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Hongzhou School of Chan Buddhism in Eighth- through Tenth-Century China, The

Jinhua Jia

Publication Year: 2006

This book provides a wide-ranging examination of the Hongzhou school of Chan Buddhism—the precursor to Zen Buddhism—under Mazu Daoyi (709–788) and his successors in eighth- through tenth-century China, which was credited with creating a Golden Age or classical tradition. Jinhua Jia uses stele inscriptions and other previously ignored texts to explore the school’s teachings and history. Defending the school as a full-fledged, significant lineage, Jia reconstructs Mazu’s biography and resolves controversies about his disciples. In contrast to the many scholars who either accept or reject the traditional Chan histories and discourse records, she thoroughly examines the Hongzhou literature to differentiate the original, authentic portions from later layers of modification and recreation. The book describes the emergence and maturity of encounter dialogue and analyzes the new doctrines and practices of the school to revise the traditional notion of Mazu and his followers as iconoclasts. It also depicts the strivings of Mazu’s disciples for orthodoxy and how the criticisms of and reflections on Hongzhou doctrine led to the schism of this line and the rise of the Shitou line and various houses during the late Tang and Five Dynasties periods. Jia refutes the traditional Chan genealogy of two lines and five houses and calls for new frameworks in the study of Chan history. An annotated translation of datable discourses of Mazu is also included.

Published by: State University of New York Press

Front Matter

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Contents

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pp. vii-ix

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. xi-xii

TABLES

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pp. xiii-xiv

ABBREVIATIONS AND CONVENTIONS

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pp. xv-

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. 1-10

The Hongzhou school of Chan Buddhism in eighth–tenth century China, with Mazu Daoyi (709–788) and his successors as its central figures, represents a crucial phase in the evolution of Chinese Chan Buddhism. It inherited and creatively developed the abundant legacy of Sinitic Buddhism and the early Chan movement and exerted great infl uence in later developments of Chan...

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1 BIOGRAPHY OF MAZU DAOYI

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pp. 11-20

Mazu Daoyi (709–788), who was acknowledged as the founding patriarch of the Hongzhou school of Chan Buddhism by his successors, is generally regarded as a key figure in Chan tradition. During his eighty years, Mazu witnessed almost all of the important events of the eighth century. His two..

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2 MAZU DAOYI’S DISCIPLES

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pp. 21-46

Mazu Daoyi was a successful teacher with the largest number of disciples whose names are known in the history of Chinese Chan Buddhism. The ZTJ states that Mazu had more than one thousand followers,1 while the SGSZ records a number of more than eight hundred.2 These numbers must have...

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3 EXAMINATION OF THE HONGZHOU SCHOOL LITERATURE

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pp. 47-66

As mentioned at the beginning of this study, modern scholars have presented three stances toward the Chan literature of the eighth to tenth centuries: first, to accept almost all the discourse records and “transmission of the lamp” histories at face value as historical fact; second, to recognize certain fabrications...

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4 CHAN DOCTRINE AND PRACTICE OFTHE HONGZHOU SCHOOL

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pp. 67-82

As discussed in chapter two, Mazu’s ability and commitment as a Buddhist teacher allowed him to attract the largest number of promising young students of Chan Buddhism during the period. After Mazu passed away, those talented disciples began to strive for the orthodoxy of their lineage and finally made...

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5 ROAD TO ORTHODOXY

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pp. 83-106

In the terminology of traditional Chinese military strategy, the formation of the Hongzhou community in the central-southern region during the early post-rebellion period catered to the three ideal conditions—favorable season (tianshi), geographical advantages (dili), and support of the people (renhe). After...

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6 SCHISM OF THE HONGZHOU SCHOOL DURING THE LATE TANG AND FIVE DYNASTIES: DECONSTRUCTING THE TRADITIONAL GENEALOGY OF TWO LINES AND FIVE HOUSES

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pp. 107-118

Since the Song dynasty, all historians of Chan Buddhism have described a genealogical diagram of two lines and five houses after the sixth patriarch Huineng. This genealogical diagram has not only been passed on within the Chan school for more than a thousand years, but also constituted the basic...

Appendix

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pp. 119-130

NOTES

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pp. 131-176

GLOSSARY

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pp. 177-182

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 183-208

INDEX

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pp. 209-220


E-ISBN-13: 9780791481424
Print-ISBN-13: 9780791468234
Print-ISBN-10: 0791468232

Page Count: 236
Publication Year: 2006