We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Archie Mafeje

Scholar, Activist and Thinker

Dani W. Nabudere

Publication Year: 2011

Archie Mafeje was an independent Pan-Africanist and cosmopolitan individual who sought to understand the world at a global level in order to locate Africa within that tapestry. In many ways, Archie Mafeje was one of the African intellectual pathfi nders. He contributed immensely to the African people's search for self-understanding, self-determination and political emancipation as they struggled against alienation and misrepresentation. In recognising the academic and intellectual contribution of Archie Mafeje, this monograph also refl ects on the African people's journey for emancipation in the search for African identity, self-control and self-understanding.

Published by: African Books Collective

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF (991.2 KB)
 

Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF (102.7 KB)
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (39.3 KB)
pp. v-

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (68.4 KB)
pp. 1-2

In many ways, Archie Mafeje was one of the African intellectual pathfinders. He contributed immensely to the African peoples’ search for self-understanding, self-determination and political emancipation as they struggled against alienation and misrepresentation...

read more

Who is Archie Mafeje?

pdf iconDownload PDF (103.5 KB)
pp. 3-6

Archibald Monwabisi Mafeje (or ‘Archie’ as he was fondly referred to) was born in the Eastern Cape, South Africa on 30 March 1936. He died in Pretoria two days before his 71st birthday on 28 March 2007. At the time of his death, Mafeje’s academic...

read more

Mafeje’s ideological and philosophical orientations

pdf iconDownload PDF (125.5 KB)
pp. 7-13

As previously noted, Archie Mafeje was a very independent Pan-Africanist and cosmopolitan individual who sought to understand the world at a global level in order to locate Africa within that tapestry. Kwesi Prah observed that Mafeje’s cosmopolitanism...

read more

The critique of anthropology and alterity

pdf iconDownload PDF (109.3 KB)
pp. 14-18

In examining Mafeje’s contribution to the critique of Anthropology, one must understand his growing sense of identity as an African. One also needs to understand the central concern he had against the particular use of academic disciplines as an external...

read more

The study of rural African society

pdf iconDownload PDF (153.5 KB)
pp. 19-29

Mafeje viewed the issue of rural development as the key to understanding social relations in the countryside and, hence, of developing a basis for understanding the categories and concepts that could be used for analysing the situation. For this and other reasons...

read more

Culture as the ‘missing link’ in African development

pdf iconDownload PDF (137.9 KB)
pp. 30-38

Despite this criticism, Archie Mafeje, like Kwesi Prah, at another level regarded culture as the ‘missing link’ in African development. Culture, argued Mafeje, ‘distinguishes man from brutes’. Culture, he argued, characterises the human species and simultaneously divides it over time...

read more

The issue of ‘social formations’ of African society

pdf iconDownload PDF (162.1 KB)
pp. 39-50

Mafeje provided another picture of African society, which was based on his understanding of the impact of colonial capitalism on African peoples. He argued that ‘anthropologically, one could talk of an African society’ although such a society was no...

read more

Mafeje’s attempts to endogenise and deconstruct knowledge production

pdf iconDownload PDF (115.4 KB)
pp. 51-56

In relation to the above ‘problematic’, which continued to afflict and evade Mafeje’s search for Africanity and endogeneity, let’s explore how Mafeje proposed Africans could get out of the alienation that Western imperialistic ‘othering’ had imposed...

read more

The African post-colonial state and the African elite

pdf iconDownload PDF (151.9 KB)
pp. 57-67

If we interrogated Mafeje further as to how we can endogenise African knowledge production and who would be the agents of such a change, Mafeje would explain that he had a very low opinion of the African postcolonial states and the African petit-bourgeoisie...

read more

Mafeje and African philosophy

pdf iconDownload PDF (140.7 KB)
pp. 68-76

Mafeje approached the issue of African philosophy from a ‘combative’ ontology that Africanity had begun to assume in his analysis of the African situation. Mafeje, like the other African scholars engaged in this discipline, had raised the question that had long been raised...

read more

The Interlacustrine Kingdoms as ‘social formations’

pdf iconDownload PDF (153.9 KB)
pp. 77-87

One of the fundamental reasons why Mafeje agreed with the social anthropologists was that Africa was not a static society but a dynamic one. In the study of the Langa Township, he had observed that the social and economic changes that had been brought...

read more

Mafeje – The South African radical

pdf iconDownload PDF (118.1 KB)
pp. 88-93

We have seen that, in his research in Langa Township and the mission stations in the Transkei, Mafeje had detected a certain class transformation in the South African social landscape. He had observed that ‘Red pagan’ boys at the mission station...

read more

Cosmology, epistemology and academic disciplines

pdf iconDownload PDF (116.6 KB)
pp. 94-99

As we have just seen, Mafeje tried to overcome the limitations of colonial functional Anthropology in order to endogenise knowledge production. Despite his having failed to take up the issue of epistemology seriously, he had still raised the issue of epistemology...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF (72.2 KB)
pp. 100-102

The author was tasked by the Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA) to write a paper to launch a Mafeje Memorial Lecture Series in order to commemorate his academic and intellectual contribution, especially in his struggle to debunk colonial structural functional...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF (84.5 KB)
pp. 103-109

References

pdf iconDownload PDF (94.1 KB)
pp. 110-111

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF (402.7 KB)
 


E-ISBN-13: 9780798303354
Print-ISBN-13: 9780798302869

Page Count: 118
Publication Year: 2011