We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Kant's Conception of Pedagogy

Toward Education for Freedom

G. Felicitas Munzel

Publication Year: 2012

Although he was involved in the education debates of his time, it is widely held that in his mature philosophical writings Immanuel Kant is silent on the subject. In her groundbreaking Kant’s Conception of Pedagogy, G. Felicitas Munzel finds extant in Kant’s writings the so-called missing critical treatise on education; it appears in the Doctrines of Method with which he concludes each of his major works. Here Kant identifies the fundamental principles for the cultivation of reason’s judgment when it comes to cognition, beauty, nature, and the exercise of morality while subject to the passions and inclinations that characterize the human experience. From her analysis, Munzel extrapolates principles for a cosmopolitan education that parallels the structure of Kant’s republican constitution for perpetual peace. With the formal principles in place, the argument concludes with a query of the material principles that would fulfill the formal conditions required for an education for freedom.

Published by: Northwestern University Press

Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (24.5 KB)
p. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Frontispiece

pdf iconDownload PDF (132.5 KB)
pp. 2-9

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (45.4 KB)
pp. ix-11

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (66.1 KB)
pp. xi-xii

I am much indebted to the Earhart Foundation, DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst [German Academic Exchange Service]), and the Offi ce of the Dean and the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts of the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame, for research support at various stages of this project. Special thanks are due to Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Otfried Höffe for his support of my DAAD grant and his generous...

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF (91.7 KB)
pp. xiii-xiv

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (136.4 KB)
pp. xv-31

In correspondence that bookends the appearance of the two editions of the Critique of Pure Reason, Immanuel Kant testifi es to the pedagogical, moral purpose of his entire life’s work.1 He lived and wrote during the peak of the eighteenth- century pedagogical debates whose roots stretch back to the sixteenth century and exert their influence forward into the nineteenth century. During Kant’s...

Part 1. Historic and Philosophic Context: Eighteenth-Century Conceptions of Education, Enlightenment, and Human Self-Understanding

read more

1. The Eighteenth Century as a Pedagogical Age

pdf iconDownload PDF (321.2 KB)
pp. 5-81

The issue of the possibility and nature of education, in relation to the further question of the truth of human nature and of the human condition to which education is a response, is complex at any time and any place. Since for the eighteenth century it was an especially complex issue, it is helpful to begin with a synoptic overview of the nature of the question of education in the age. On the one hand...

read more

2. Texts and Movements: Consequences of Human Self-Understanding for Conceptions of Education

pdf iconDownload PDF (399.3 KB)
pp. 82-184

The issue of the possibility and nature of education, in relation to the further question of the truth of human nature and of the human condition to which education is a response, is complex at any time and any place. Since for the eighteenth century it was an especially complex issue, it is helpful to begin with a synoptic overview of the nature of the question of education in the age. On the one hand...

Part 2. Attempt at a Pedagogical Instauration

pdf iconDownload PDF (15.9 KB)
pp. 185-215

read more

3. Kant’s Idea of Education

pdf iconDownload PDF (247.1 KB)
pp. 187-232

To develop the account of the program of education which Kant offers, in this chapter we begin by following out Kant’s path from popular modes of instruction and his criticism of these to his own articulation of an idea of education that in its “form befi ts humanity” and develops the human natural aptitudes. In the process, Kant’s own conception of human nature (and where and why he parts company with his contemporaries) comes into view. From...

read more

4. Formal Transcendental Principles for Education for Inner Freedom: Condition for and Critical Counterpart to External Freedom

pdf iconDownload PDF (272.4 KB)
pp. 233-293

To this point in our interpretation, the thrust of our examination of Kant’s idea of an education indicates the need for cultivating a way of conducting ourselves in thought (Denkungsart) such that all our cognitive processes are rightly ordered in accordance with the determination and vocation of ourselves as human, rational, moral beings in the world. To do so is to make the transcendental idea of the highest good effi cacious in human life, or as we saw...

read more

5. Toward Material Principles Fulfilling Formal Conditions for Education for Freedom: Philosophy as Paideia and the Liberal Arts

pdf iconDownload PDF (333.9 KB)
pp. 294-375

The tradition that has borne the banner of an education for freedom is that of the liberal arts, while the sense of philosophy to which paideia is integral is its classical conception as the quintessentially free human activity. In this chapter we will explore the role of philosophy and the liberal arts in the concrete (material) translation of the formal Kantian articles of education into a program for...

read more

Epilogue: Relevance for Today

pdf iconDownload PDF (111.2 KB)
pp. 376-384

Lincoln concluded his 1863 Gettysburg Address with a call to renewed dedication to freedom, so that “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Some eighty years later, Robert Maynard Hutchins exhorted that “either we must abandon the ideal of freedom or we must educate our people for freedom. . . . And since it is a long job, and one upon which the fate of our country in war and peace may depend, we shall...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF (198.5 KB)
pp. 385-420

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (140.8 KB)
pp. 421-438

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF (50.4 KB)
pp. 439-468


E-ISBN-13: 9780810165748
Print-ISBN-13: 9780810128019

Publication Year: 2012

Edition: 1
Series Title: Topics In Historical Philosophy
Series Editor Byline: McCumber, John

Research Areas

Recommend

UPCC logo

Subject Headings

  • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804.
  • Education -- Philosophy -- History -- 18th century.
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access