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Aboriginal Canada Revisited

edited by Kerstin Knopf

Publication Year: 2008

Exploring a variety of topics—including health, politics, education, art, literature, media, and film—Aboriginal Canada Revisited draws a portrait of the current political and cultural position of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. While lauding improvements made in the past decades, the contributors draw attention to the systemic problems that continue to marginalize Aboriginal people within Canadian society. From the Introduction: “[This collection helps] to highlight areas where the colonial legacy still takes its toll, to acknowledge the manifold ways of Aboriginal cultural expression, and to demonstrate where Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people are starting to find common ground.” Contributors include Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal scholars from Europe and Canada, including Marlene Atleo, University of Manitoba; Mansell Griffin, Nisga’a Village of Gitwinksihlkw, British Columbia; Robert Harding, University College of the Fraser Valley; Tricia Logan, University of Manitoba; Steffi Retzlaff, McMaster University; Siobhán Smith, University of British Columbia; Barbara Walberg, Confederation College.

Published by: University of Ottawa Press

CONTENTS

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pp. vii-ix

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PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. x-xii

This collection of essays contains the proceedings from the third Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies Symposium entitled "Aboriginal Peoples in Canada in the 21st Century" and held in April 2005 at the University of Greifswald in Germany. The conference was dedicated to Professor Dr. Hartmut Lutz as a "present" to commemorate his sixtieth birthday.

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INTRODUCTION: ABORIGINAL CANADA REVISITED

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pp. 2-27

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, it has been more than five hundred years since the "discovery" and beginning of the European conquest of North America—the "new world." The term new world itself betrays the European ideological framework of the late 15th and 16th century that included the desire to explore another "new" non-European world, the divine and political right to the conquest and domination thereof, ...

HEALTH, SOCIAL ISSUES, POLITICS

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DE-COLONIZING CANADIAN ABORIGINAL HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES FROM THE INSIDE OUT: A CASE STUDY-THE AHOUSAHT HOLISTIC SOCIETY

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pp. 30-49

The colonization of Aboriginal bodies and life-worlds has been a long-term assimilation project that began legislatively with the British North America Act (BNA Act) of 1867—to which the Indian nations whose inherent rights had been recognized in the Royal Proclamation of 1763 were not party (Morse 1999,16-19). Subsequent to the BNA Act, the new settler government in 1876 drafted the Indian Act, which ...

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THE COMMISSION ON THE FUTURE OF HEALTH CARE IN CANADA: A CASE STUDY OF ABORIGINAL HEALTH

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pp. 50-71

Since the beginning of the 1980s; Canadian lawmakers have come under increasing pressure to reform the country's national health-care system. Because many Canadians greatly value their medicare system, it has been very difficult for them to agree on a way of instituting structural reforms. As such, in 2001 the federal government appointed Roy Romanow to head the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada (hereafter CFHCC). Romanow was asked to study the medicare system and recommend ways in which it could be improved.

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THE NISGA'A COMMON BOWL IN TRADITION AND POLITICS

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pp. 72-85

In the year 1887; a delegation of Nisga'a travelled by canoe and steamboat to Victoria in order to discuss their land question with the governor of British Columbia. The length of that journey must have seemed immense to the Nisga'a back then, but it was nothing compared to the time they would need in order to get an answer to that question. In 1913 they brought it before His Majesty's Privy Council in London, but it was not until 2000 that they finally achieved what no other First Nation in a Canadian province had ...

EDUCATION

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M

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pp. 88-99

M

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RESPONDING TO THE NEEDS OF POST-SECONDARY ABORIGINAL EDUCATION: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

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pp. 100-119

Aboriginal peoples1 in Canada are presently engaged in a process of decolonization, in the restructuring of their societies through self-government and in the reaffirmation of their knowledge and worldview within the discourse of mainstream society. Central to this project is the need to reform the formal post-secondary education system in a way that will address these goals and aspirations. This reform must contemplate the possibility of a two-way exchange of knowledge, whereby Indigenous ...

IMAGINING AND IMAGING THE "INDIAN"

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THE IMAGINARY INDIAN IN GERMAN CHILDREN'S NON-FICTION LITERATURE

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pp. 122-156

The stereotypical image of Native people among German children and young adults is that of the Plains Indian. The Indian is a mounted warrior and buffalo hunter, who rides through the endless prairies, wearing war paint and a headdress, dwells in a tipi, and sits around the campfire in a dignified manner, smoking a peace pipe. Even small children have a firm picture of an Indian and instantly recognize the stylized mounted chief in fringed buckskin as Karl May's "Winnetou" and the Indian girl with long ...

