We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Hiroshima Bugi

Atomu 57

Gerald Vizenor

Publication Year: 2003

Hiroshima Bugi is an ingenious kabuki novel that begins in the ruins of the Atomic Bomb Dome, a new Rashomon Gate. Ronin Browne, the humane peace contender, is the hafu orphan son of Okichi, a Japanese boogie-woogie dancer, and Nightbreaker, an Anishinaabe from the White Earth Reservation who served as an interpreter for General Douglas MacArthur during the first year of the American occupation in Japan.
 
Ronin draws on samurai and native traditions to confront the moral burdens and passive notions of nuclear peace celebrated at the Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima. He creates a new calendar that starts with the first use of atomic weapons, Atomu One. Ronin accosts the spirits of the war dead at Yasukuni Jinga. He then marches into the national shrine and shouts to Tojo Hideki and other war criminals to come out and face the spirits of thousands of devoted children who were sacrificed at Hiroshima.
 
In Hiroshima Bugi: Atomu 57 acclaimed Anishinaabe writer Gerald Vizenor has created a dynamic meditation on nuclear devastation and our inability to grasp fully its presence or its legacy

Published by: University of Nebraska Press

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF (21.5 KB)
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (28.0 KB)
pp. vii-

read more

1. Ronin of Rashomon Gate

pdf iconDownload PDF (20.4 KB)
pp. 1-5

The Atomic Bomb Dome is my Rashomon. Come closer to the stone, over here, out of the rain. You are the first person to visit me in these ruins. This is my unearthly haven in the remains of the first nuclear war. Only the dead rush their...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (52.0 KB)
pp. 7-14

Ronin Ainoko Browne beat on my door at the Hotel Manidoo in Nogales, Arizona. There was no cause to answer because the sign in the lobby made it perfectly clear that the residents of the hotel were never at home to strangers...

read more

2. Ronin of the Imperial Moat

pdf iconDownload PDF (23.0 KB)
pp. 15-18

Ronin is my name, as you know, and he has no parents to bear his stories, no memorable contours, creases, or manner of silence at night.My name is wild, a nuclear orphan, a samurai warrior without a master to exact my...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (52.8 KB)
pp. 19-25

Ronin is the invincible samurai of his marvelous stories, the eternal teaser with a vacant smile, a simulated death pose. By his account he has been dead and buried seventeen times in the past decade...

read more

3. Ronin of Sagami Bay

pdf iconDownload PDF (23.3 KB)
pp. 27-32

The sword was mine, a natural, driftwood bounty shaped by steady ocean currents to fit my tiny hands. I raised that sword over my head, slowly turned about to my shadow, and practiced the cuts, thrusts, and blocks...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (43.4 KB)
pp. 33-37

Sumo is a nickname for Miki Sawada, the resolute founder of the Elizabeth Saunders Home. Mifune gave her that name because of the way she rescued orphans and raised money. She was clever, prudent, and steadfast in that sacred ring of tradition...

read more

4. Ronin of the Peace Park

pdf iconDownload PDF (30.7 KB)
pp. 39-47

Atomu 57 on my calendar of fake peace. This is my promissory time, eight fifteen, my gate of giveaway souls , and my rites of passage in the ruins of the Atomic Bomb Dome. Remember the abundant reign of the emperor...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (42.3 KB)
pp. 49-53

Ronin created these stories in Atomu 57. He established an original measure of time in the ruins, an ingenious calendar to count the years since the first simulated nuclear peace, August 6, 1945. The Atomu calendar...

read more

5. Ronin of the Inu Shrine

pdf iconDownload PDF (34.8 KB)
pp. 55-62

Virga was at the peace fires last week,but she never came near me. I watched her circle the pond,an elusive shadow near the monuments. Later,she waited for me at the shrine near the koban, always at escape...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (67.5 KB)
pp. 63-73

Shinto is a native persuasion and an active animistic religion. The participants celebrate nature, honor their ancestors, and, for a time, surrendered to a fascistic emperor. The kami, or the spirits of a vast, eternal nature...

read more

6. Ronin of the Black Rain

pdf iconDownload PDF (38.3 KB)
pp. 75-84

That radiant woman orders an almond kuchen dessert and a pot of green tea every morning. She sits at the same small table near the window, cuts the cake into precise pieces, raises the china teacup with both hands...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (44.1 KB)
pp. 85-89

Ronin is the tricky master of the ruins, the baseborn, hafu ronin of an empire war, the occupation, nuclear memories, and the eternal ghost parades in Hiroshima. He rants about the rain, black rain...

