We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Robert W. Tebbs, Photographer to Architects

Louisiana Plantations in 1926

Richard Anthony Lewis

Publication Year: 2011

One of the finest architectural photographers in America, Robert W. Tebbs produced the first photographic survey of Louisiana’s plantations in 1926. From those images, now housed in the Louisiana State Museum, and not widely available until now, 119 plates showcasing fifty-two homes are featured here. Richard Anthony Lewis explores Tebbs’s life and career, situating his work along the line of plantation imagery from nineteenth-century woodcuts and paintings to later twentieth-century photographs by John Clarence Laughlin, among others. Providing the family lineage and construction history of each home, Lewis discusses photographic techniques Tebbs used in his alternating panoramic and detail views. A precise documentarian, Tebbs also reveals a poetic sensibility in the plantation photos. His frequent emphasis on aspects of decay, neglect, incompleteness, and loss lends a wistful aura to many of the images—an effect compounded by the fact that many of the homes no longer exist. This noticeable vacillation between objectivity and sentiment, Lewis shows, suggests unfamiliarity and even discomfort with the legacy of slavery. Poised on the brink of social and political reforms, Louisiana in the mid-1920s had made significant strides away from the slave-based agricultural economy that the plantation house often symbolized. Tebbs’s Louisiana plantation photographs capture a literal and cultural past, reflecting a burgeoning national awareness of historic preservation and presenting plantations to us anew. Select plantations included: Ashland/Belle Helene, Avery Island, Belle Chasse, Belmont, Butler-Greenwood, L’Hermitage, Oak Alley, Parlange, René Beauregard House, Rosedown, Seven Oaks, Shadows-on-the-Teche, The Shades, and Waverly.

Published by: Louisiana State University Press

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Frontispiece

pdf iconDownload PDF (220.0 KB)
 

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.1 KB)
pp. vii-viii

read more

FOREWORD

pdf iconDownload PDF (190.1 KB)
pp. ix-xii

It was 1926, and New Orleans jazz was all the rage. Louis Armstrong had his Hot Five, Jelly Roll Morton had the Red Hot Peppers, and King Oliver, the Creole Jazz Band. Women called flappers sported calf-length dresses and short “Eton crop...

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF (180.4 KB)
pp. xiii-

This project originated with a phone call from Margaret Hart Lovecraft, acquisitions editor at the Louisiana State University Press, to Greg Lambousy, director of collections at the Louisiana State Museum. We were gratified to...

read more

INTRODUCTION: Representing Louisiana Plantations, 1926

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.2 MB)
pp. 1-26

In the late spring of 1926, at the apex of his career, New Jersey–based photographer Robert William Tebbs (1875–1945) and his wife, Jeanne (1887–1980), embarked on a monumental expedition through rural Louisiana to photograph plantation architecture. They came...

PHOTOGRAPHS OF LOUISIANA PLANTATION HOUSES

read more

Elmwood Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (222.6 KB)
pp. 29-30

Once located in Jefferson Parish near Harahan, Elmwood has traditionally been cited among the earliest plantations in Louisiana. Tebbs’s photographs combine the picturesque approach with emphasis on exacting precision. Although some authors have suggested that Elmwood was originally built as a one-story plantation house about 1724, it is...

read more

Parlange Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (232.2 KB)
pp. 31-32

Parlange is situated on the banks of False River near New Roads in Pointe Coupée Parish. According to tradition, it was built about 1750–1754 for Vincent de Ternant, Marquis de Dansville-sur-Meuse (ca. 1710–1757), a French immigrant with a land grant from the French...

read more

Voisin Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (195.1 KB)
pp. 33-34

Probably begun in 1785 and completed in 1790 for Jean Baptiste Voisin (fl. 1760– 1790) in St. Charles Parish above Norco, Voisin Plantation is a typical example of the raised-cottage construction characteristic of Louisiana French Colonial architecture. Like many very early houses...

