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Demosthenes, Speeches 1-17

Translated by Jeremy Trevett

Publication Year: 2011

Published by: University of Texas Press

Title Page, Copyright, Dedicatiaon

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CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

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SERIES EDITOR’S PREFACE

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pp. ix-

This is the fourteenth volume in a series of translations of The Oratory of Classical Greece. The aim of the series is to make available primarily for those who do not read Greek up-to-date, accurate, and readable translations with introductions and explanatory...

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TRANSLATOR’S PREFACE

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pp. xi-

I should like to thank Alan Boegehold, who read the manuscript for the Press and made a number of helpful suggestions; Jim Burr and Lynne Chapman of the University of Texas Press, and Nancy Moore, my copy editor, for their extremely professional editorial...

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SERIES INTRODUCTION

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pp. xiii-xxxii

From as early as Homer (and undoubtedly much earlier) the Greeks placed a high value on effective speaking. Even Achilles, whose greatness was primarily established on the battlefield, was brought up to be “a speaker of words and a doer of deeds”...

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INTRODUCTION TO DEMOSTHENES

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pp. 1-5

Since antiquity Demosthenes (384–322 BC) has usually been judged the greatest of the Attic orators. Although the patriotic and nationalistic tenor of his message has been more highly regarded in some periods of history than in others, he is unique in...

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INTRODUCTION TO THIS VOLUME

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pp. 6-26

This volume contains translations of all the surviving deliberative speeches of Demosthenes, including several whose authenticity has been questioned (Dem. 7, 10, 11, 13, 17), as well as the text of a letter of Philip of Macedon to the Athenians (Dem. 12)...

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1. FIRST OLYNTHIAC

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pp. 27-40

Olynthus was a city in the Chalcidic peninsula and the head of the Chalcidic League, the only significant Greek power in the north Aegean.¹ The league had made an alliance with Philip of Macedon in 357, when he off ered to recover for them the nearby...

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2. SECOND OLYNTHIAC

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pp. 41-52

Th is speech was delivered in 349/8 (see the Introduction to Dem. 1– 3), apparently before the Athenians had sent any assistance to Olynthus, since at 12 Demosthenes calls for them to take action. As in the First Olynthiac, he represents the Olynthian appeal...

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3. THIRD OLYNTHIAC

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pp. 53-67

This is probably the third in order of writing of the three speeches that Demosthenes delivered in 349/8, arguing that Athens should send help to the northern Greek city of Olynthus, which was under attack from Philip of Macedon (see the Introduction to Dem. 1– 3)....

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4. FIRST PHILIPPIC

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pp. 68-87

The First Philippic marks a turning point in Demosthenes’ political career: although he had made a glancing reference to Philip in an (arguably) earlier speech (15.24), this is the first speech in which he directly addresses the danger to Athens arising from the...

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5. ON THE PEACE

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pp. 88-99

Demosthenes’ speech On the Peace was delivered in the aftermath of the making of the Peace of Philocrates between Athens and Philip in summer 346.¹ It is correctly dated 346/5 by Dionysius of Halicarnassus² and was probably delivered in autumn 346....

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6. SECOND PHILIPPIC

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pp. 100-112

The Second Philippic is dated to 344/3, according to Dionysius of Halicarnassus, who adds the information that it was delivered in reply to an embassy “from the Peloponnese.”¹ This was a year of important diplomatic activity for Athens. First, the Persian King sent ambassadors to the city, as well as to others, asking...

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7. ON HALONNESUS

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pp. 113-128

The authorship of the speech On Halonnesus was debated in antiquity. Dionysius of Halicarnassus accepts it as the work of Demosthenes without discussion,¹ but Libanius denies this attribution on the ground that some of its vocabulary is too vulgar to...

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8. ON THE CHERSONESE

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pp. 129-151

This speech, which is dated 342/1 by Dionysius of Halicarnassus, was delivered in spring 341.¹ Demosthenes’ statement in it that Philip has been campaigning in Thrace for ten months (2) is consistent with this date, assuming that he started his campaign...

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9. THIRD PHILIPPIC

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pp. 152-176

The Third Philippic was delivered in spring 341, at about the same time as Dem. 8.¹ Certainly the two speeches paint a similar picture of the situation in Thrace and the Chersonese. In the present speech, Demosthenes claims that Philip has set out against...

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10. FOURTH PHILIPPIC

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pp. 177-200

The authenticity of the Fourth Philippic has in the past been denied, but it is now generally accepted as a genuine speech of Demosthenes. Scholars in antiquity expressed no doubts on this score: Dionysius of Halicarnassus treats it as genuine,¹ and Libanius...

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11. RESPONSE TO THE LETTER OF PHILIP

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pp. 201-210

The authenticity of this short speech¹ is open to doubt, and the majority opinion among scholars is that it is spurious, even though ancient critics generally accepted it as genuine.² Dionysius of Halicarnassus regards it as authentic, “the last of the speeches...

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12. LETTER OF PHILIP

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pp. 211-223

The Letter of Philip to the Athenians, whether genuine or not, clearly does not properly belong in a collection of Demosthenes’ deliberative speeches, but ancient editors presumably included it because they believed (perhaps correctly) that it was the letter to...

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13. ON ORGANIZATION

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pp. 224-239

The date and authorship of this speech are both disputed. It was accepted as genuine both by Libanius in his Introduction to it and by Didymus, who included it in his commentary on the deliberative speeches of Demosthenes (cols. 13.14– 15.10). It is, however...

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14. ON THE SYMMORIES

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pp. 240-256

On the Symmories is the earliest surviving deliberative speech of Demosthenes. It is dated 354/3 by Dionysius of Halicarnassus, and this date has been generally accepted.¹ According to Libanius’ Introduction, the occasion of the speech was a rumor that the Persian King was planning to attack Greece. Apparently some...

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15. ON THE FREEDOM OF THE RHODIANS

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pp. 257-273

The date of this speech is open to some doubt. Dionysius of Halicarnassus places it in 351/0, although we do not know how he or his source arrived at this date.¹ It was clearly delivered after the death of Mausolus, ruler of Caria, and during the rule of his sister...

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16. FOR THE MEGALOPOLITANS

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pp. 274-285

Dionysius of Halicarnassus states that this speech was delivered in 353/2.¹ This date is consistent with the recording by the historian Diodorus Siculus (16.39) of a Spartan attack on Megalopolis in the following year, 352/1, although Diodorus’ chronology...

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17. ON THE AGREEMENT WITH ALEXANDER

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pp. 286-300

This speech is certainly later than any of the other speeches in this volume, since it belongs to the reign of Philip’s son Alexander. After the defeat of an anti-Macedonian Greek coalition, led by Athens and Thebes, at the battle of Chaeronea in 338,...

BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR THIS VOLUME

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pp. 301-307

INDEX

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pp. 309-318


E-ISBN-13: 9780292735507
E-ISBN-10: 0292735502
Print-ISBN-13: 9780292726772
Print-ISBN-10: 0292726775

Publication Year: 2011

Series Title: Oratory of Classical Greece

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Subject Headings

  • Speeches, addresses, etc., Greek -- Translations into English.
  • Athens (Greece) -- Politics and government -- Early works to 1800.
  • Demosthenes -- Translations into English.
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