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Ruling Passions

Political Economy in Nineteenth-Century America

Edited by Richard R. John

Publication Year: 2006

In recent years, the Journal of Policy History has emerged as a major venue for scholarship on American policy history in the period after 1900. Indeed, it is for this reason that it is often praised as the leading outlet for scholarship on American political history in the world. Only occasionally, however, has it featured essays on the early republic, the Civil War, or the post–Civil War era. And when it has, the essays have often focused on partisan electioneering rather than on governmental institutions. The rationale for this special issue of the Journal of Policy History is to expand the intellectual agenda of policy history backward in time, so as to embrace more fully the history of governmental institutions in the period before 1900. The six essays in this volume contain much that will be new even for specialists in nineteenth-century American policy history, yet they are written in a style that is intended to be accessible to college undergraduates and historians unfamiliar with the period.

Published by: Penn State University Press

Front Cover

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Copyright Page

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pp. iv-

Contents

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pp. v-

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Ruling Passions: Political Economy in Nineteenth-Century America

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pp. 1-20

In recent years, the Journal of Policy History has emerged as a major venue for scholarship on American policy history in the period after 1900. Indeed, it is for this reason that it is often praised as the leading outlet for scholarship on American political history in the world. Only occasionally, however, has it featured essays on the early republic, the Civil ...

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Institutional Reality in the Age of Slavery: Taxation and Democracy in the States

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pp. 21-43

On August 13, 1782, Alexander Hamilton complained to Robert Morris about the deplorable condition of politics in the state of New York, and especially the condition of taxation. Morris had appointed Hamilton as receiver of continental taxes for New York, meaning that Hamilton was in charge of collecting New York’s share of the “requisitions” of Congress. ...

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The Politics of Procurement: Military Origins of Bureaucratic Autonomy

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pp. 44-73

No U.S. history textbook mentions Robert Allen, George H. Crosman, John H. Dickerson, Thomas Swords, or Stewart Van Vliet. Yet in certain respects they were five of the most important government officials in the nineteenth-century United States. Each was a high-ranking officer in the Quartermaster’s Department, a bureau of the U.S. army entrusted with ...

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Promotion, Competition, Captivity: The Political Economy of Coal

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pp. 74-95

So proclaimed the president of Pennsylvania’s Pequa Railroad and Improvement Company in 1849. The importance of coal, the official explained, lay in its utility as an energy source, for which he hailed it as unsurpassed: coal was “’hoarded labor’”—a “treasure reserved by nature to promote and perfect ...

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Patent Politics: Intellectual Property, the Railroad Industry, and the Problem of Monopoly

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pp. 196-125

As winter descended on Washington in December 1878, the Forty-fifth Congress gathered for what promised to be a hectic third and final session. Emotions ran high. In this era, Congress habitually reserved much of its business for these brief, intense “lame duck” sessions that fell between the election of legislators in November and the adjournment of ...

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Protecting Small Savers: The Political Economy of Economic Security

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pp. 126-145

Admitting, then, that it is eminently desirable to reduce the action of the organized public force to the minimum . . . shall we not say that government can not relieve itself from the necessity of frequent and minute interferences with industry in any other way to so great an extent as by, 1st, insisting on the thorough primary ...

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Did Insecure Property Rights Slow Economic Development? Some Lessons from Economic History

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pp. 146-164

Not long ago, a 43-year-old Wonder Bread deliveryman named John Dugger logged on to eBay and, as people sometimes do these days, bought himself a house. Not a shabby one, either. Nine rooms, three stories, rooftop patio, walls of solid stonework—it wasn’t quite a castle, but it put to shame the modest redbrick ranch house ...

Contributors

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pp. 165-166

Back Cover

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E-ISBN-13: 9780271052991
E-ISBN-10: 0271052996
Print-ISBN-13: 9780271028972
Print-ISBN-10: 0271028971

Page Count: 176
Publication Year: 2006

Series Title: Issues in Policy History
Series Editor Byline: General Editor: Donald T. Critchlow

Research Areas

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Subject Headings

  • United States -- Economic conditions -- 1865-1918.
  • United States -- Economic policy -- To 1933.
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 19th century.
  • United States -- Economic conditions -- To 1865.
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