read more

Homeland Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (222.6 KB)
pp. 35-36

Homeland Plantation (also known as Home Place, Homeplace, and the Keller House) is located near Hahnville in St. Charles Parish. Begun as early as 1787–1791, the main house appears to have been completed about 1800 and is among the largest surviving French Colonial plantation...

read more

Ormond Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (219.4 KB)
pp. 37-38

One of the earliest and most intact plantations in Louisiana, Ormond appears to have been built shortly before 1790 for Pierre d’Trépagnier (b. ca. 1740), a retired Spanish colonial official who had received the land about 1772 from Governor Bernardo de Gálvez in recognition...

read more

Labatut Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (265.1 KB)
pp. 39-40

Dozens of writers have proposed that Labatut was built between 1790 and 1810 for Evarist Barra (fl. 1790–1830), a Spanish nobleman who would help defend New Orleans during the War of 1812. However, architectural details and analysis of nails used in construction suggest that the present house was most likely constructed after 1818, about the time that...

read more

Whitney Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (191.4 KB)
pp. 41-42

Located in St. John the Baptist Parish near Vacherie, Whitney Plantation was established about 1790 on land owned by Jean-Jacques Haydel, Sr. (1741–1826) and Nicolas Haydel (1764–1812). In 1803, the Haydels’ modest house was expanded to nearly its present dimensions. Building methods...

read more

Evergreen Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (245.0 KB)
pp. 43-44

Evergreen Plantation is located in St. John the Baptist Parish east of Donaldsonville. The present Greek Revival–style house dates to the early 1830s and is stylistically similar to the contemporary Ellerslie (1835). Brick Tuscan columns, a wide gallery, and fanlight doors are key...

read more

The Cottage Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (251.8 KB)
pp. 45-46

Located north of St. Francisville in West Feliciana Parish, and originally known as China Grove, The Cottage was begun about 1795 on land owned by John Allen (n.d.) and Patrick Holland (n.d.). The oldest, central portion of the main house reflects the Spanish influence in the Felicianas, with low ceilings, one-and-a-half stories, and cypress post-and-beam construction...

read more

Houmas House/Burnside Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (215.1 KB)
pp. 47-48

The origins and chronology of Houmas House, later known as Burnside Plantation, located near Burnside in Ascension Parish, are unclear. Some have proposed that the house dates to about 1774 when Maurice Conway (ca. 1730–1792) and Alexandre Antoine Latil (1726–1791) purchased several thousand acres of land from the Houmas Indians for...

read more

Oakley Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (197.7 KB)
pp. 49-50

Among the most well-known plantations in Louisiana, Oakley is located in West Feliciana Parish, just east of St. Francisville. The plantation was founded on 700 arpents of land granted by the Spanish government in 1796 to Ruffin Gray (b. ca. 1765–1799), who had moved to Homochitto, Mississippi, from Virginia. Gray probably erected a modest...

read more

Three Oaks Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (197.4 KB)
pp. 51-52

Once located in St. Bernard Parish near the site of the Battle of New Orleans, Three Oaks had rather obscure origins. The house photographed by Tebbs apparently stood on the site of an earlier structure used as a hospital during the battle and probably was built by French émigré Sylvan Peyroux (ca. 1770–ca. 1835), a sugar grower and wine importer...

read more

Glendale Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (167.2 KB)
pp. 53-54

In 1805, François Daniel Pain (1751–1812) and his wife, Marie Françoise (née Boissier; 1753–ca. 1820), built Glendale Plantation on 4,200 acres in St. Charles Parish near Lucy. With wide galleries, a hip roof, simple brick piers, cypress colonnettes, and dormers on the side, Glendale is typical of the French Colonial houses built in southern colonies in North America...

