead of as a just Judge properly weighing up each one’s faults and treating the guilty according to their works. ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Three

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pp. 212-220

The one who opened the gates to those making war on Israel, who made everything smooth for them and overcame the difficulties so that they might then proceed with great ease and dominate the resistance without effort, is the Lord, who leads them. ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Four

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pp. 221-231

In this is now recognized a clear prediction of the church from the nations. When Israel according to the flesh was removed from the scene, sacrifices according to the Law were at an end, the priesthood of the bloodline of Levi deserted, the celebrated Temple itself burnt down, and Jerusalem left desolate, ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Five

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pp. 232-245

Many peoples and many nations will be assembled on Zion. Then, when they expected to exult over it and mock it, they were beaten and crushed, since God cast them under the feet of the victors in the manner (673) of a sheaf. The country of the Samaritans was captured and destroyed, wasted by war, ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Six

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pp. 246-256

The passage is exhortatory, and, as it were, cries out in protest (692) against the Jews’ insensitivity in giving no importance to the divine words, despite their being gentle and restrained [words], as though from a father demonstrating sincerity of love for his children and giving them no grounds for obduracy. ...

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Commentary on Micah, Chapter Seven

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pp. 257-278

Out of love the prophet mocks Israel for being on the point of going off to destruction, and of reaching such a small number that very few would in the end be left. They would be like what falls from the sheaves, which the hands of the harvesters pass by, whereas the few survivors are quick to collect even stubble because of dire need. ...

Commentary on the Prophet Nahum

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Preface to the Commentary on Nahum

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pp. 281-282

Each of the holy prophets was employed in some useful and demanding business at times for the purpose of ministering to the divine decrees and transmitting to people the messages from on high. Some foretold to Israel impending misfortunes so as to terrify them in their sins, ...

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Commentary on Nahum, Chapter One

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pp. 283-305

He begins by specifying the purpose of the prophecy, and helpfully makes precise the focus of his attention. He then makes clear who is speaking and from where he comes, saying it is an oracle; that is to say, the prophecy “taken up” and set in our hands has to do with nothing else than Nineveh—in other words, ...

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Commentary on Nahum, Chapter Two

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pp. 306-315

To suggest in a compressed fashion that the necessary destruction of Nineveh would without any doubt happen, he says that it is finished, thus indicating the wish for its consummation. He also says it is gone, that is, completely felled and utterly done away with.1 ...

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Commentary on Nahum, Chapter Three

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pp. 316-328

He gave it the name city of blood; those who reigned over Nineveh were bloodthirsty and disposed to murder, while on a different note its inhabitants were warlike, ever on the alert to conduct wild sorties against whomever they met. He says it was false because awash with idols, whose utter falsity could not be gainsaid; ...

Commentary on the Prophet Habakkuk

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Preface to the Commentary on Habakkuk

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pp. 331-332

While the present prophecy has also been developed for us with great wisdom and skill, we shall find it concentrating on God’s management of things in a way becoming the saints. It becomes even the saints, in fact, to make the open admission, “It is not you who are speaking, but the Spirit of your Father speaking in you.” ...

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Commentary on Habakkuk, Chapter One

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pp. 333-347

By ‘oracle’ here he refers to reception of the vision, or premonition, that he had when God gave it. It is he, after all, who, according to Scripture, multiplied visions, and he who spoke to prophets, foretelling the future to them through the Holy Spirit and, as it were, setting it before their sight as though already happening.1 ...

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Commentary on Habakkuk, Chapter Two

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pp. 348-365

In this he explains to us a prophetic mystery. It was customary with the holy ones, you see, if they wanted to learn what was from God and to gain knowledge of the future when he was inspiring their mind and heart, to remove their mind far from distractions, concerns, and every care of this life, ...

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Commentary on Habakkuk, Chapter Three

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pp. 366-400

Having thoroughly presented the message to the Babylonian, and adequately foretold that those who sacked the holy city and deported Israel in captivity would pay a heavy penalty, he appositely moves to the mystery of Christ. And as though the redemption had already occurred in the case of a single nation individually, ...

Indices

Index of Proper Names

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pp. 403-414

Index of Holy Scripture

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pp. 415-432


E-ISBN-13: 9780813212166
Print-ISBN-13: 9780813201160

Page Count: 442
Publication Year: 2012

Series Title: The Fathers of the church ;

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Subject Headings

  • Bible. O.T. Minor Prophets -- Commentaries.
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