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The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals

Bo Beolens, Michael Watkins, and Michael Grayson

Publication Year: 2009

Just who was the Przewalski after whom Przewalski's horse was named? Or Husson, the eponym for the rat Hydromys hussoni? Or the Geoffroy whose name is forever linked to Geoffroy's cat? This unique reference provides a brief look at the real lives behind the scientific and vernacular mammal names one encounters in field guides, textbooks, journal articles, and other scholarly works. Arranged to mirror standard dictionaries, the more than 1,300 entries included here explain the origins of over 2,000 mammal species names. Each bio-sketch lists the scientific and common-language names of all species named after the person, outlines the individual's major contributions to mammalogy and other branches of zoology, and includes brief information about his or her mammalian namesake's distribution. The two appendixes list scientific and common names for ease of reference, and, where appropriate, individual entries include mammals commonly—but mistakenly—believed to be named after people. The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals is a highly readable and informative guide to the people whose names are immortalized in mammal nomenclature.

Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Two of us, Bo Beolens and Mike Watkins, wrote Whose Bird? which was published in November 2003. A review of Whose Bird? was written by Nicholas Gould for the journal International Zoo News. Gould suggested that there could be a need for similar volumes on other animal classes, and among them he suggested mammals. We wish to give credit and thanks here to the person whose suggestion began the ...

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Introduction

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pp. ix-xiii

Much as birders often come across bird names that include the name of a person (such names are properly called “eponyms”), and their curiosity is aroused just as ours was, so will people come across similar eponyms for mammals. We have all heard of Przewalski’s Horse or Thomson’s Gazelle, but how familiar is Nolthenius’ Long-tailed Climbing Mouse or Bannister’s Melomys? This book is for the curious ...

Title Page

E

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pp. 120-130

F

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pp. 131-144

G

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pp. 145-171

H

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pp. 172-202

I

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pp. 203-207

J

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pp. 208-217

K

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pp. 218-232

L

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pp. 233-252

M

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pp. 253-287

N

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pp. 288-295

O

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pp. 296-304

P

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pp. 305-332

R

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pp. 334-354

S

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pp. 355-404

T

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pp. 404-421

U

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pp. 422-423

V

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pp. 424-434

W

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pp. 435-453

Y

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pp. 455-456

Z

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pp. 457-460

Appendix 1: Vernacular Names

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pp. 461-513

Appendix 2: Scientific Names

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pp. 515-567

Bibliography

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pp. 569-574


E-ISBN-13: 9780801895333
E-ISBN-10: 0801895332
Print-ISBN-13: 9780801893049
Print-ISBN-10: 0801893046

Page Count: 592
Publication Year: 2009