read more

The Shades

pdf iconDownload PDF (165.1 KB)
pp. 55-56

The Shades (also known as Scott House or Scott Plantation) is located near Wilson in East Feliciana Parish. William Rochelle, Jr. (n.d.) built the house for Alexander Scott (1780–1844) in 1808. Scott had established the plantation in 1796. Like a handful of plantations in East Feliciana Parish, including Lane Plantation (ca. 1830) and Oakland (ca. 1835...

read more

Old Hickory Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (163.9 KB)
pp. 57-58

The first structures on the property now known as Old Hickory Plantation— located near LaCour in Pointe Coupée Parish—were probably built about 1808 on land owned by Zénon Ledoux (1776–1817) and his wife, Marie Felicité Adelaide Armant (1779–1814). Ledoux had acquired the land...

read more

Butler-Greenwood Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (147.2 KB)
pp. 59-60

Greenwood’s first structures appear to have been built on property on Bayou Sara near St. Francisville in West Feliciana Parish after 1786, the year the Spanish government granted 2,200 acres to Samuel Flower (1751–1813). A surgeon who had moved from Reading...

read more

Hickory Hill Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (184.1 KB)
pp. 61-62

Hickory Hill Plantation is located near Wilson in East Feliciana Parish. Construction on the main house began in 1812 for Captain David Scott McCants (1781–1864) and his wife, Elizabeth McNish McCants (1780–1839), who had moved to Louisiana from Charleston, South Carolina, in 1809 or 1810. The house represents one of the earliest Greek Revival buildings...

read more

L’Hermitage (Hermitage Plantation)

pdf iconDownload PDF (218.5 KB)
pp. 63-64

L’Hermitage is located near Darrow in Ascension Parish. It was built between 1812 and 1819 on land given by Marius Pons Bringier (1752–1820) as a wedding present to his son, Michel Douradou Bringier (1789–1847), and Michel’s wife, Louise Élizabeth Aglaé (née Du Bourg de St...

read more

Asphodel Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (219.5 KB)
pp. 65-66

Asphodel Plantation was established on Carr’s Creek in East Feliciana Parish near Clinton in 1820. The main house was built between 1822 and about 1833 for North Carolinians Benjamin Kendrick (1779–1838) and his wife, Caroline (née Pollard; 1795–1833). They derived the name “Asphodel” from the Greek word for daffodils, which grow in abundance on...

read more

Pleasant View Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (204.6 KB)
pp. 67-68

Begun about 1820 along the south bank of False River in Pointe Coupée Parish, the main house at Pleasant View is a quintessential example of the French Creole style. Although the architect and early owners are unknown, it is counted among the most significant...

read more

Waverly Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (184.2 KB)
pp. 69-70

Waverly Plantation was located in West Feliciana Parish near St. Francisville. It was built in 1821 for the English émigré and physician Henry Baines (1796–1833) and his wife, Emily (née McDermott; n.d.), on land granted to her father, Patrick McDermott (d. 1814), in 1804. Unlike most similar structures, the house was built entirely of wood in the Georgian...

read more

Ellerslie Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (184.3 KB)
pp. 71-72

Ellerslie, also known as Elsie, is located in West Feliciana Parish on Little Bayou Sara, approximately ten miles south of St. Francisville. It was built on twelve thousand acres of land for Judge William Center Wade (1791–1845) and his wife, Olivia Ruffin (née Lane; 1795–1870), between 1828...

read more

Live Oak (or Live Oaks) Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (188.8 KB)
pp. 73-74

Originally from Nashville, Charles H. Dickinson (ca. 1803–1848), together with his wife, Anna M. Turner (ca. 1812–1886), built a four-room main house on his property near Bayou Grosse Tete in Iberville Parish beginning in 1828. Live Oak Plantation was constructed in at least two phases. About 1835, Dickinson merged the first building with the present two...

read more

Hurst-Stauffer House

pdf iconDownload PDF (209.2 KB)
pp. 75-76

Constructed in 1830, the Hurst-Stauffer House was located originally on the 5600 block of Tchoupitoulas Street in New Orleans. Built for Cornelius Hearst (1796– 1851) and his wife, Eleonor (n.d.), the house was designed by an unidentified architect, but details appear...