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THE ART OF EXCLUSION: THE STATUS OF ABORIGINAL ART IN THE McMICHAEL CANADIAN ART COLLECTION

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pp. 158-194

Since 1927, with the National Gallery of Canada's colonialist exhibition titled Exhibition of Canadian West Coast Art, Native and Modern, Canadian public art galleries have been grappling (often unsuccessfully) with how Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian artworks should come together to define Canadian art.2 In spite of more than two decades of effort by Aboriginal artists and curators to create change, Aboriginal art in Canada still occupies a peripheral place in mainstream Canadian art histories and galleries.

LITERATURE

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"DECOLONIZING THE MIND": DREW HAYDEN TAYLOR'S PLAY WITH THE SEMANTICS OF IRONY IN ONLY DRUNKS AND CHILDREN TELL THE TRUTH

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pp. 198-219

Approaches toward Native (Canadian) texts often ask the ones accessing these texts to become conscious of their own cultural background. Broadly speaking, as a European, or German for that matter, one is ultimately influenced by Western concepts of thinking. These concepts, often "hampered by the irrational and stifling legacies of colonialism and eurocentrism" (Lutz 2002, 1), thus have an enormous impact on approaches to Native Canadian texts. While one's approaches, especially to ...

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HUMOROUS RESTORIFICATIONS: REWRITING HISTORY WITH HEALING LAUGHTER

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pp. 220-245

Monroe decides to put "the Indians back into the painting" (133) and starts to restore other paintings in like manner, eventually getting himself fired: "I don't think they wanted their Indians restored.... I think they liked their Indians where they couldn't see them" (247). King's metaphorical use of painting in Truth and Bright Water in many ways mimics the politics of Western historiography: mainstream North America has indeed tended to blot out or gloss over important aspects of its history has put its "Indians" ...

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MODERNIZING THE "INDIAN": LITERARY CONSTRUCTIONS OF THE NATIVE IN SELECTED NOVELS BY THOMAS KING

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pp. 246-269

If we take the reports by European explorers to the present territory of Canada, written in the 16th century, as the beginning of written Canadian Literature, this makes for a literary history of about four centuries, give or take a few years. The Native inhabitants of Canada have always been an integral part of this literary history: it is obvious that they were one of the main objects of the explorers' reports; it is also obvious that the "newly discovered" people quickly became a topic for Canadian poetry and prose, and also for Canadian ...

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REFLECTIONS OF ORAL TRADITIONS IN CONTEMPORARY NATIVE WRITING: RUBY SLIPPERJACK'S HONOUR THE SUN

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pp. 270-286

Storytelling long predates the arrival of the Europeans in North America, and it has always accompanied the lives of Native peoples as it anchors memories, links generations, places, as well as times. In traditional societies, stories form perhaps the most important available model of instruction. The purpose of telling them is "to integrate, to educate, and to entertain all the peoples. The children and the adults of the human, animal, and mythic peoples all depend on the telling of the myths and tales, for within the stories are what is essential ...

PRINT MEDIA AND FILM

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ABORIGINAL CHILD WELFARE: SYMBOLIC BATTLEGROUND IN THE NEWS MEDIA

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pp. 290-328

Over the last three decades, dozens of First Nations have negotiated the devolution of delegated responsibility for child welfare, and many more are in the process of negotiating such agreements. A study conducted in 2004, found that daily newspapers in British Columbia report on Aboriginal management of child welfare services in ways that undermine their aspirations to design and deliver culturally appropriate services to their people. Control over child welfare may be seen as a symbolic ...

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'THE ELDERS HAVE SAID' - PROJECTING ABORIGINAL CULTURAL VALUES INTO CONTEMPORARY NEWS DISCOURSE

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pp. 330-359

In recent years, it has become obvious that Aboriginal people in Canada are growing stronger in their assertiveness as "nations within" as distinct peoples with a right to self-determination, land and resources, and treaty concessions. The evolving status of Aboriginal people is mediated through a powerful discourse that challenges the existing paradigm. This discourse in the media can be analyzed using various linguistic concepts and models. This article examines how Aboriginal people in Canada represent themselves ...

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"STOLEN SISTERS": DISCRIMINATION AND VIOLENCE AGAINST ABORIGINAL WOMEN AS REPRESENTED IN CANADIAN FILMS

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pp. 360-395

The 2004 Amnesty International report "Stolen Sisters—A Human Rights Response to Discrimination and Violence against Aboriginal Women in Canada" is a shocking account of cases of horrific sexist violence against Aboriginal women in Canada; violence fostered by racism and discrimination, as well as the systemic social and economic marginalization of a majority of this group. This "human rights tragedy" as Alex Neve, secretary general of Amnesty International Canada, terms it (Neve, online), ...

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

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pp. 396-400

INDEX

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pp. 402-422


E-ISBN-13: 9780776617763
E-ISBN-10: 0776617761
Print-ISBN-13: 9780776606798
Print-ISBN-10: 0776606794

Page Count: 436
Publication Year: 2008

Series Title: International Canadian Studies Series

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