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Gathering of Reason, The

Second Edition

John Sallis

Publication Year: 2005

This second edition of The Gathering of Reason expands on John Sallis’s classic study of Kant’s First Critique. This study examines the relation of imagination to reason and to human knowledge and action in general. Moving simultaneously at several different hermeneutical levels, Sallis carries out an interpretation of the Transcendental Dialectic of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Although, in contrast to the Analytic, the Dialectic seldom refers explicitly to imagination, Sallis shows that the concept of reason in the Dialectic requires the complicity of imagination. Sallis demonstrates that for Kant, reason alone does not suffice for bringing before our minds the metaphysical ideas of the soul, the world, and God; rather it is through the force of imagination that these ideas are brought forth and made effective. A new preface situates the book in relation to Sallis’s later work, and an extensive afterword focuses on Kant and the Greeks.

Published by: State University of New York Press

Title Page

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Copyright

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Preface to the First Edition

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pp. xi-xii

In this text I trace a way to the issue of imagination. It is intended to be a way around that closure of the issue, which, in play throughout the history of metaphysics, now obtrudes in the utter conflation of the difference that once separated imagination from fancy and in the allied displacement of them, indistinguishably, into an innocuous...

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Preface to the Second Edition

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pp. xiii-xvii

With only the slightest fancy one could envisage this book as a tissue of translations. Most comprehensively it translates Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, not only exposing it to the drift of another language but also reinscribing it in this language in such fashion as to remark the breaks, connections, and openings of the critical discourse. The reinscripted...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Reason—the very word now bespeaks crisis, failure of every available sense to fulfill what cannot but be intended. The crisis is radical, for in every other instance reason would serve as that to which recourse would be had in order to isolate and resolve crisis, in order to open up and appropriate a fulfilling sense. Even to thematize the conceptuality...

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CHAPTER I. INTERPRETIVE HORIZONS

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pp. 13-37

This point marks also the beginning of metaphysics: The division gets retraced through that movement in which, turning away from the immediately present, one comes to have recourse to reason; thereby the division gets established in a certain overtness and the immediately present differentiated, retrospectively, as the...

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CHAPTER II. THE TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC

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pp. 39-61

Let me proceed now to the duplex interpretation of the focal text, the Transcendental Dialectic. To the space of such interpretation belongs the horizon explicit in the text itself; I have thematized this horizon as the problem of metaphysics. Furthermore, the space of such interpretation prescribes that the conceptuality and even the style of the interpretation...

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CHAPTER III. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE PARALOGISMS

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pp. 63-96

Kant’s actual critique of dialectical reason is entirely contained in the second of the two Books into which the Transcendental Dialectic is divided. Everything else is preparatory for the critiques of rational psychology, of rational cosmology, and of rational theology which he carries through in the course of this Book. The actual problematic, the...

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CHAPTER IV. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE ANTINOMIES

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pp. 97-124

The antinomy of pure reason, which constitutes the second type of dialectical inference, is the most significant from a genetic point of view. Indeed, there are grounds for regarding the problem of the antinomies as “the cradle of the critical philosophy”;1 and Kant himself testifies in a letter to Garve that this problem was what awoke him from...

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CHAPTER V. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE IDEAL

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pp. 125-142

The brief introductory section is devoted primarily to explaining what in general is meant by an “ideal.” The crux of the explanation lies in this statement: “By the ideal I understand the idea, not merely in concreto, but in individuo, that is, as an individual thing, determinable or even determined by the idea alone” (A 568/B 596). Here Kant is...

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CHAPTER VI. REASON, IMAGINATION, MADNESS

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pp. 143-155

A new space is now to be prepared: the space of inversion. Eventually, I shall undertake to unleash within this space a play of inverse imaging by which a concealed stratum of the Transcendental Dialectic can be exposed. But, first of all, the phases of the projective interpretation need to be consolidated in such a way as to bring clearly into focus the...

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CHAPTER VII. METAPHYSICAL SECURITY AND THE PLAY OF IMAGINATION

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pp. 157-169

The beginning of metaphysics cannot remain simply intact. On the contrary, the archaic reflection, still only partial, has already adumbrated the issue of crisis, the crisis of metaphysics, of its beginning. For that beginning is marked by that “point at which the common root of our power of knowledge divides and throws out two stems, one of...

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Afterword to the Second Edition: Kant and the Greeks

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pp. 171-179

...this venture brings the entire critical project into communication with a decisive strain in Greek thought; indeed it puts this project in touch with an archaic dimension that begins to be closed off with—or, most certainly, immediately after—Plato and Aristotle. Both the gathering of reason in the broadest sense and the gathering of reason in the narrower sense...

Notes

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pp. 181-194

Index

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pp. 195-197


E-ISBN-13: 9780791483275
Print-ISBN-13: 9780791464533
Print-ISBN-10: 0791464539

Page Count: 215
Publication Year: 2005

Series Title: SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy
Series Editor Byline: Dennis J. Schmidt

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Subject Headings

  • Dialectic.
  • Transcendentalism.
  • Knowledge, Theory of.
  • Reason.
  • Imagination.
  • Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804. Kritik der reinen Vernunft.
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