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Escape from Blood Pond Hell

The Tales of Mulian and Woman Huang

Beata Grant

Publication Year: 2012

Translations of two late-19th-century Chinese scrolls featuring popular religious literature in alternating verse and prose designed to both entertain and instruct. Graphic portrayals of the underworld; dramatization of popular Buddhist beliefs about death, salvation, and rebirth; and frank discussions of the demands of filial piety as well as women's perceived responsibility for sin will intrigue a contemporary audience.

Published by: University of Washington Press

Cover

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p. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 2-5

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

When we were working on our first coauthored publication, The Red Brush: Writing Women in Imperial China, we were struck by how many of our women authors turned out to have been pious Buddhists even though they grew up and lived their lives in families that otherwise were staunchly Confucian. ...

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Note on the Translations

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pp. ix-x

Our primary aim has been to provide translations that are both faithful to the original and easy to read, which is why we have kept our annotations to the minimum. More detailed and more expert discussions of many of the issues and figures mentioned in the texts may be found in selected items in the bibliography. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-34

Each of the two texts translated in this volume, The Precious Scroll of the Three Lives of Mulian (Mulian sanshi baojuan) and Woman Huang Recites the Diamond Sutra (Huangshi nü dui Jingang),1 represents only one of numerous versions of a religious story that once enjoyed tremendous popularity all over China and is occasionally read and performed even today. ...

The Precious Scroll of the Three Lives of Mulian

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Part 1

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pp. 37-113

Once upon a time there lived, in Guanxi of Nandu, a certain gentleman Fu Xiang, whose personal name was Yuanwai.1 From his earliest days he had practiced self-cultivation. His wedded wife, who was called Liu Qingti, had not yet borne him a child. Fu Xiang practiced goodness and kept the fast;2 he read the sutras and recited the name of the Buddha. ...

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Part 2

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pp. 114-123

The story goes that in Red Wall Village of Zhangju County of Chaozhou in the World of Light, there lived a salt merchant by the name of Huang Zongdan.116 His wife was Madame Tian, who had not yet borne him any child. Because the couple had no children, Zongdan had promised banners and parasols to every temple, ...

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Part 3

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pp. 124-146

The story goes that in the city of Chang’an,134 by the East Gate, there was a He Family Lane. Mr. He’s personal name was Xiang, and his wife was Madame Xiao. Having no other skill or craft, He Xiang made his living as a butcher. His wife was pregnant, and after having been heavy with child for nine months, she gave birth to a boy. ...

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Woman Huang Recites the Diamond Sutra

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pp. 147-230

When Woman Huang recites the Diamond Sutra, The sound of her wooden fish rattles the hells. An admiring Lord of Darkness invites Woman Huang To the hells, where she laments the fate of the multitudes. Reciting the Diamond Sutra, the buddhas offer protection; She is transformed into a man, reborn to become an official. ...

Notes

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pp. 231-258

Glossary of Chinese Characters

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pp. 259-267

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 268-278

Back Cover

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p. 290-290


E-ISBN-13: 9780295801766
E-ISBN-10: 029580176X
Print-ISBN-13: 9780295991207
Print-ISBN-10: 0295991194

Publication Year: 2012