We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR
title

Wildflowers of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes Region

A Comprehensive Field Guide

Merel R. Black and Emmet J. Judziewicz

Publication Year: 2009

Describing more than 1,100 species, this is a comprehensive guide to wildflowers in Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Ontario. A new introduction to this second edition discusses wildflowers in the context of their natural communities. Packed with detailed information, this field guide is compact enough to be handy for outdoors lovers of all kinds, from novice naturalists to professional botanists. It includes:

• more than 1,100 species from 459 genera in 100 families
• many rare and previously overlooked species
• 2,100 color photographs and 300 drawings
• Wisconsin distribution maps for almost all plants
• brief descriptions including distinguishing characteristics of the species
• Wisconsin status levels for each species of wildflower (native, invasive, endangered, etc.)
• derivation of Latin names.

Published by: University of Wisconsin Press

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF (81.8 KB)
pp. vii-

Scientific Names of Families

pdf iconDownload PDF (82.7 KB)
pp. viii-

Common Names of Families

pdf iconDownload PDF (83.0 KB)
pp. ix-

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF (113.6 KB)
pp. x-

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (114.9 KB)
pp. xi-

Our wildflower heritage is one of the glories of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes Region. Most of our wildflowers are widely distributed, so this book also covers the vast majority of species encountered in Minnesota, Michigan, northern Iowa, northern Illinois, northern Indiana, and parts of southern Ontario Wildflowers of Wisconsin and the Great Lakes Region presents...

read more

Wisconsin Natural Communities: A Brief Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF (973.3 KB)
pp. xii-xxxiii

The natural communities of Wisconsin have been well studied, beginning with the pioneering research of John T. Curtis and his students at the University of Wisconsin in the 1940s and 1950s. The resulting The Vegetation of Wisconsin (Curtis, 1959, republished in 1971) is still regarded as a classic and one of the best summaries of the vegetation of any state. The summary classification presented here uses the Curtis framework but simplifies his...

read more

Identification Method

pdf iconDownload PDF (116.0 KB)
pp. xxxiv-

We have chosen to organize the wildflowers in this book by plant family rather than flower color. Many wildflower species have multiple flower colors, making the use of this character problematic. All plants within a particular family exhibit certain common traits. When you have...

Understanding the Plant Descriptions

pdf iconDownload PDF (143.0 KB)
pp. xxxv-

Pictorial Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF (140.1 KB)
pp. xxxiv-

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF (133.3 KB)
pp. xxxvii-xix

read more

Identification Guides

pdf iconDownload PDF (159.2 KB)
pp. 1-7

NOTE: Families follow the order of these keys except for those whose page number is in parentheses; these families are in another section but have one or more species with these traits. Parts refer to the obvious or showy parts of the flower including the sepals and/or petals, but sometimes parts also include the bracts or upper leaves...

Plant Details:

pdf iconDownload PDF (195.7 KB)
pp. 8-229

read more

3 or 6 Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (2.2 MB)
pp. 8-44

Hollow stems to 12’ tall. Brownish, tiny flowers (3-parted) on a densely-crowded, terminal, sausage-like spike with male flowers at the top above the female flowers. Sword- or lance-like leaves with parallel veins, D-shaped in cross section. Found in wet places. Our 2 species hybridize...

read more

4 Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.7 MB)
pp. 45-68

Leaves alternate, compound and dissected, without stipules. Watery, bitter juice. Flowers seemingly irregular with 4 petals in 2 pairs with a spur or hood on 1 or both of the outer pairs. 6 stamens, 1 pistil, 2 sepals.

read more

5 United Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.2 MB)
pp. 69-118

Root-parasitic plants usually pale-colored, low, fleshy, and mostly with scale-like leaves. Asymmetric flowers with either 5 united petals forming a tube or 2 lipped; 2 sepals, 2 pairs of stamens, 1 style, and 1 stigma.

read more

5 Separated Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.7 MB)
pp. 119-181

Leaves alternate, with stipules, simple or once compound. Flowers irregular, usually 5 petals; standard the larger upper petal, clawed wings the 2 side petals, and lower 2 petals (which are usually fused) are the keel. 1 simple pistil, which becomes the fruit...

read more

7 or More Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (3.1 MB)
pp. 182-228

Alternate, simple, entire, pinnately-veined leaves without stipules. Large multi-branched plants. Flowers on long, spike-like raceme opposite the leaves, producing flat, dark-purple berries on a red stem. 4-5 sepals...

read more

Tiny Parts

pdf iconDownload PDF (1.6 MB)
pp. 229-252

Aquatic or semi-aquatic herbs with opposite, rounded to linear leaves. Usually 1, 2, or 3 flowers together in the axil of a leaf. Seeds 4-parted and pendulous. No petals or sepals....

Wisconsin Counties

pdf iconDownload PDF (116.5 KB)
pp. 255-

Photography Credits

pdf iconDownload PDF (120.0 KB)
pp. 256-258

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF (119.7 KB)
pp. 259-260

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF (183.6 KB)
pp. 261-275


E-ISBN-13: 9780299230531
Print-ISBN-13: 9780299230548

Publication Year: 2009