read more

7. Ronin of the Origami Cranes

pdf iconDownload PDF (29.7 KB)
pp. 91-98

Margarito Real and two other men were seated at a table near the window of the restaurant at the Ana Hotel Hiroshima. Real, a feral storier, waved and turned his hands, an oral punctuation and diversion, and with each gesture...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (41.9 KB)
pp. 99-104

Miko is an artist, a kami street shaman, but not a storier. She is a brilliant visionary watercolor painter, as you know, but her stories are lame and mundane. Ronin was so aroused...

read more

8. Ronin of the Invisible Tattoos

pdf iconDownload PDF (34.0 KB)
pp. 105-112

Miko wore a tattoo on the back of her shoulder, a muted morning glory. The choice blue blossom was almost closed, captured late in the day. She turned to show me that tattoo on the park bench, but we were interrupted...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (48.8 KB)
pp. 113-118

Ronin is the tattoo teaser of his own stories, the crucial native creator of aesthetic, erotic pain in the atomu ruins. Horiatomu, his signature as a tattooer, incised a giant, invisible chrysanthemum on the back of a...

read more

9. Ronin of the Ainu Bears

pdf iconDownload PDF (55.6 KB)
pp. 119-132

The Atomic Bomb Dome, as you know, is my Rashomon. My kabuki haven,my kami gate in the ruins. Oshima came out of the rain, the memories of black rain, the waves of atomu poison, and we have lived here since the start...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (59.3 KB)
pp. 133-141

Ronin read the screenplay several times but said he never saw Hiroshima Mon Amour. The only movies he ever talked about were those directed by Akira Kurosawa. Rashomon, of course, and samurai stories were his favorites...

read more

10. Ronin of Yasukuni Jinja

pdf iconDownload PDF (50.5 KB)
pp. 143-155

Sergeant Orion Browne, my father, was an interpreter, as you know, for General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers in Japan. Shortly after the first occupation soldiers arrived my father visited...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (60.2 KB)
pp. 157-166

Ronin is an atomu warrior of the ruins, a roamer of shrines, peace parks, and museums, and, as you know, he is an inspired native contrary. His teases and word cuts are an original kabuki style, and he forever maddens the silky posers, sacred and otherwise...

read more

11. Ronin of the Ginza

pdf iconDownload PDF (33.8 KB)
pp. 167-173

The actual war museum is located east of the main shrine of Yasukuni Jinja. The kaiten, or suicide submarine, is mounted on a pedestal, a merciless memorial to the kamikaze sailors who became human torpedoes. The restored tanks and...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (38.7 KB)
pp. 175-178

Ronin and Bogart became the mobile music men of the Ginza and Hibiya Park. Their unusual union, a bushido veteran with poor vision and the hafu son of an interpreter with the occupation, was reported on television...

read more

12. Ronin of Matsue

pdf iconDownload PDF (52.4 KB)
pp. 179-191

Curry was undercover in my shoulder bag. My loyal envoy wisely remained hidden and silent on the train, although twice he sneezed, clearly not a human sound. I covered my mouth, smiled, and pretended to blow my nose...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (36.8 KB)
pp. 193-196

Matsue is one of the oldest cities in Japan. The city was built on a peninsula, developed a singular, historical culture, and in the eighth century became the capital of Izumo on the Sea of Japan. This new province was later overcome...

read more

13. Ronin of Lafcadio Hearn

pdf iconDownload PDF (33.5 KB)
pp. 197-203

Oshima continued his stories at the museum residence that night. His miseries were overcome by humor and the honor of memorable stories. The chrysanthemums at the leprosarium are his most wretched memories...

read more

Manidoo Envoy

pdf iconDownload PDF (43.4 KB)
pp. 205-208

Ronin is a hafu native speaker of Japanese. He understood a hesitant manner, the hint and tease of the language, but, other than a few common words, he refused to speak Japanese. English is his sense of presence, resistance...


E-ISBN-13: 9780803203471
E-ISBN-10: 0803203470

Publication Year: 2003

Series Title: Native Storiers: A Series of American Narratives

Recommend

UPCC logo

Subject Headings

  • Hiroshima-shi (Japan) -- Fiction.
  • Racially mixed people -- Fiction.
  • Indians of North America -- Fiction.
  • Japanese -- United States -- Fiction.
  • Alienation (Social psychology) -- Fiction.
  • Psychological fiction. -- lcsh.
  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access