read more

Greenwood Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (174.1 KB)
pp. 77-78

Greenwood Plantation was located in West Feliciana Parish near St. Francisville. It was built on 12,000 acres between 1830 and 1834 for William Ruffin Barrow (1800– 1862) and his wife, Olivia Ruffin (née Barrow; 1806–1857). Barrow had purchased the land from Oliver Pollock (1737–1823) after Pollock went bankrupt helping to finance the American War for...

read more

Belle Chasse Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (209.4 KB)
pp. 79-80

Belle Chasse Plantation was located thirteen miles south of Gretna in Plaquemines Parish. The early and late history of Belle Chasse is shrouded in mystery. It appears that a house was built on the site sometime between 1803 and 1810 by Joseph Deville de Goutin Bellechasse...

read more

Magnolia Ridge Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (222.4 KB)
pp. 81-82

Magnolia Ridge Plantation, also known as Prescott House, is located in St. Landry Parish, about ten miles north of Opelousas in the town of Washington. It was built for Judge John Moore (n.d.) in the popular Greek Revival style, with six Doric columns and a symmetrical distribution of windows and doors on the upper and lower stories. Brick exposed beneath...

read more

Calumet Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (174.0 KB)
pp. 83-84

Calumet Plantation is located in St. Mary Parish near Patterson. The property was known originally as the O. and N. Cornay Plantation. About 1830, brothers Octave (1805–1869) and Christophe Numa Cornay (b. 1807) built the main house. They had acquired the plantation through their...

read more

Chrétien Point Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (191.7 KB)
pp. 85-86

Chrétien Point Plantation, also known as Gardiner Plantation, is located in St. Landry Parish near Sunset, about ten miles south of Opelousas. Joseph C. Chrétien (1781–1839) is the first recorded land owner, having purchased it on December 7, 1781, from the estate of Louis St. Germain (d. 1780) or Pierre de Clouet (n.d.), one of whom allegedly had received...

read more

Shadows-on-the-Teche

pdf iconDownload PDF (221.2 KB)
pp. 87-88

Shadows-on-the-Teche (also known as The Shadows or Weeks Hall) is located in Iberia Parish in the town of New Iberia. This suburban residence was built in the Greek Revival style between 1831 and 1834 by mason Jeremiah Clark (n.d.) and carpenter James Bedell (n.d.) for David Weeks (1786–1834) and his wife, Mary Clara (née Conrad; 1796–1863...

read more

René Beauregard House

pdf iconDownload PDF (211.1 KB)
pp. 89-90

The René Beauregard House (also known as Bueno Retiro and today as the Malus- Beauregard House) is located at the Chalmette Battlefield just off St. Bernard Highway (LA 46) in St. Bernard Parish. The Battle of New Orleans took place, in part, on the grounds of the property in 1815. The main house was built on land that passed through a complicated series of...

read more

Wakefield Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (211.0 KB)
pp. 91-92

Wakefield Plantation is located in West Feliciana Parish near St. Francisville. It was built in 1833 by Joseph R. Miller (n.d.) for Lewis Sterling (1786–1858). Although essentially indigenous Creole in style, Wakefield has many Greek Revival elements, such as the ill-proportioned...

read more

Rosedown Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (246.4 KB)
pp. 93-94

Rosedown Plantation is located about five miles from St. Francisville in West Feliciana Parish. It was built by contractor Wendell Wright (n.d.)—who also worked as a builder for the West Feliciana Railroad—for Daniel Turnbull (1796–1861) and his wife, Martha Hilliard (née Barrow; 1809–1896), at the exact recorded cost of $13,109.20. Turnbull’s journal...

