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Flowering Plants

Nightshades to Mistletoe

Robert H. Mohlenbrock

Publication Year: 1990

This sixth volume of dicots contains three orders and eight families. The orders included are Solanales, Campanulales, and Santalales. Within the Solanales are the families Solanaceae, Convolvulaceae, Cuscutaceae, and Polemoniaceae. The Campanulales contain only the family Campanulaceae. The Santalales include the families Celastraceae, Santalaceae, and Viscaceae. As with each volume in this series Mohlenbrock includes a complete plant description, illustrations showing diagnostic features, distribution maps, and ecological notes.

Published by: Southern Illinois University Press

Cover

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pp. 1-3

Title Page

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p. 4-4

Copyright

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p. 5-5

Contents

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pp. v-7

Illustrations

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pp. vii-ix

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Foreword

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pp. xi-15

This is the sixth volume in The Illustrated Flora of Illinois series devoted to dicotyledons, or dicot plants. Five volumes of monocotyledonous plants, or monocots, have been published previously, as well as single volumes on ferns and diatoms. The concept of The Illustrated Flora of Illinois is to produce a multivolumed...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-5

Plants that produce flowers are divided into two groups, the dicotyledons and the monocotyledons. Dicotyledons, or dicots, form two "seed leaves," or cotyledons, when the seed germinates. Monocotyledons, or monocots, form only a single "seed leaf." In the world, as in Illinois, dicots...

Descriptions and Illustrations

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pp. 7-22

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Solanaceae -- Nightshade Family

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pp. 7-72

Herbs or less frequently somewhat woody, rarely climbing; leaves usually alternate, simple or compound; inflorescence various; flowers perfect, actinomorphic; sepals 5, united, often persistent on the fruit; petals 5, united into a rotate, campanulate, or funnelform corolla; stamens usually...

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Convolvulacea -- Morning-Glory Family

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pp. 72-102

Herbs, shrubs, or trees, sometimes twining, sometimes with latex; leaves alternate, simple, without stipules; inflorescence cymose, or the flower solitary; flowers perfect, actinomorphic, bracteate; sepals 5, usually free; corolla mostly tubular, 5-lobed or entire; stamens 5, free, attached...

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Cuscutaceae -- Dodder Family

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pp. 102-121

Twining, annual parasitic herbs, without chlorophyll, attached to hosts by means of haustoria; stems threadlike, orange or yellow; leaves scalelike, much reduced, without chlorophyll; flowers in cymes, sometimes densely crowded and resembling a head or spike, perfect, actinomorphic...

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Polemoniaceae -- Phlox Family

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pp. 121-149

Annual or perennial herbs, rarely shrubs or small trees; leaves alternate or opposite, simple or compound, without stipules; inflorescence mostly cymose; flowers perfect, actinomorphic; calyx 5-lobed; corolla 5-parted; stamens 5, attached to the corolla tube; disk usually present...

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Campanulaceae -- Bellflower Family

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pp. 150-181

Annual or perennial herbs (in Illinois), rarely woody; latex sometimes present; leaves alternate, simple, without stipules; flowers perfect, actinomorphic or zygomorphic, borne in cymes, racemes, or panicles, or solitary; calyx s-lobed; corolla campanulate or rotate or tubular, sometimes split down...

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Celastraceae -- Bittersweet Family

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pp. 182-198

Woody shrubs, vines, or creepers; leaves alternate or opposite, simple, pinnately veined; flowers in axillary clusters or in terminal inflorescences or solitary, perfect or unisexual, actinomorphic; calyx 4- to 5-parted, very small; petals 4 or 5; free; stamens 4-5, attached to a disk; ovary...

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Santalaceae -- Sandalwood Family

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pp. 198-199

Herbs (in Illinois), shrubs, or trees, often root parasites; leaves simple, alternate or opposite; flowers actinomorphic, perfect or unisexual, borne in axillary or terminal inflorescences or solitary; calyx 4- or 5-parted, united; petals absent; disk present; stamens 4 or 5, usually...

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Viscaceae -- Mistletoe Family

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pp. 199-203

Green parasitic herbs or shrubs, parasitizing the aerial portions of a wide variety of woody hosts; leaves simple, opposite; flowers actinomorphic, perfect or unisexual, borne in various kinds of inflorescences; calyx 2- to 5-parted, usually united below; petals absent...

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Species Excluded

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pp. 205-226

Datura metel L. This species does not occur in Illinois, although the binomial was used by a few earlier Illinois botanists for D. in Ipomoea nil (L.) Roth, attributed to Illinois by several early bot anists, is a species that lives south of Illinois. These early workers Physalis lanceifolia Nees. Rydberg (1896) used this binomial for ...

Summary of the Taxa Treated in This Volume

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pp. 207-230

Glossary

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pp. 211-215

Literature Cited

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pp. 217-219

Index of Plant Names

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pp. 221-224

Author Biography

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pp. 225-245


E-ISBN-13: 9780809380770
Print-ISBN-13: 9780809315673

Page Count: 240
Publication Year: 1990

Series Title: Illustrated Flora of Illinois