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Feeding the Russian Fur Trade

Provisionment of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula, 1639–1856

James R. Gibson

Publication Year: 2011

James R. Gibson offers a detailed study that is both an account of this chapter of Russian history and a full examination of the changing geography of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula over the course of two centuries.

Published by: University of Wisconsin Press

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xix

The importance that Klyuchevsky, one of nineteenth-century Russia's foremost historians, attributed to Russian expansion when he called the history of Russia "the history of a . . .

PART I. Perspective and Context

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1 Historical Background: Occupation and Exploitation of the Russian Far East

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pp. 3-33

It is sometimes forgotten that European colonial expansion proceeded overland to the east as well as overseas to the west. While the maritime nations of Western Europe were advancing westward . . .

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2 Geographical Background: Physical and Cultural Setting of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula

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pp. 34-45

We have seen that the problem of provisionment of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula was largely a problem of the fur trade, which was the basis of Russian eastward . . .

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3 The Problem of Provisionment

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pp. 46-56

The problem of food supply on the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula was not a new experience for Sibiryaks (Russians of Siberia). Provisionment was long a chronic problem . . .

PART II. Overland-Oversea Provisionment

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4 Introduction

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pp. 59-71

The principal response of the Russians to the food supply problem of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula was overland (Irkutsk-Y akutsk-Okhotsk) -oversea (Okhotsk-Gizhiga-Kamchatka) provisionment. * At times this approach . . .

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5 Routes and Carriers

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pp. 72-104

At first mainly from Ilimsk Uyezd and later mostly from Baikalia provisions (chiefly flour and groats) were floated down the Lena River to Yakutsk from the "upper Lena . . .

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6 Performance

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pp. 105-112

Despite the incompleteness of statistical data, enough figures are available to indicate that large amounts of provisions were transported overland-oversea from Eastern Siberia to the Okhotsk . . .

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7 Transport Problems

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pp. 113-140

A plethora of difficulties plagued overland-overseas provisionment. Downstream transport on the Lena River was faced with fewer obstacles than transport on the Yakutsk-Okhotsk Track and on . . .

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8 Reactions

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pp. 141-152

Difficulties such as we have glimpsed prompted officials and merchants to seek various remedies, primarily alternate routes between Yakutsk and the Okhotsk Seaboard and alternate sites for . . .

PART III. Local Agriculture

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9 Introduction

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pp. 155-159

The many difficulties impeding overland-oversea provisionment of the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula prompted the Russian Government in the second quarter of the . . .

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10 Agricultural Settlement

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pp. 160-170

The introduction of agriculture On the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula, then, was prompted by the extraordinary difficulties of overland-oversea provisionment. The . . .

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11 Production

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pp. 171-184

Members of the Second Kamchatka Expedition, such as Chirikov, Steller, and Krasheninnikov, were instructed to investigate the agricultural potential of Okhotsk-Kamchatka Kray . . .

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12 Agricultural Problems

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pp. 185-201

Most of the numerous obstacles which limited agricultural production on the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula stemmed from the region's harsh physical . . .

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13 Reactions

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pp. 202-215

Russian reactions to the disappointing performance of agriculture on the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula are well documented for the peninsula, which was the focus of the . . .

PART IV. Retrospect

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14 Summary and Conclusion

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pp. 219-226

The Russians came to the Okhotsk Seaboard and the Kamchatka Peninsula in search of furs, just as they had originally entered Siberia for sables and ultimately reached Alaska for sea , , ,

Notes

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pp. 229-284

Bibliography

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pp. 285-310

Index

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pp. 311-337


E-ISBN-13: 9780299052331
Print-ISBN-13: 9780299052348

Page Count: 358
Publication Year: 2011

Edition: 1st paperback

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Subject Headings

  • Food supply -- Okhotsk, Sea of, Region.
  • Food supply -- Russia (Federation) -- Kamchatka Peninsula.
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