read more

Welham Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (206.7 KB)
pp. 95-96

Welham Plantation was located in St. James Parish between the towns of Hester and Convent. It was built for William Peter Welham (1801–1860) and his wife, Reine Seraphine (née Terrio; b. 1805), between 1836 and 1839. Establishing the plantation complex, including the main...

read more

Seven Oaks Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (176.3 KB)
pp. 97-98

Seven Oaks Plantation was located in Westwego in Jefferson Parish. The main house appears to have been built by Camille Zeringue (1791–ca. 1872) in the late 1830s. Ownership of the property was complex. The land originally was part of the concession granted to John Law’s Company of the Indies. Camille’s grandfather, Johann Michel Zehringer (ca....

read more

Woodlawn Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (232.9 KB)
pp. 99-100

Woodlawn Plantation was located near Napoleonville in Assumption Parish. Renowned architect Henry Howard (1818–1884) designed the house for William Whitmell Hill Pugh (1811–1906) and his wife, William Ann (née Thompson; 1815–1843). Pugh had moved to Bayou Lafourche with his father, Dr. Whitmell Hill Pugh (d. 1834) and uncles, Augustin...

read more

Oak Alley Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (248.2 KB)
pp. 101-102

Considered by many to be the most iconic Louisiana plantation, Oak Alley is located in Vacherie, in St. James Parish. It was built by contractor George Swainey (or Swainy; n.d.) for Jacques Télésphore Roman III (1800–1848) and his wife, Marie Thérèse Célina Josephine Pilié (1816–ca. 1867), on land purchased from François Gabriel Valcour Aime (1798...

read more

Marston House

pdf iconDownload PDF (209.1 KB)
pp. 103-104

Marston House is located in East Feliciana Parish near the Silliman Institute in Clinton. In 1837 the Union State Bank of New Orleans began construction of a Greek Revival edifice as a branch office on property it had purchased the previous year. Large Ionic capitols atop six monumental columns, gray plaster scored to resemble stone, and galleries at the...

read more

Brame House

pdf iconDownload PDF (197.7 KB)
pp. 105-106

The Brame House, also known as the Brame-Bennett House, is located in Clinton in East Feliciana Parish. Dana D. Davis (d. 1843), a physician from Amite County, Mississippi, and his wife, Lavinia (née Bartlett; b. 1818), purchased two lots on April 8, 1839, for $1,000.02 and began building...

read more

Rienzi Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (168.2 KB)
pp. 107-108

Rienzi Plantation is located in Lafourche Parish, two miles from Thibodaux. Legend holds that Rienzi was built between 1796 and 1810 by a Spanish agent for one of Queen Maria Luisa of Spain’s ladies-in-waiting—or even as a refuge for the queen herself. Its name is said to have...

read more

Ashland/Belle Helene Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (184.9 KB)
pp. 109-110

Counted among the most iconic plantations in Louisiana, Ashland was built between 1839 and 1841 in Ascension Parish, near Geismar. The house was designed for Duncan Farrar Kenner (1813–1887) and Annie Guillemine “Nanine” Kenner (1823–1911), a daughter of Michel Douradou Bringier (1789–1847). James Harrison Dakin (1806– 1852) most likely served as architect...

read more

Madewood Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (253.0 KB)
pp. 111-112

Madewood Plantation is located near Napoleonville in the Bayou Lafourche area of Assumption Parish. Designed by New Orleans architect Henry Howard, the twostory plantation house was built of stuccoed brick between 1840 and 1848 for Colonel Thomas Pugh (1796–1852), who died shortly after its completion. By 1860, the Pugh family owned a total of thirteen...

read more

Ramsey Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (207.3 KB)
pp. 113-114

Ramsey Plantation is located on the bank of False River in Pointe Coupée Parish. The present house was built about 1840, incorporating an earlier structure about which little is known. Indeed, the history of the plantation and details of the building campaigns are obscure. Tebbs’s...

read more

Bagatelle Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (154.5 KB)
pp. 115-116

