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Beaten Down

A History of Interpersonal Violence in the West

by David Peterson del Mar

Publication Year: 2002

Published by: University of Washington Press

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

It is a pleasure to thank the many people who helped prepare this book for publication. I was fortunate to enjoy the services of excellent research assistants: Riley Adams, Connie Barnes, Chris Beach, Melanie BuddIe, Bonnie Cernak, Claudette Gouger, Kurt Nordstokke, and especially Mia Reimers. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-12

Every other Friday, one by one, we filed forward, bent over, and took our medicine: one or more "hacks" from a wooden paddle. It was the late 1960s at Lewis and Clark Consolidated, and the students who had been bad were suffering for it. Our teachers, paying homage to a cultural revolution that had filtered down ...

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1. A White Fist on Their Noses: Colonization and Violence

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pp. 13-45

Around 1900 an elderly Kwakiutl told a local Indian agent that his people had been "living in a state of warfare" for countless generations. Then the white people arrived and brought peace.1 Colonizers have of course been eager to hear and construct this sort of history. The belief that conquest constituted a civilizing process ...

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2. To Take Your Own Part: Violence among the Settlers

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pp. 46-68

On 13 February 1834 William Fraser Tolmie, a Hudson's Bay Company physician, attacked one Charbonneau, a "rascally Canadian noted for laziness & dishonesty" who had been engaging in lewd conduct behind the doctor's house. Tolmie "thought it right to make an example of him to the others & accordingly" planted ...

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3. I Was Not There to Fight: The Decline and Persistence of Violence in the Late Nineteenth Century

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pp. 69-91

John Person was not, he assured the court, a fighting man. The railroad laborer claimed that John Daly had committed an unprovoked and unwarranted assault upon him in the Kootenays of British Columbia in 1895. His version of the altercation began when Daly remarked that "if that big Swede s. o. b. wants something, ...

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4. Plucky Women and Crazed Italians: Representing Violence and Marginality in Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver

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pp. 92-111

Early in 1905 a Seattle newspaper reported the victory of "sunny Italy ... over darkest Africa." The contest occurred not on the field of battle, but on a train bound from Portland to Seattle. It began not with a volley of rifle fire, but when a "big colored porter" asked Mr. and Mrs. Kranberg for their tickets. ...

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5. To Do Just as He Pleased: Violence in the 1920s

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pp. 112-135

Young Ruth Jones had never seen anything like it. As she lay watching in the shadows of an eastern Oregon orchard, Sam Delaney, a cowboy, confronted the charming LeVeq. LeVeq threatened Delaney; Delaney called his bluff. The two turned to each other, "stripped of their birthrights of centuries and eons-as in an earlier ...

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6. Big as God Almighty and Undemanding as Dew: Violence and People of African and Japanese Descent

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pp. 136-164

It looked as if Sandy Moses would have to move from his Seattle house in the late 1930s. The Ku Klux Klan had been driving out other African Americans in his neighborhood by burning crosses in front of their homes. A woman stopped by to ask if he was ready to sell. Moses brought out his rifle. Then he said, ...

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Epilogue: Discovering Violence

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pp. 165-180

One late summer's night in 1993 two young African Americans brutally beat a white man outside the Lloyd Center mall as his horrified fiancee looked on. The event was highly unusual. Blacks typically reserved their violence for each other, and they were much more likely to be victims than perpetrators of hate crimes. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. 181-182

Notes

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pp. 183-284

Selected Bibliography of Secondary Sources

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pp. 285-288

Index

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pp. 289-300


E-ISBN-13: 9780295800455
E-ISBN-10: 0295800453
Print-ISBN-13: 9780295985053
Print-ISBN-10: 0295985054

Publication Year: 2002