Bagatelle Plantation was originally built in St. James Parish on property near Donaldsonville. On December 7, 1841, builder Robert Spencer Chadsey (1806–1850) and property owner Augustin Marius Claiborne Tureaud (b. ca. 1810) signed a contract to build the main house. Like...

read more

Uncle Sam Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (221.6 KB)
pp. 117-118

Originally known as Constancia, Uncle Sam Plantation was located near Donaldsonville in St. James Parish. It was built between 1841 and 1843 for Piérre Auguste Samuel Fagot (ca. 1797–1860) and his wife, Emilie Jourdan (b. ca. 1800–ca. 1875). After being damaged by a fire, Constancia was rebuilt in 1849. The main house was constructed of brick fired...

read more

Belle Alliance Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (185.8 KB)
pp. 119-120

Located on Bayou Lafourche, Belle Alliance is one of the few surviving grand plantation houses in Assumption Parish. Like neighboring Madewood, Belle Alliance is a well-preserved testament to the taste for Greek Revival architecture in south Louisiana. Its builder, Charles Anton Kock (1812–1869), had emigrated from Bremen, Germany, in 1830. After working...

read more

Mount Airy Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (238.6 KB)
pp. 121-122

Mount Airy Plantation was located in St. John the Baptist Parish. Joseph LeBourgeois (b. 1824) built a raised Creole cottage in 1850. Local tradition holds that Le- Bourgeois originally called the plantation Monterey, and the name was corrupted over time into “Mount Airy.” It is of note, however, that LeBourgeois attended college in Mount Airy, North Carolina...

read more

Belmont Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (198.6 KB)
pp. 123-124

Belmont Plantation was located in Pointe Coupée Parish, very near the Bayou Maringouin section of the Grosse Tete area in Iberville Parish. Belmont appears to have been begun about 1850 by Willie Macajah Barrow II (1832–1904) and his wife, Martha Jane (née Pilcher; 1835–1923). He...

read more

Angelina Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (199.8 KB)
pp. 125-126

Angelina Plantation was located in St. John the Baptist Parish near Mount Airy, six miles west of Edgard. It was constructed of brick in 1852 by Godfroi Boudousquié (b. 1822), though it may have been begun as early as 1850. A playhouse known as “the dollhouse” mimicked the main house,...

read more

Goodwood Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (225.7 KB)
pp. 127-128

Goodwood Plantation is located in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, near present-day Independence Park. It was built for Dr. Samuel G. Laycock (1811–1884), apparently completed in 1856, on the two-thousand-acre plantation granted to Thomas Hutchings (d. ca. 1800) in 1776...

read more

Belle Grove Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (224.2 KB)
pp. 129-130

Belle Grove Plantation was located near White Castle in Bayou Goula, in Iberville Parish. It was designed by Henry Howard in 1857 for John Andrews (1804–1868), a Virginian who had arrived in New Orleans from Norfolk twenty-four years earlier. Upon the death of his wife, Penelope...

read more

Avery Island Plantation

pdf iconDownload PDF (191.1 KB)
pp. 131-132

Located in Iberia Parish, Avery Island Plantation was built in 1868 by Edmund Mc- Ilhenny (1815–1890), creator of Tabasco hot sauce, after his previous plantation house was destroyed during the Civil War. McIlhenny’s eldest son, John Avery Mc- Ilhenny (1867–1942), briefly managed the plantation after his father’s death before joining Theodore Roosevelt’s...

APPENDIX: The Robert W. Tebbs Collection at the Louisiana State Museum

pdf iconDownload PDF (51.6 KB)
pp. 133-134

NOTES

pdf iconDownload PDF (107.5 KB)
pp. 135-140

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

pdf iconDownload PDF (189.4 KB)
pp. 141-144

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF (690.2 KB)
pp. 145-151


E-ISBN-13: 9780807142196
Print-ISBN-13: 9780807142189

Page Count: 168
Publication Year: 2011